Lung Cancer Dispatch
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Non-Uniform Genetic Mutations Identified in Lung Cancers Could Lead to Targeted Treatment

Non-Uniform Genetic Mutations Identified in Lung Cancers Could Lead to Targeted Treatment | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The research, published in the journal Oncotarget, explored tumour heterogeneity – where different cells have different appearances or their own DNA signatures within the same cancer. Such differences could make it difficult to design effective, targeted treatment strategies.


"Firstly they confirmed the mutual exclusivity between the EGFR mutation and either the KRAS or BRAF mutation. Secondly, they found that lung cancers driven by the EGFR gene mutation have that specific mutation present uniformly throughout the tumour, regardless of microscopic appearance. In stark contrast, they discovered that some tumours, with either KRAS or BRAF gene mutations, do not have the mutation present in all parts of the tumour.
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Editor's note: In recent years, lung cancer treatment has focused on the use of targeted therapy drugs. These drugs kill tumor cells that have certain cancer-causing genetic mutations, while generally leaving healthy cells unharmed. Oncologists use genetic testing to see if a patient's tumor has any specific genetic mutations that can be targeted by a specific drug. According to the research described here, different parts of a tumor may have different mutations that can be targeted by different drugs. This makes treatment more complicated, but continued research could lead to more effective treatments.

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Medical Xpress  |  Apr 23, 2014

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Inherited Mutated Gene Raises Lung Cancer Risk for Women, Those Who Never Smoked

Inherited Mutated Gene Raises Lung Cancer Risk for Women, Those Who Never Smoked | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"People who have an inherited mutation of a certain gene have a high chance of getting lung cancer—higher, even, than heavy smokers with or without the inherited mutation, according to new findings by cancer researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center. Although both genders have an equal risk of inheriting the mutation, those who develop lung cancer are mostly women and have never smoked, the researchers found.


"People with the rare inherited T790M mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene who have never smoked have a one-in-three chance of developing lung cancer, researchers found. This risk is considerably greater than that of the average heavy smoker, who has about a one-in-eight chance of developing lung cancer – about 40- fold greater than people who have never smoked and do not have the mutation."

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 24, 2014

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