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ASCO Releases First Three Guidelines on Cancer Survivorship Care

"The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) today issued three evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on the prevention and management of symptoms that affect many cancer survivors—neuropathy, fatigue and depression, and anxiety. The guidelines are the first three in a planned series of guidelines on survivorship care. The recommendations reinforce the need to care for the both physical and psychological needs of cancer survivors."


"The release of these guidelines come at a time when the number of people with a history of cancer in the United States has increased dramatically, from 3 million in 1971 to about 13.7 million today. Despite these important gains, cancer survivors still face a range of long-term challenges from their disease and its treatment.  Cancer survivors face an increased risk for other health problems, premature mortality and side-effects from treatment.  The transition from active treatment to post-treatment care is critical to optimal long-term health. If care is not planned and coordinated, cancer survivors are left without knowledge of their heightened risks and a follow-up plan of action.


"In addition to the guidelines, Cancer.Net, ASCO’s patient information website, has updated information for survivors that is based on ASCO’s latest recommendations."

Cancer Commons's insight:

ASCO  |  Apr 14, 2014

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ASCO  |  Apr 14, 2014

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ASCO  |  Apr 14, 2014

Tambre Leighn's curator insight, April 17, 2014 11:30 AM

Great.  More guidelines.  How much money is spent on research, writing, studies and more to get to the finding that there is a, "need to care for the both physical and psychological needs of cancer survivors."  At some point, information must be turned into action - and many recommendations in survivorship these days come with mandates but no resources to implement or processes by which to initiate.


Cancer survivorship needs more funding and more insurance coverage, not more recommendations  - most of which have already been well documented and published for over a decade.  

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NICE Draft Guidance Recommends Boehringer Ingelheim’s Giotrif

NICE Draft Guidance Recommends Boehringer Ingelheim’s Giotrif | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"UK drugs watchdog the National Institute for Health and care Excellence (NICE) this morning issued new draft guidance recommending German family-owned drug major Boehringer Ingelheim’s Giotrif (afatinib) as an option for treating locally-advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in people whose tumors test positive for the EGFR-TK mutation and have not received a EGFR-TK inhibitor."


Editor's Note: In the US, this drug is called Gilotrif. It is meant for patients whose tumors have a mutation in the EGFR gene, as detected by molecular testing. Learn more about molecular testing to guide treatment decisions.

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The Pharma Letter  |  Mar 17, 2014

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Annual Lung Cancer Screening Recommended for High-Risk Individuals

Annual Lung Cancer Screening Recommended for High-Risk Individuals | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has published its final recommendations on lung cancer screening. The panel advises annual computed tomography (CT) scans for high-risk individuals (heavy smokers or former heavy smokers who have quit within the past 15 years) between 55 and 80 years of age. The recommendation is based on the results of a comprehensive review of the existing evidence and on modeling studies predicting the benefits and harms of different screening programs. Some experts have criticized the use of modeling data in developing the guidelines. Others consider practical concerns in implementing the recommendation, such as how to actually select those patients eligible and refer them to screening.

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Medical Xpress  |  Jan 2, 2014

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Advances in Screening and Surgery Improve Lung Cancer Survival

Advances in Screening and Surgery Improve Lung Cancer Survival | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

New U.S. guidelines recommending low-dose computed tomography (CT) scans to screen for lung cancer in high-risk individuals are leading to earlier detection and better survival for lung cancer patients. Screening is available without a prescription for people who have smoked the equivalent of at least a pack of cigarettes per day for 30 years. The scans can uncover lung cancer in early stages, when the chances for successful treatment are the highest. Recent medical advances have also made lung cancer surgery less invasive. Robotic surgeries can often be performed through small incisions in the chest, without the need to crack open ribs. These developments mean more lung cancer patients can undergo surgery and those who do have an easier recovery.

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Tampa Bay Times  |  Nov 29, 2013

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UK Health Authority Releases List of Recommended Tests for EGFR Mutation

UK Health Authority Releases List of Recommended Tests for EGFR Mutation | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The UK's National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has released a guidance document specifying which tests it recommends for detecting mutations of the EGFR gene in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Patients with EGFR mutations usually benefit more from treatment with EGFR inhibitors rather than traditional chemotherapy, while these drugs are less effective in patients without such mutations. Accurate detection of EGFR mutations is therefore very important. NICE recommends the therascreen EGFR RGQ PCR Kit, the cobas EGFR mutation test, Sanger sequencing of samples, or combined approaches that use Sanger sequencing for samples with more than 30% tumor cells, and one of the two other tests for samples with lower tumor cell density.

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National Institute for Health and Care Excellence | Aug 13, 2013

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Cancer Guidelines Don't Measure Up to IOM Standards for Clinical Practice

Cancer Guidelines Don't Measure Up to IOM Standards for Clinical Practice | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

In 2011, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) laid out standards for clinical practice in the hopes of ensuring that patients receive the highest quality of care. Among the standards are disclosing conflicts of interests, using systematic reviews of the literature, seeking external review, and regularly updating recommendations. A new study examined 169 clinical practice guidelines of the four leading causes of cancer death in the U.S. (lung, colorectal, prostate, and breast) to see how well they met the IOM’s standards. The results were discouraging; the average guidelines met just 2.75 of the 8 major criteria, and only 8.24 of 20 sub-criteria. However, the researchers who performed the investigation said that the guidelines were still very strong and questioned the pragmatism of the standards drawn up by the IOM, which could be overly strict.

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Medical News Today | Jun 14, 2013

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Medical News Today | Jun 14, 2013

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Medical News Today | Jun 14, 2013

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Testing for EGFR and ALK Mutations Recommended for All Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients

Testing for EGFR and ALK Mutations Recommended for All Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

All patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the lung, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), should be tested for mutations in the EGFR and ALK genes, according to guidelines developed by three prominent professional medical societies. Mutations in these genes predict a much higher likelihood of benefitting from treatment with EGFR inhibitors like erlotinib (Tarceva) and gefitinib (Iressa), or ALK inhibitors like crizotinib (Xalkori), respectively. The tests should be performed for all adenocarcinoma patients as soon as advanced disease is detected, regardless of sex, race, smoking history, or other clinical risk factors.

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MedPage Today | Apr 5, 2013

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American Cancer Society Recommends Lung Cancer Screening for High-Risk Patients

In its newly-released lung cancer screening guidelines, the American Cancer Society recommends that health care professionals discuss lung cancer screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 to 74 years, who have at least a 30-year history of pack-a-day cigarette smoking, and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. For these patients, who are at high risk of death from lung cancer, the benefits of being screened for lung cancer annually using a low-dose spiral CT scan outweigh the risks of screening. Lung cancer screening is not recommended for other, lower-risk patients, because abnormal findings on CT scans are often not related to cancer and can lead to unnecessary worry and invasive, potentially harmful, additional diagnostic tests.


Primary source:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.3322/caac.21172/full

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American Cancer Society | Jan 11, 2013

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Roche Lung Cancer Pill Gets Reprieve in UK Reversal

"Britain's health cost watchdog NICE on Friday reversed an earlier decision to limit the use of Roche's Tarceva cancer pill on the state health service in a move the drugmaker said would help around 2,000 patients a year.


"New draft guidance from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) now backs use of Tarceva for people with non-small-cell lung cancer that has progressed after chemotherapy in wider circumstances than originally suggested."

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Reuters  |  Apr 3, 2014

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Radiation from Medical Imaging May Increase Cancer Rates

Radiation from Medical Imaging May Increase Cancer Rates | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Medical imaging techniques that use high doses of radiation, including computed tomography (CT) scans, play an important role in modern medicine, including cancer screening. However, these procedures may themselves increase the incidence of cancer. Radiation exposure from medical imaging in the U.S. has increased more than sixfold between the 1980s and 2006. Several studies have linked multiple CT scans to increased cancer risk. Moreover, there are no official guidelines on the correct radiation doses for different medical imaging techniques, meaning that doses at one hospital may be up to 50 times higher than at another. Clear standards are needed to ensure that high-radiation imaging techniques are only used when clearly medically necessary and that the lowest feasible radiation doses are employed.

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New York Times  |  Jan 30, 2014

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New York Times  |  Jan 30, 2014

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New York Times  |  Jan 30, 2014

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Performing Lung Cancer Tests Out of Sequence Can Harm Patients

Performing Lung Cancer Tests Out of Sequence Can Harm Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

In patients with suspected localized lung cancer, clinical guidelines recommend sampling of the so-called mediastinal lymph nodes (lymph nodes located between the lungs) as the first invasive test. This procedure can often diagnose lung cancer and determine the cancer stage (how advanced the cancer is) at the same time; in around two-thirds of cases, it is sufficient to guide treatment decisions without any additional invasive tests. However, a recent study of 137 patients showed that doctors only followed the recommended sequence in 22% of cases. In all other cases, other invasive tests, such as needle biopsies of the lung masses or bronchoscopies (visual inspection of the airways), were performed first. As a result, these patients underwent more procedures overall and had a higher rate of complications.

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MedPage Today  |  Dec 4, 2013

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No Convincing Evidence That Supplements Help Prevent Cancer

No Convincing Evidence That Supplements Help Prevent Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A review by a panel of independent U.S. experts concludes that there is not enough evidence to recommend either for or against the use of most vitamin or mineral supplements to reduce the risk of cancer. However, the panel’s guidelines advise against the use of beta-carotene (a precursor of vitamin A) and vitamin E for cancer prevention, because there is relatively clear evidence that neither is effective. Indeed, beta-carotene supplements appear to increase lung cancer risk in people already at high risk of the disease. Instead, the panel recommends that healthy adults without nutritional deficiencies get their nutrients by eating a varied diet to minimize the risk of chronic disease, including cancer.

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MedPage Today | Nov 11, 2013

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MedPage Today | Nov 11, 2013

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MedPage Today | Nov 11, 2013

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The ASCO Post

The ASCO Post | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force posted its final evidence report and draft recommendation statement on screening for lung cancer. Based on the available evidence, the Task Force recommends screening people who are at high risk for lung cancer with annual low-dose CT (computed tomography) scans, which can prevent a substantial number of lung cancer-related deaths. This is a grade B draft recommendation.


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The ASCO Post. Jul 29, 2013.

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Open Letter Urges Administration to Provide Guidance to Protect Patient Access to Clinical Trials

Open Letter Urges Administration to Provide Guidance to Protect Patient Access to Clinical Trials | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Over 50 medical and advocacy organizations have jointly authored an open letter to the U.S. Administration calling for clear guidance to regulate the implementation of a statute protecting patient access to clinical trials. At present, only 6% of patients with severe chronic illness and fewer than 5% of cancer patients participate in clinical trials. This low participation rate hampers the progress of research necessary to develop much-needed new treatments. To promote and protect patient participation in clinical trials, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act ('Obamacare') contains a provision that mandates coverage of routine medical costs for people who participate in approved clinical trials. However, the details of implementing this provision are left up to the individual states, which may lead to uneven and unpredictable coverage. The letter points to a 2010 study showing that patients have been denied coverage of their clinical trial costs, even in states that already require such coverage. The letter signatories therefore call for federal guidelines for implementation to be issued before the provision goes into effect on January 1, 2014.

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ASCO in Action | Jun 18, 2013

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ASCO in Action | June 18, 2013

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ASCO in Action | June 18, 2013

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ASCO in Action | June 18, 2013

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Online Dietary Recommendations For Cancer Patients Are Inconsistent

Online Dietary Recommendations For Cancer Patients Are Inconsistent | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Dietary guidelines for cancer patients on the websites of even high-quality cancer treatment centers are inconsistent and contradictory, a recent survey showed. Of 21 institutions surveyed, only a minority provide their own online nutritional recommendations; the rest either link to external websites or provide no guidance at all. Half of the websites recommend a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet, while the other half recommend equal amounts of fat and carbohydrates. Several specific foods are recommended on some websites, but discouraged on others. Many of the guidelines are aimed at avoiding weight loss; however, weight loss is a significant risk only in some cancer types and obesity is associated with poor outcomes in other cancer types. The survey underlines the need for studies leading to consistent, cancer-type-specific nutritional guidelines for cancer patients. Research paper: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01635581.2013.757629

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical News Today | Mar 28, 2013

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