Lung Cancer Dispatch
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News for Patients and Physicians
Curated by Cancer Commons
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Advances in Immunotherapy Brighten Prospects for People with Cancer

Advances in Immunotherapy Brighten Prospects for People with Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The enthusiasm for anticancer immunotherapies continues to build, with two treatments already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and clinical trials underway for a variety of promising new candidates. The latest approaches include targeting a protein called PD-L1, which shields tumor cells from immune system attacks. In a phase I clinical trial of a PD-L1 blocker made by MedImmune, early results suggest that this treatment shrinks melanomas as well as kidney, lung, and colon tumors. Next, the researchers hope to open this trial to people with head and neck cancers as well. Another approach entails adding the gene for an immune system booster (interferon beta) to a therapeutic virus (vesicular stomatitis virus) that kills cancer cells, but not normal ones. This treatment is being tested on liver cancer in a phase I trial and early results are encouraging.

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The Miami Herald│Jul 26, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, August 2, 2013 5:09 PM

The Miami Herald│Jul 26, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, August 2, 2013 5:37 PM

The Miami Herald│Jul 26, 2013

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New Drug May Mobilize the Immune System to Attack Tumors

New Drug May Mobilize the Immune System to Attack Tumors | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new drug called MPDL3280A appears to shrink tumors in patients with a range of different cancers, including lung cancer and melanoma. In an ongoing clinical trial, MPDL3280A shrank tumors in 21% of patients with advanced cancer. Response rates were even higher in subsets of patients with lung cancer (22%) or melanoma (29%). Treatment benefits lasted from 3 to 15 months and counting; 26 of the 29 patients who benefited continue to respond to this day. There was wide variation in how quickly patients responded to treatment, with some experiencing significant improvement within days, and others after weeks of unresponsiveness. MPDL3280A was generally well tolerated, with few cases of severe side effects.

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ASCO Daily News | Jun 13, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 17, 2013 2:07 PM

ASCO Daily News | June 13, 2013

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Targeted Therapies Might Replace Chemotherapy for Cancer Treatment in the Future

Targeted Therapies Might Replace Chemotherapy for Cancer Treatment in the Future | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Targeted therapies, drugs that are directed at specific molecular abnormalities in a patient’s cancer, may replace chemotherapy as the treatment of choice for many cancers. Because targeted therapies attack specific pathways that are central to the growth of cancer cells, but often not necessary for the survival of healthy tissues, they usually produce fewer side effects than chemotherapy, which damages both cancerous and healthy cells. Studies documenting better outcomes with chemotherapy-free targeted treatment regimens are emerging for numerous cancers, including melanoma, certain forms of leukemia and lymphoma, and a type of sarcoma called gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Targeted therapies continue to be limited by the development of drug resistance, an issue that researchers are trying to tackle through combination treatments and new drugs targeting resistant tumors.

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Time | Jun 26, 2013

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Experimental PD-1 Blocker May Work Across Cancer Types

Experimental PD-1 Blocker May Work Across Cancer Types | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Results of a phase I clinical trial suggest that a new immunotherapy drug called MPDL3280A could control a wide range of cancers. Manufactured by Roche Genentech, MPDL3280A is one of several promising but experimental drugs that block PD-1, a cell surface protein that disguises tumor cells from our immune systems. The study included 140 people with different kinds of tumors (melanoma as well as colorectal, gastric, kidney, and non-small cell lung cancers) that had resisted other treatments. Tumors shrank in 21% of those treated with MPDL3280A, particularly people with melanoma or lung cancer. These findings were presented at the 2013 meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. While still in the very early stages of research, targeting tumors with our own immune systems has great potential to work across many different cancer types and to keep them in check longer than current treatments, say researchers, giving new hope to people with cancer.

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Science Daily│Jun 3, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 4, 2013 7:50 PM

Science Daily│Jun 3, 2013