Lung Cancer Dispatch
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Pfizer Cancer Drug Fails in Two Late Stage Studies

In a recent phase III clinical trial, the cancer drug dacomitinib was no more effective than a placebo at prolonging survival for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) for whom standard therapy had failed. Like the targeted drugs erlotinib (Tarceva) and gefitinib (Iressa), dacomitinib blocks the protein EGFR, but it also inhibits a number of similar, related proteins. Another trial compared dacomitinib to Tarceva in NSCLC patients who had previously received at least one EGFR inhibitor. Dacomitinib did not increase time without cancer worsening compared to Tarceva. Results from a third phase III trial, which compares dacomitinib to Iressa in NSCLC patients with EGFR mutations, are expected next year.

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Bloomberg Businessweek  |  Jan 27, 2014

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New Immune-Based Drug Shows Signs of Effectiveness in Several Cancers

The new cancer drug MPDL3280A has produced promising results in an early clinical trial that investigated patients with various advanced cancers, including lung cancer; melanoma; and cancer of the kidney, intestines, or stomach. All participants had previously seen their cancer worsen despite treatment. Yet, during treatment with MPDL3280A, tumors shrank significantly in more than one-fifth of the patients. Response rates were especially high in lung cancer and melanoma patients. Of the patients who responded to MPDL3280A, almost all continue to see effects now, 3 to 15+ months into the study. MPDL3280A targets a protein, PD-L1, that is often expressed on cancer cells and "hides" the cells from the body’s immune response; by blocking PD-L1, MPDL3280A allows the immune system to attack the tumors. Further studies will be needed to confirm these findings.

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ASCO Post | May 17, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 4, 2013 2:22 PM

ASCO Post | May 17, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 4, 2013 2:22 PM

ASCO Post | May 17, 2013

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Avastin-Taxol Regimen May Be Effective Late-Line Treatment for Advanced Non-Squamous NSCLC

Avastin-Taxol Regimen May Be Effective Late-Line Treatment for Advanced Non-Squamous NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A retrospective study assessed the use of weekly bevacizumab (Avastin) along with paclitaxel (Taxol) every 3 weeks in patients with advanced non-squamous, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who had previously received at least three rounds of treatment. The Avastin-Taxol combination was found to be an effective anti-tumor treatment. Some patients experienced serious side effects, including one death. However, overall toxicity was deemed acceptable compared to typical chemotherapy results in similar patients.

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Lung Cancer | Feb 14, 2013

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Biomarker May Predict Best Response to Lung Cancer Drug MK-3475

Biomarker May Predict Best Response to Lung Cancer Drug MK-3475 | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

An early clinical trial of the drug MK-3475 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has yielded promising results. MK-3475 targets PD-1, a protein on the surface of immune cells. Another protein, PD-L1, is present on many tumor cells and can bind to PD-1, which deactivates immune cells. MK-3475 blocks PD-1, allowing the immune cells to keep attacking cancer cells. Patients with advanced NSCLC who had failed at least two other treatments were given MK-3475. Tumors shrank in 24% of the patients overall. However, tumor shrinkage occurred in 67% of patients with high levels of PD-L1 on their tumors, compared to only 9% of others. PD-L1 levels may therefore help predict which patients will likely respond to MK-3475.

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Medical Xpress  |  Jan 8, 2014

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Lung Cancer Patient with ROS1 Mutation Responds to Xalkori

Lung Cancer Patient with ROS1 Mutation Responds to Xalkori | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A patient with advanced lung adenocarcinoma, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), had relapsed from, or failed to respond to, numerous chemotherapy agents and targeted therapies and was deteriorating rapidly. Previous molecular testing had found no mutations in commonly tested biomarker genes, but a follow-up test detected a mutation in the ROS1 gene. The patient then started treatment with crizotinib (Xalkori) and experienced a dramatic improvement, including tumor shrinkage. Xalkori treatment has continued for 12 weeks so far, with no sign of cancer progression. This case demonstrates the remarkable effectiveness that Xalkori can have in ROS1-mutant NSCLC, as well as the need for prompt and comprehensive molecular testing for all NSCLC patients.

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Lung Cancer | Apr 4, 2013

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