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Chemo Combo Increases Survival, Toxicity in Sensitive Relapsed SCLC

Chemo Combo Increases Survival, Toxicity in Sensitive Relapsed SCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Cisplatin, etoposide, and irinotecan outperformed topotecan as second-line chemotherapy in patients with sensitive relapsed small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) in a Japanese trial, though there was substantially increased toxicity with the regimen.


“ 'Topotecan is the only drug approved in the United States and the European Union for relapsed SCLC,' said Koichi Goto, MD, PhD, of the National Cancer Center Hospital East in Chiba, Japan. He presented results of the new trial at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago. Sensitive relapse refers to cancers that respond to initial chemotherapy and relapse more than 3 months after completion of that therapy, while refractory cancers do not respond initially or relapse within that 3 month window."


Editor's note: This story is about a clinical trial with volunteer patients to test a new treatment for small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The new treatment is specifically for people with SCLC who were treated with chemotherapy successfully, but whose cancer returned more than 3 months after chemo—this is known as "sensitive relapsed SCLC." The new treatment combines three chemo drugs: cisplatin, etoposide, and irinotecan. In the clinical trial, some patients took the chemo combo and some were treated with the chemo drug topotecan, which is a standard treatment for the condition. Patients who took the new treatment lived longer, but they had more toxic side effects than the patients who took topotecan.

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Cancer Network  |  Jun 23, 2014

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Timing Cancer Treatment for Maximum Effectiveness

Timing Cancer Treatment for Maximum Effectiveness | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Our bodies follow a 24-hour 'biorhythm' that affects most of our biological functions. This fact forms the basis of cancer chronotherapy, which takes time of day into account to plan cancer treatment. Administering cancer drugs at the right time can double effectiveness while reducing toxicity up to fivefold. However, individual differences in biorhythms mean that the 'right time' varies from one person to another. In a recent study, researchers linked gene expression in mice with the time point at which the chemotherapy agent irinotecan (Camptosar) produced the least toxicity. They developed a mathematical model that predicts each animal's ideal time point based on the expression of two genes. In the future, they hope to develop similar tools to help predict the best time for cancer treatment in human patients.

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Medical Xpress  |  Nov 22, 2013

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Medical Xpress  |  Nov 22, 2013

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Medical Xpress  |  Nov 22, 2013

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Amrubicin and Cisplatin Inferior to Irinotecan Regimen for Small-Cell Lung Cancer

Amrubicin and Cisplatin Inferior to Irinotecan Regimen for Small-Cell Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A combination of amrubicin and cisplatin was inferior to irinotecan and cisplatin in chemotherapy-naïve patients with extensive disease small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) in a phase III trial conducted in Japan. The irinotecan regimen remains the standard treatment for these patients in that country.


"SCLC accounts for 13% of all new cases of lung cancer, and more than half of those patients present with extensive disease. Though SCLC can be very sensitive to chemotherapy, authors of the new study wrote that “rapid emergence of clinical drug resistance has resulted in poor prognosis, with almost all such patients dead with 2 years of initial diagnosis.” Investigators led by Miyako Satouchi, MD, PhD, of the Hyogo Cancer Center in Akashi, Japan, tested the amrubicin and cisplatin combination against irinotecan and cisplatin in 284 patients; results were published online ahead of print on March 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology."

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Cancer Network  |  Apr 23, 2014

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