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Vitamin D Blog: Do Low Levels Raise Cancer Death Rates?

Vitamin D Blog: Do Low Levels Raise Cancer Death Rates? | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Low levels of vitamin D were associated with higher cancer mortality in people with a history of cancer, a study found.


"Based on a meta-analysis, low 25(OH) vitamin D levels were tied to a risk ratio of 1.70 (95% CI 1.00-2.88) in cancer patients with a disease history. Inadequate vitamin D levels also were linked to an increase in all-cause mortality (RR 1.57, 95% CI 1.36-1.81) and cardiovascular mortality (RR 1.41, 95% CI 1.18-1.68), reported Ben Schöttker, PhD, of the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg, and colleagues in BMJ."

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MedPage Today  |  Jun 17, 2014

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MedPage Today  |  Jun 17, 2014

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MedPage Today  |  Jun 17, 2014

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The Ups and Downs of Lung Cancer Screening with Low-Dose CT

The Ups and Downs of Lung Cancer Screening with Low-Dose CT | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"As a form of cancer that kills 90% of those who develop it, lung cancer is a particularly fearsome adversary to the field of oncology. However, because half of patients with lung cancer have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis, early detection offers hope for reduced mortality.


"To this end, several organizations — including the American Cancer Society (ACS), the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, the American Lung Association (ALA) and the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) — have updated their lung cancer screening guidelines to suggest screenings with low-dose CT."

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Healio  |  May 21, 2014

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Early Referral to Outpatient Palliative Care Improved End-of-Life Care

Early Referral to Outpatient Palliative Care Improved End-of-Life Care | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Adult patients with advanced cancer who were referred early to outpatient palliative care experienced better end-of-life care compared with patients who received inpatient palliative care, according to study results.


"David Hui, MD, MSc, of the department of palliative care and rehabilitation medicine at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and colleagues evaluated data from 366 patients who died of advanced cancer from 2009 to 2010.


"All patients received a palliative care consultation, and 120 (33%) had an early referral, defined as longer than 3 months before death. Nearly half of the patients (n=169; 46%) first received outpatient palliative care."

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Healio  |  Mar 12, 2014

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Healio  |  Mar 12, 2014

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Healio  |  Mar 12, 2014

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Deaths from Lung Cancer Are Decreasing

Deaths from Lung Cancer Are Decreasing | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Deaths from lung cancer have been decreasing across the U.S., contributing to an overall trend of falling cancer death rates, according to a report coauthored by several major medical and research institutions. Covering the period from 1975 to 2010, the report finds that the decrease in lung cancer deaths has accelerated in recent years. The rate of new lung cancer cases has also fallen, though to a lesser extent. Much of this trend is likely due to the significant reduction in tobacco smoking in past decades, which is producing a delayed effect. The report also showed that the presence of additional illnesses aside from cancer, which can greatly affect outcomes in some other cancer types, has less of an effect on prognosis in lung cancer.

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Medical Xpress  |  Dec 16, 2013

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Blood Levels of Bilirubin Predict Lung Cancer Risk in Smokers

Blood Levels of Bilirubin Predict Lung Cancer Risk in Smokers | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Smokers with low blood levels of a molecule called bilirubin are at greater risk of developing lung cancer and dying from it, researchers have found. Among 400,000 people, they found that smokers with the lowest levels of bilirubin had a 69% higher rate of lung cancer and were 76% more likely to die from the disease compared to those with the highest bilirubin levels. Among nonsmokers, differences in bilirubin levels did not affect lung cancer risk. It is not clear whether bilirubin has a protective effect against lung cancer or whether low bilirubin is simply a byproduct of other processes involved in lung cancer development. Either way, low bilirubin levels could identify smokers at high risk of lung cancer who are particularly in need of anti-smoking interventions and cancer screening.

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American Association for Cancer Research | Apr 7, 2013

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Residential Segregation Associated with Higher Rates of Lung Cancer Death for Black Patients

A recent study revealed that residential segregation is tied to increased rates of death from lung cancer for black U.S. Americans, even after controlling for socioeconomic status and smoking rates. For black patients, rates of death from lung cancer increase with higher levels of racial segregation in their county of residence, while for white patients lung cancer mortality rates are lower in more segregated regions. The study’s authors suggest that public health initiatives aimed at reducing lung cancer deaths should be prioritized in highly segregated areas.


Primary source: http://archsurg.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1558105#qundefined

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MedPage Today | Jan 16, 2013

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ASCO: OK to Stop Statins in Terminal Illness

ASCO: OK to Stop Statins in Terminal Illness | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Stopping statins for terminal patients doesn't hasten death and may improve their quality of life, a trial showed.


"The 60-day mortality rate didn't differ significantly after discontinuation of long-standing statin therapy compared with staying on it (23.8% versus 20.3%, P=0.60), Amy Abernethy, MD, PhD, of Duke University Medical Center, and colleagues found."

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MedPage Today  |  May 30, 2014

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MedPage Today  |  May 30, 2014

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MedPage Today  |  May 30, 2014

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Major Lung Resection Safer than Ever, Especially at the Busiest Hospitals

Major Lung Resection Safer than Ever, Especially at the Busiest Hospitals | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Major lung surgery has become progressively safer over the last few decades, although higher death rates at low-volume hospitals and an unexpected increase in mortality at 90 days compared to 30 days were observed. The study further suggests that choosing a center that performs major lung surgery regularly can have a strong impact on survival."

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ScienceDaily  |  Apr 29, 2014

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Progress Against Cancer May Be Partially Obscured by Increased Overall Life Expectancy

Progress Against Cancer May Be Partially Obscured by Increased Overall Life Expectancy | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The gains made in the fight against cancer may be greater than is immediately obvious from the statistics. While deaths from cancer in the U.S. decreased 12% between 1970 and 2008, deaths due to other illnesses have decreased much more steeply. For example, deaths from heart disease fell by 62% in the same time period. However, the latter trend may explain the former—sharp declines in deaths from many illnesses, as well as from accidents, have led to an increase in life expectancy. More people are avoiding death from other causes and living long enough to eventually develop cancer; cancer risk rises steadily with advancing age. This trend may partially counterbalance the significant progress made in decreasing cancer death rates. 

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HealthDay  |  Jan 20, 2014

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Higher Healthcare Spending Associated with Fewer Cancer Deaths

The more a country’s government spends on healthcare, the lower the rate of deaths from cancer in that nation, a study in the European Union (EU) found. Higher gross domestic product (GDP), a higher percentage of GDP invested in healthcare, and more health expenditure per person per year were all linked to fewer deaths from cancer. EU member nations who score higher on these factors actually record a higher incidence of cancer, possibly because of better screening programs that detect more cases of cancer. However, in these countries, a significantly lower proportion of those diagnosed with cancer die from it.

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ScienceDaily | Sep 27, 2013

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ScienceDaily | Sep 27, 2013

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ScienceDaily | Sep 27, 2013

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Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy May be Riskier in Lung Cancer Patients with Large Tumors

Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy May be Riskier in Lung Cancer Patients with Large Tumors | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT), which is radiation treatment delivered at the same time as chemotherapy, has been found to be more effective in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) than sequential treatment with chemotherapy before or after irradiation, but also has greater toxic side effects. A retrospective study of patients with stage IIIA/B NSCLC, who had large tumors and/or extensive cancer spread to the lymph nodes, found that large tumors and presence of other illnesses were associated with shorter overall survival after CRT and higher risk of early death during treatment. While NSCLC patients with extensive lymph node involvement, but smaller tumors, may benefit from CRT without excessive risk, patients with large tumors and/or additional illnesses may be better served by alternative treatment approaches.

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Lung Cancer | Jan 26, 2013

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