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Experimental Leukaemia Drug Boosts Immune Response Against Other Cancers

Experimental Leukaemia Drug Boosts Immune Response Against Other Cancers | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Experimental drugs being tested in clinical trials for leukaemia may also boost the body’s immune response against other forms of cancer, according to research from University College London (UCL).


"The drugs target an important protein called p110δ, produced in large amounts in white blood cells called ‘leukocytes’.


"Leukaemias can develop if leukocytes become cancerous, making p110δ a promising target for treating this form of cancer.


"And recent clinical trials using these drugs have shown encouraging results. But until now the potential benefit of these drugs for other types of cancer had remained unexplored.


"In the latest study, published in Nature, researchers working with mice bearing solid tumours found that the drugs - called p110δ inhibitors - helped boost their immune response against a range of tumour types – including breast cancer."


Editor's note: Scientists have tested new drugs in mice with a variety of tumor types, including breast cancer, and found that the drugs may help the mice fight off cancer. These drugs are already being used in humans in clinical trials for leukemia, so it might not be long before scientists try the drugs in volunteer patients with other types of cancer.

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Cancer Research UK  |  Jun 11, 2014

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Immunomedics Announces Objective Responses in Five Types of Solid Cancer With IMMU-132

"Immunomedics, Inc., (Nasdaq:IMMU) today reported that 71% of patients (34 of 48) with diverse metastatic solid cancers had durable disease stabilization after receiving treatments with the Company's novel investigational antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), IMMU-132. These include 7 patients (15%) with colorectal, small-cell and non-small-cell lung, esophageal, and triple-negative breast cancers showing partial responses with tumor shrinkage of 30% or more as measured by computed tomography (CT)."


Editor's note: Scientists have developed a new cancer drug called IMMU-132, which may work in a variety of cancer types. IMMU-132 is an immunotherapy, meaning it boosts a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. A clinical trial to test the drug in volunteer patients found promising results, including in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.

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NASDAQ  |  Jun 2, 2014

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New System for Treating Cancer Seen as Hopeful

New System for Treating Cancer Seen as Hopeful | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Drugs that unleash the body’s immune system to combat tumors could allow patients with advanced melanoma to live far longer than ever before, researchers gathered at the nation’s largest cancer conference say.

“ 'It’s a completely different world for patients with metastatic melanoma, to talk about the majority of patients being alive for years rather than weeks or months,' said Dr. Jedd D. Wolchok, a melanoma specialist at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, interviewed at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology here."

Editor's note: This is a good exploration of immunotherapy treatments for melanoma; immunotherapy for lung cancer is also discussed.

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The New York Times  |  Jun 2, 2014

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The New York Times  |  Jun 2, 2014

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Transgene Announces Promising Results in an Update from the Phase 2b Part of TIME Trial with TG4010 in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

"Transgene SA (TNG.PA) (TNG.PA) today announced promising results in an update incorporating more mature data from the Phase 2b part of the Phase 2b/3 TIME trial1 with TG4010 MUC-1 targeted immunotherapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).


"Following an analysis conducted with a more mature dataset, the primary endpoint of progression-free survival (PFS) to validate the TrPAL predictive biomarker was met2 in the normal TrPAL3 group. The high TrPAL group had not yet met the required number of events to conduct the primary analysis."


Editor's note: This clinical trial is testing whether an immunotherapy drug called TG4010 MUC-1 might be effective for some patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). For more information, see this trial in our Clinical Trial Finder.

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Yahoo!  |  May 27, 2014

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FDA Grants Merck’s Anti-PD1 Antibody Priority Review

FDA Grants Merck’s Anti-PD1 Antibody Priority Review | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The FDA has granted Merck’s anti-PD1 antibody MK-3475 a priority review designation for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma in patients who have previously been treated with ipilimumab. Priority review status is reserved for drugs considered to offer a significant improvement in the safety or efficacy of the treatment of a serious condition. It will shorten the drug’s FDA review period from 10 months to 6 months."


Editor's note: MK-3475 is an immunotherapy drug that works by boosting a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. While this story is about melanoma, anti-PD1 drugs like MK-3475 have also shown promise for other cancers, including for lung cancer. Once it is approved by the FDA for unresectable or metastatic melanoma, doctors in the U.S. will be able to prescribe it to their patients outside of the clinical trial system. 

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Cancer Network  |  May 21, 2014

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Cancer Network  |  May 21, 2014

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Patient’s Cells Deployed to Attack Aggressive Cancer

Patient’s Cells Deployed to Attack Aggressive Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Doctors have taken an important step toward a long-sought goal: harnessing a person’s own immune system to fight cancer.


"An article published Thursday in the journal Science describes the treatment of a 43-year-old woman with an advanced and deadly type of cancer that had spread from her bile duct to her liver and lungs, despite chemotherapy.


"Researchers at the National Cancer Institute sequenced the genome of her cancer and identified cells from her immune system that attacked a specific mutation in the malignant cells. Then they grew those immune cells in the laboratory and infused billions of them back into her bloodstream.


"The tumors began 'melting away,' said Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg, the senior author of the article and chief of the surgery branch at the cancer institute."


Editor's note: This story is about an "immunotherapy" technique meant to boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. Learn more about immunotherapy here.

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New York Times  |  May 8, 2014

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New York Times  |  May 8, 2014

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New Cancer Vaccine Approach Directly Targets Dendritic Cells

New Cancer Vaccine Approach Directly Targets Dendritic Cells | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Celldex Therapeutics announced today that final data from its Phase 1 study of CDX-1401 in solid tumors, including long-term patient follow-up, have been published inScience Translational Medicine. The data demonstrate robust antibody and T cell responses and evidence of clinical benefit in patients with very advanced cancers and suggest that CDX-1401 may predispose patients to better outcomes on subsequent therapy with checkpoint inhibitors. CDX-1401 is an off-the-shelf vaccine consisting of a fully human monoclonal antibody with specificity for the dendritic cell receptor DEC-205 linked to the NY-ESO-1 tumor antigen. The vaccine is designed to activate the patient's immune system against cancers that express the tumor marker NY-ESO-1. While the function of NY-ESO-1 continues to be explored, references in the literature suggest that its expression might reflect the acquisition of properties that cancers find useful, such as immortality, self-renewal, migratory ability and the capacity to invade."


Editor's note: Cancer vaccines like CDX-1401 are a type of immunotherapy, meaning that they boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. CDX-1401 is able to attack tumor cells because the tumor cells have a molecule called NY-ESO-1 that CDX-1401 recognizes. We recently published a story about another treatment that is meant for patients whose tumors have NY-ESO-1. To learn more about how patients can use molecular testing to see if particular treatments might work for them, click here.

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Medical Xpress  |  Apr 16, 2014

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GSK Pulls Plug on Late-Stage Lung Cancer Trial

GSK Pulls Plug on Late-Stage Lung Cancer Trial | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"GlaxoSmithKline has been forced to halt a Phase III trial assessing its MAGE-A3 cancer immunotherapeutic in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).


"High hopes for the experimental immunotherapy - designed to help patients stave off the return of the disease after treatment - came after it emerged that researchers would not be able to identify a subset of patients who may benefit from its therapy, hot on the heels of other disappointing data."


Editor's note: Immunotherapy drugs are meant to boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. We previously posted about the immunotherapy drug MAGE-A3. Even though it did not perform very well when tested in a clinical trial, researchers hoped to find a subset of patients who could benefit. However, it seems they could not.

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PharmaTimes  |  Apr 2, 2014

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Innate Pharma SA begins Phase I Trial with Lirilumab and Nivolumab in Selected Solid Tumors Under Cohort Expansion

"Biopharmaceutical company Innate Pharma SA (euronext paris:FR0010331421) reported on Monday that it has started the cohort expansion portion of the Phase I clinical trial testing the combination of the two investigational checkpoint inhibitors lirilumab and nivolumab in selected solid tumors...


"The company said the trial will test lirilumab (anti-KIR checkpoint inhibitor; BMS-986015) in combination with nivolumab (anti-PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor BMS-936558) in solid tumors. The Phase I open label study will evaluate the safety of the combination of lirilumab and nivolumab and to provide preliminary information on the clinical activity of the combination. The primary outcome is safety."


Editor's note: Nivolumab is an immunotherapy drug that activates the immune system's T cells in the hopes that the patient's own immune system will be prompted to fight tumors. Nivolumab has already been shown to be a promising melanoma treatment on its own. Lirilumab is a drug that activates a different group of immune system cells known as natural killer cells (NK). This clinical trial combines both drugs to see if they work better together.

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MENAFN  |  Mar 31, 2014

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Potential Lung Cancer Vaccine Shows Renewed Promise

Potential Lung Cancer Vaccine Shows Renewed Promise | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Researchers at UC Davis have found that the investigational cancer vaccine tecemotide, when administered with the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, boosted immune response and reduced the number of tumors in mice with lung cancer. The study also found that radiation treatments did not significantly impair the immune response. The paper was published on March 10 in the journal Cancer Immunology Research, an American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) publication.


"Though tecemotide, also known as Stimuvax, has shown great potential at times, the recent Phase III trial found no overall survival benefit for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, further analysis showed one group of patients, who received concurrent chemotherapy and radiation followed by tecemotide, did benefit from the vaccine. As a result, tecemotide's manufacturer, Merck KGaA, is sponsoring additional post-clinical animal and human studies, so far with good results."


Editor's note: Cancer vaccines are meant to stimulate the immune system to fight cancer. Stimuvax is a cancer vaccine that was found to have no overall survival benefit for patients in a recent clinical trial. But closer analysis of the trial data and the mouse study mentioned above have raised hopes that the vaccine might work with some combination of chemo and radiation treatment.

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 20, 2014

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Ohio State Partners with MedVax to Bring a Cancer Peptide Vaccine to Patients

Ohio State Partners with MedVax to Bring a Cancer Peptide Vaccine to Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The Ohio State University, through the Ohio State Innovation Foundation, has signed an exclusive world-wide licensing agreement with MedVax Technologies, Inc., for the licensing of groundbreaking cancer peptide vaccine technologies.


"The anticancer vaccine technologies are designed for the treatment and prevention of cancers associated with the HER2 protein. These include breast, ovarian, lung, colon and pancreatic cancers, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The commitment by MedVax will allow innovative clinical trials for various cancers to be conducted in the near future."


Editor's Note: Cancer vaccines are a type of "immune therapy," which means that they boost a patient's immune system to fight cancer. To learn more about immune therapies for lung cancer, read our blog feature on the topic.

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 18, 2014

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Cancer Vaccine Could Use Immune System to Fight Tumors

Cancer Vaccine Could Use Immune System to Fight Tumors | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Cincinnati Cancer Center (CCC) and UC Cancer Institute researchers have found that a vaccine, targeting tumors that produce a certain protein and receptor responsible for communication between cells and the body's immune system, could initiate the immune response to fight cancer.


"These findings, published in the online edition of the journalGene Therapy, build on previously reported research and could lead to new treatments for cancer."


Editor's Note: This cancer vaccine (interleukin-15, or IL-15) is currently being given to patients in several clinical trials for several different types of cancer. Visit clinicaltrials.gov to learn more.

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Medical News Today  |  Mar 3, 2014

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Medical News Today  |  Mar 3, 2014

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Clinical Trial to Examine Effectiveness of Lung Cancer Vaccine TG4010 in Select Patients

A new clinical trial will examine the effectiveness of the lung cancer drug TG4010. TG4010 acts like a vaccine: it sensitizes the immune system to MUC1, a protein expressed in high levels on many lung tumor cells, and thus primes the immune system to attack these cancer cells. A previous trial suggested that TG4010 is most likely to be effective in patients with low levels of a certain kind of immune cell called triple-positive activated lymphocytes or TrPAL. In the new trial, patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors express high levels of MUC1 and who have low levels of TrPAL will receive either TG4010 or a placebo along with their standard treatment.

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Bloomberg  |  Jan 8, 2014

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Astrazeneca’s Medimmune Presents Encouraging Immunotherapy Data at ASCO 2014

"MedImmune, the global biologics research and development arm of AstraZeneca, presented results today from its novel investigational immunotherapy portfolio, focusing on MEDI4736, at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2014 Annual Meeting.  Overall, studies demonstrated durable clinical activity and tolerability for MEDI4736 across a range of tumor types.


"This announcement follows the recent progression of the first Phase III study for MEDI4736, an investigational, engineered, human monoclonal antibody directed against programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1). Signals from PD-L1 help tumors avoid detection by the immune system. It is believed that by targeting PD-L1, MEDI4736 may block this ligand from sending out signals to T-cells to ‘ignore’ tumor cells, thereby countering cancer’s immune-evading tactics.


Editor's note: Immunotherapy treatments that boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer are a promising area of cancer research. A new immunotherapy drug called MEDI4736 is being tested in volunteer patients with different cancer types, and has shown good results for some patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

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MedImmune  |  Jun 3, 2014

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Aduro Announces ASCO Presentation of Promising Results from Phase 1b Clinical trial of its Novel Immunotherapy for the Treatment of Mesothelioma

Aduro Announces ASCO Presentation of Promising Results from Phase 1b Clinical trial of its Novel Immunotherapy for the Treatment of Mesothelioma | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Aduro BioTech, Inc., a clinical stage biotechnology company, today announced the presentation of safety and efficacy data from a Phase 1b clinical trial of its novel immunotherapy CRS-207 in combination with standard chemotherapy in patients with unresectable malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Of the 16 evaluable patients, 69% (11/16) had confirmed durable partial responses (PR) with 25% (4/16) experiencing stable disease (SD) after CRS-207 and chemotherapy. The results were presented by Raffit Hassan, M.D., co-chief of the Thoracic and GI Oncology Branch at the National Cancer Institute, in a poster presentation at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology Meeting (ASCO) held in Chicago."


Editor's note: Scientists have developed a new drug called CRS-207 for treating mesothelioma. CRS-207 is an immunotherapy, meaning that it boosts a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. A clinical trial testing CRS-207 in volunteer patients found promising results for the drug.

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StreetInsider  |  Jun 2, 2014

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CRS-207, based on Aduro’s live-attenuated, double-deleted (LADD) Listeria monocytogenesimmunotherapy platform, has been engineered to induce a potent innate immune response as well as an adaptive immune response targeting mesothelin, an antigen over-expressed in MPM tumors.


CRS-207 plus GVAX in a Phase II advanced pancreatic cancer trial (ECLIPSE) in 93 evaluable patients extended overall survival to 6.1 months from the GVAX arm alone.

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ASCO: Chemotherapy Key Part of Curative Lung Cancer Therapies

ASCO: Chemotherapy Key Part of Curative Lung Cancer Therapies | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Cancer Network: Thank you for speaking with us today, Dr. Kris. First, can you tell us why this is an important topic for an education session? Is there a debate of the use of chemotherapy in treating lung cancer?


"Dr. Kris: I wouldn’t quite say that there is a debate, but there is an impression that the therapy of lung cancers has switched to targeted therapies or immune therapies. Looking at the ASCO abstracts this year that would be an easy conclusion to draw. But there is an indisputable fact that no matter what target you can identify in a patient’s tumor, be it PD-L1 or a BRAF mutation, at some point in a patient’s illness they will be receiving chemotherapy. As we look at entire care of people with lung cancer it is very important to remember that virtually every single one will receive chemotherapy, and that we need to pay attention to choosing the best chemotherapy. We also need to think about doing research in chemotherapy. Clearly, we can do a better job, and we need more research to find the best drugs. Also, we need to find a way to use them with our targeted therapies."


Editor's note: Targeted therapies and immunotherapies are all the rage now in cancer treatment. But there are still important roles for chemotherapy. This article gives a great overview of recent advancements in the use of chemotherapy in lung cancer treatment, and why we need further research to refine and improve the benefits of chemotherapy.

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Cancer Network  |  May 29, 2014

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Old Cancer Drug Gets Fresh Look

Old Cancer Drug Gets Fresh Look | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"When Dave deBronkart was diagnosed with advanced kidney cancer in 2007, he learned about a treatment called high-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) that fires up the body’s immune system to fight the disease. The response rate was not great — tumours shrank in only about 15% of patients. And as many as 4% of people died from the treatment. But some of those who responded survived for years or even decades."


Editor's note: IL-2 is an immunotherapy drug, meaning that it boosts a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. It and other new immunotherapies are showing promise for patients across many different cancer types.

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Nature  |  May 27, 2014

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AstraZeneca Launches Phase 3 Study of NSCLC Immunotherapy

AstraZeneca Launches Phase 3 Study of NSCLC Immunotherapy | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"On the heels of rebuking merger offers from Pfizer, AstraZeneca announced in a press release it is moving forward with the phase 3 PACIFIC trial of a lung cancer immunotherapy drug.


"The drug, MEDI4736, is a human monoclonal antibody directed against programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1). The drug, still in development, targets the PD-L1/PD-1 pathway for the treatment of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by blocking signals which allow PD-L1 to escape detection by the immune system."


Editor's note: MEDI4736 is an immunotherapy drug that is meant to boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. Learn more about immunotherapy and clinical trials here.

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Healio  |  May 9, 2014

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Future of Cancer Treatments

Future of Cancer Treatments | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The news spurred hundreds of phone calls and emails to Comprehensive Cancer Centers of Nevada from across the country: Two Stage 4 cancer patients at the Las Vegas center, after participating in the first human trial of an antibody drug with the unwieldy code name of MPDL 3280A, were now cancer-free.


"Rosemary Rathbun, 78, had been so far gone with throat cancer that doctors told her to enroll in hospice. Lorrine Rodgers, 56, had been told there were no other treatments for her spreading breast cancer.


"That their cancer disappeared, the women said in January, was a miracle."


Editor's note: This story is a great overview of an increasingly promising type of cancer treatment called immunotherapy. Immunotherapy treatments boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer.

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Las Vegas Review-Journal  |  Apr 26, 2014

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Using a Person's Own Immune System to Fight Cancer: Phase I Clinical Trial of New Immunotherapy Beginning

Using a Person's Own Immune System to Fight Cancer: Phase I Clinical Trial of New Immunotherapy Beginning | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Moffitt Cancer Center has initiated a phase I clinical trial for a new immunotherapy drug, ID-G305, made by Immune Design. Immunotherapy is a treatment option that uses a person’s own immune system to fight cancer. It has several advantages over standard cancer therapies, including fewer side effects and an overall better tolerability. It tends to be most effective in patients who have smaller, localized tumors that have not spread to distant sites."


Editor's note: This treatment looks for and targets cells that have the protein NY-ESO-1. Only 10-15% of tumors have NY-ESO-1, and patients' tumors must test positive for NY-ESO-1 in order for the patients to enroll in the trial. Learn more about immunotherapy and clinical trials here.

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ScienceDaily  |  Apr 10, 2014

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Deploying the Body's Army

Deploying the Body's Army | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"More than a century ago, American bone surgeon William Coley came across the case of Fred Stein, whose aggressive cheek sarcoma had disappeared after he suffered a Streptococcus pyogenesinfection following surgery to remove part of the large tumor. Seven years later, Coley tracked Stein down and found him alive, with no evidence of cancer. Amazed, Coley speculated that the immune response to the bacterial infection had played an integral role in fighting the disease, and the doctor went on to inoculate more than 10 other patients suffering from inoperable tumors with Streptococcus bacteria. Sure enough, several of those who survived the infection—and one who did not—experienced tumor reduction."


Editor's note: This article is a great overview of immunotherapy for treating cancer. Immunotherapy drugs boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. Learn more.

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The Scientist  |  Apr 1, 2014

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Immunotherapy Data Herald New Era of Lung Cancer Treatment

Immunotherapy Data Herald New Era of Lung Cancer Treatment | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A new era of lung cancer therapy is dawning, using drugs that can prevent tumor cells from evading the immune system, experts reported at the 4th European Lung Cancer Congress. For decades, scientists and doctors thought immunotherapy was of marginal benefit in lung cancer, said ESMO spokesperson Jean-Charles Soria, MD, PhD, of Institut Gustave Roussy, Paris. However a new class of drugs known as immune checkpoint regulators have shown huge potential, he said. New data on several of these drugs will be presented at the conference, held March 26 to 29 in Geneva, Switzerland."


Editor's note: Immunotherapy treatments boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. Learn more.

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The ASCO Post  |  Mar 26, 2014

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Investigational MAGE-A3 Antigen-Specific Cancer Immunotherapeutic Does Not Meet First Co-Primary Endpoints in MAGRIT, a Phase III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Clinical Trial

Investigational MAGE-A3 Antigen-Specific Cancer Immunotherapeutic Does Not Meet First Co-Primary Endpoints in MAGRIT, a Phase III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Clinical Trial | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"GlaxoSmithKline plc (LSE:GSK) today announced that analysis of the MAGRITi trial, a phase III trial of its MAGE-A3 cancer immunotherapeuticii in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, showed that the trial did not meet its first or second co-primary endpoint as it did not significantly extend disease-free survival (DFSiii) when compared to placebo in either the overall MAGE-A3 positive population (first co-primary endpoint) or in those MAGE-A3-positive patients who did not receive chemotherapy (second co-primary endpoint). GSK currently remains blinded to the overall trial data from the analysis of the first two co-primary endpoints to allow for the unbiased generation of a mathematical model to assess the third co-primary endpointiv."


Editor's Note: This story is about a drug that is meant to boost the patient's own immune system to fight lung cancer. The study has found no significant survival benefit of the drug, but the drug company hopes to find a sub-population of people with lung cancer for whom the drug will work. Learn more about immunotherapy and clinical trials.

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GSK  |  Mar 20, 2014

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Bristol Plans Big Lung Cancer Study, Pairing Immunotherapies

"Bristol-Myers Squibb Co on Tuesday said it plans this year to begin a late-stage trial testing whether a combination of two of its high-profile immunotherapies can effectively treat lung cancer, easing concerns about the company's intentions.


"Company executives spooked investors in January by saying they were not yet planning a late-stage trial that would combine its experimental medicine, nivolumab, and an approved melanoma treatment called Yervoy as a treatment for lung cancer.


"But spirits lifted on Tuesday when Brian Daniels, senior vice president of global development for Bristol-Myers, told investors at the Cowen and Co healthcare conference in Boston that the Phase III trial was indeed on track to begin by the end of 2014."


Editor's Note: This article has a business spin, but may be of interest to lung cancer patients curious about clinical trials. To learn more about clinical trials and how they can sometimes be good treatment options, visit our Lung Cancer Basics.

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Reuters  |  Mar 4, 2014

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Anti-PD-1 Antibody MK-3475 Advances Into Multiple Tumor Types

Anti-PD-1 Antibody MK-3475 Advances Into Multiple Tumor Types | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Merck announced the signing of three separate clinical collaboration agreements to evaluate the potential of its investigational anti-PD-1 immunotherapy MK-3475 across multiple tumor types.  The agreements, of which financial terms were not disclosed, were signed through subsidiaries with Amgen Inc., Incyte Corporation, and Pfizer Inc.

"As part of the new collaborations, Merck will begin several clinical trials. In these phase I/II studies, MK-3475 will be explored in combination with axitinib in renal cell carcinoma, talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC) in previously untreated advanced melanoma, the immunotherapy INCB24360 in previously treated metastatic recurrent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and PF-2566 in multiple cancer types. Separate from these collaborations, Merck announced that the safety and efficacy of MK-3475 monotherapy would be evaluated in a phase I “signal finding” study in 20 PD-L1-positive solid tumor types not previously studied."

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OncLive  |  Feb 7, 2014

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