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General Oncology - Six-Gene Signature Predicts Survival After Targeted Therapy for NSCLC

General Oncology - Six-Gene Signature Predicts Survival After Targeted Therapy for NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The presence of a six-gene profile in the microRNA of patients with advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) predicts reduced survival likelihood after first-line treatment with targeted therapy followed by chemotherapy for disease progression, indicate research results.


"While the findings 'should be further validated', the researchers believe their analysis 'supports the hypothesis that circulating [microRNA's] may further be developed as predictive markers for EGFR-targeted treatment' in an NSCLC population whose response to epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors is unknown."


Editor's note: This story describes a new, blood test-based method by which oncologists may be able to predict the effects of targeted therapy treatment on the survival of patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Specifically, it may be able to predict the effects of first-line treatment with drugs known as EGFR inhibitors, which are prescribed to people whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene, as detected by molecular testing. In a study with volunteer patients, scientists took blood samples just before and just after the patients began taking the drugs bevacizumab or erlotinib. The scientists identified six different kinds of a molecule called microRNA that, if present, were associated with a lower chance of survival (29 months versus more than 45 months). More testing will be needed to determine if this six-gene signature can be used widely; it would be a non-invasive alternative to making predictions and monitoring treatment effectiveness using repeat tumor biopsies.

Cancer Commons's insight:

medwireNews  |  June 20, 2014

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MicroRNA Signature Classifier May Reduce False Positives in Lung Cancer

MicroRNA Signature Classifier May Reduce False Positives in Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A noninvasive plasma microRNA signature classifier combined with low-dose CT was associated with a fivefold reduction in the false-positive rate for lung cancer detection compared with CT alone, according to results of a retrospective study.


"The analysis included 939 smokers enrolled in the Multicenter Italian Lung Detection trial who had been assigned low-dose CT (n=652) or observation (n=287)."


Editor's Note: Sometimes a doctor believes he/she has detected lung cancer in a patient, but the patient is later found not to have lung cancer. This is known as a "false positive." Scientists tested a new lung cancer detection procedure to see if it reduced the risk of false positives. The procedure combines CT scans with molecular testing of a patient's blood sample for substances that could indicate the presence of lung cancer. It found that the new procedure worked better than CT scans alone.

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Healio  |  Mar 19, 2014

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