Lung Cancer Dispatch
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ASCO: Targeted Tx Combo Stalls NSCLC

ASCO: Targeted Tx Combo Stalls NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Adding bevacizumab (Avastin) to first-line targeted therapy delayed progression in a subgroup of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), an open-label trial showed.


"Progression-free survival was 46% better with bevacizumab plus erlotinib (Tarceva), at 16.0 months compared with 9.7 on erlotinib alone in an EGFR mutation-positive population (P=0.0015), Terufumi Kato, MD, of Kanagawa Cardiovascular and Respiratory Center in Yokohama, Japan, and colleagues found."


Editor's note: A combination of two targeted therapy drugs has shown promise for treating some patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The two drugs are called bevacizumab (brand name Avastin) and erlotinib (brand name Tarceva). The research described in this story found that the combination works better for patients whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene (as detected by molecular testing) than erlotinib alone.

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MedPage Today  |  Jun 3, 2014

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Cetuximab Plus Chemotherapy Effective in NSCLC

Cetuximab Plus Chemotherapy Effective in NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The addition of cetuximab to platinum-based first-line chemotherapy significantly improved outcomes in patients with advanced non–small cell lung cancer, according to results of a meta-analysis.


"The regimen also appeared well tolerated."

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Healio  |  Feb 10, 2014

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Rash from Tarceva May Herald Drug Effectiveness

Rash from Tarceva May Herald Drug Effectiveness | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Skin rash is a common side effect of the lung cancer drug erlotinib (Tarceva). However, a clinical trial suggests that this rash can be a good sign and can be used to guide dosing. One hundred twenty-four patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) received first-line treatment with Tarceva. The drug dose was gradually increased until patients developed a skin rash or other side effects that prevented further dose increases. Seventy percent of patients developed a skin rash. Patients who developed a skin rash survived longer than those who did not (6.8 months longer on average), even though they did not differ in how much the treatment reduced the growth of their tumors.

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News-Medical.Net  |  Dec 16, 2013

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New Clinical Trial for SCLC Now Enrolling Patients

New Clinical Trial for SCLC Now Enrolling Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

While medical research has produced significant treatment innovations for many cancer types, so far little has changed for small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Current treatment guidelines recommend chemotherapy with etoposide (Etopophos) and cisplatin (Platinol), drugs than are more than 30 years old. Relapse is common, and survival rates remain low. Now, the new  PINNACLE clinical trial will investigate a new drug against SCLC. Patients with extensive-stage SCLC who have never received any other cancer treatment will be treated with Etopophos and Platinol either by themselves or in combination with the new drug, OMP-59R5. The drug acts by inhibiting NOTCH, a protein involved in cell development and growth that plays a role in various cancers. For more information, call 646-888-4203.

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ScienceDaily | Nov 13, 2013

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Gilotrif Shows Effectiveness in Various Patient Populations with EGFR-Mutant Lung Cancer

Afatinib (Gilotrif) is a new lung cancer drug for people with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have mutations in the EGFR gene. The LUX-Lung 3 clinical trial demonstrated that Gilotrif is superior to chemotherapy as first-line treatment in a global population of patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC. The LUX-Lung 6 trial confirmed these findings specifically in an Asian population; Asia has a three times higher rate of EGFR-mutant NSCLC than Western countries. More recent evidence indicates that Gilotrif is as effective in patients with rare EGFR mutations as it is in those with common mutations. Finally, Gilotrif recently showed effectiveness in NSCLC patients whose cancer had spread to the brain.

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Moneylife | Oct 28, 2013

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Gilotrif to Be Commercially Available in the U.S. Soon

Afatinib (Gilotrif), a new drug for the treatment of some lung cancers, will become commercially available in the U.S. beginning the week of September 2. Gilotrif is approved as a first-line treatment for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have certain mutations in the EGFR gene. A companion diagnostic, the therascreen EGFR RGQ PCR Kit, can detect these specific EGFR mutations, so-called exon 19 deletions or exon 21 (L858R) substitutions. The makers of the drug will offer a patient support program to provide financial and other support to help patients who might otherwise not have access to Gilotrif.

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Yahoo! Finance | Aug 22, 2013

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Afatinib May Be Candidate for First-Line Treatment in Certain Lung Cancers

Results from the LUX-Lung 3 clinical trial show that afatinib appears to be well tolerated and more effective than chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have a mutation in the EGFR gene. Afatinib produced higher response rates and longer periods without cancer progression than cisplatin (Platinol) plus pemetrexed (Alimta), suggesting that it could be considered as a first-line therapy in advanced EGFR-mutant NSCLC. Afatinib, which is under priority review for approval by the FDA, may be effective in patients resistant to other EGFR inhibitors like erlotinib (Tarceva) and gefitinib (Iressa). However, no trials so far have directly compared afatinib with Tarceva or Iressa.

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Medscape | Jul 9, 2013

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Two Upcoming Clinical Trials to Investigate New Lung Cancer Drug OGX-427

OncoGenex Pharmaceuticals plans to launch two phase II clinical trials of its new cancer drug, OGX-427, in lung cancer patients. The Cedar trial will be conducted by the UK National Cancer Research Network and the UK Experimental Cancer Medicine Network at cancer centers throughout the UK. It will examine the effectiveness of OGX-427 in combination with chemotherapy in previously untreated patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The Spruce trial will be performed in the U.S. in collaboration with the Sarah Cannon Research Institute and will enroll patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC. OGX-427 inhibits Hsp27, a protein that is overexpressed in many cancer cells.

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Sacramento Bee | May 23, 2013

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New Clinical Trial of Drug OGX-427 Aims to Help Patients Ineligible for Targeted Therapies

OncoGenex Pharmaceuticals announced that it will begin the Spruce clinical trial, a phase II study investigating the use of their cancer drug OGX-427 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC will receive first-line treatment with chemotherapy using carboplatin (Paraplatin) and pemetrexed (Alimta), either with or without the addition of OGX-427. OGX-427 inhibits a protein called Hsp27, which is elevated in many cancers. The study investigators suggest that OGX-427 may be especially helpful for patients whose cancers lack certain mutations that would make them eligible for currently available targeted therapies.

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Pharmaceutical Business Review | Apr 12, 2013

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TKIs Are Effective First-Line Treatment in EGFR-Mutant Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

TKIs Are Effective First-Line Treatment in EGFR-Mutant Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Four phase III studies compared the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib (Tarceva) or gefitinib (Iressa) to standard chemotherapy as first-line treatment for EGFR-mutant advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). TKI treatment increased progression-free survival (ie, the length of time without the cancer worsening), but did not improve overall survival compared to chemotherapy. In one study, TKI-treated patients maintained a higher quality of life for longer than chemotherapy-treated patients. The findings suggest that TKI treatment should become the standard first-line treatment in advanced NSCLC with mutations in the EGFR gene.


Research paper: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11523-013-0258-9/fulltext.html

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Targeted Oncology | Jan 30, 2013

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Various Approaches to EGFR Inhibition Can Be Useful in Lung Cancer

Various Approaches to EGFR Inhibition Can Be Useful in Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A review of recent research discusses EGFR inhibition in the treatment of lung cancer. Scientists have now demonstrated that EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), either by themselves or combined with chemotherapy, are effective first-line treatments for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with EGFR mutations, and as second-line or maintenance treatments for all advanced NSCLC. TKIs like erlotinib (Tarceva) or gefitinib (Iressa), or anti-EGFR antibodies like cetuximab (Erbitux), may also enhance the effectiveness of radiation therapy for locally advanced NSCLC. Other biomarkers, such as KRAS mutations, may also help predict response to EGFR inhibition therapy.

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Biomarker Research | Jan 16, 2013

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FDA Considers Tarceva as First-Line Treatment for Some Lung Cancer Patients

The FDA will review the use of erlotinib (Tarceva) as a first-line treatment in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors carry a mutation in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene. Tarceva is already approved as a maintenance or second-line treatment after chemotherapy in advanced NSCLC, with or without the EGFR mutation. Patients with the EGFR mutation, which occurs in up to 10% of Western and 30% of Asian populations, may respond especially well to Tarceva treatment.

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News-Medical.Net | Jan 17, 2013

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Necitumumab Plus Chemotherapy Shows Overall Survival Benefit in Patients With Squamous NSCLC

Necitumumab Plus Chemotherapy Shows Overall Survival Benefit in Patients With Squamous NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A large phase III study investigating necitumumab (IMC-11F8) in combination with gemcitabine and cisplatin as first-line treatment for advanced squamous non–small cell lung cancer show a statistically significant improvement in overall survival of patients with stage IV disease.


"Patients receiving necitumumab plus chemotherapy had a median survival of 11.5 months compared to 9.9 months for patients treated with chemotherapy alone.


"Progression-free survival and disease control rate were also significantly improved."


Editor's note: This story is about a clinical trial that is testing the effectiveness of a new treatment for lung cancer patients. So far, the trial has found that the treatment is promising for people with stage IV squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To learn more about clinical trials, and the risks and advantages for patients who participate in them, click here.

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The ASCO Post  |  May 16, 2014

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NICE to Bar Second-Line Use of Tarceva

NICE to Bar Second-Line Use of Tarceva | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A proposal by (National Health Service) NHS cost regulators to no longer back the second-line use of Tarceva (erlotinib) to treat relapsed non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has angered the drug's manufacturer Roche and will no doubt come as a shock to patients.


"Following a review of existing guidance, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has decided that treatment with Tarceva after first-line therapy has failed is no longer a cost-effective option for the NHS.

 

"According to Roche, the move means that more than 1,000 patients in England and Wales every year will be at risk from being left without an active second-line treatment option."

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PharmaTimes  |  Feb 4, 2014

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Four-Drug Combination Shown to Be Safe and Effective for NSCLC

Four-Drug Combination Shown to Be Safe and Effective for NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A combination of the drugs carboplatin (Paraplatin), paclitaxel (Taxol/Abraxane), cetuximab (Erbitux), and bevacizumab (Avastin) has demonstrated effectiveness against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a phase II clinical trial. One hundred two patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC received the four-drug combo as a first-line treatment. Tumors shrank in 56% of patients and stopped growing in an additional 21%. Patients went an average of 7 months without their cancer progressing; the average survival time was 15 months. Four treatment-related deaths occurred, including two due to hemorrhage (heavy bleeding), which can be a rare but serious effect of Avastin treatment. This side effect profile was within the predefined safety margin. A phase III trial further investigating this drug combination for NSCLC is currently enrolling participants.

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MedwireNews  |  Dec 2, 2013

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Erbitux-Avastin Combination Plus Chemotherapy in Lung Cancer Is Safe and Effective

Erbitux-Avastin Combination Plus Chemotherapy in Lung Cancer Is Safe and Effective | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Combining cetuximab (Erbitux), bevacizumab (Avastin), and traditional chemotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) appeared to be safe and effective in a phase II clinical trial. Patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC received Erbitux and Avastin in addition to carboplatin (Paraplatin) and paclitaxel (Taxol/Abraxane) as first-line treatment, followed by maintenance treatment with Erbitux and Avastin. Tumors shrank in 56% of patients and stopped growing in an additional 21%. Serious side effects were relatively rare; the rate was comparable to that of either Erbitux or Avastin alone. Both Erbitux and Avastin have shown efficacy in NSCLC by themselves, but may be more effective when given together. An ongoing phase III clinical trial will further investigate this drug combination.

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Medical News Today | Nov 5, 2013

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Alimta Offers Only Limited Advantage in Lung Cancer Study

The recent PointBreak clinical trial compared two treatment regimens for non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Previously untreated patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC received initial treatment with carboplatin (Paraplatin), bevacizumab (Avastin), and either pemetrexed (Alimta) or paclitaxel (Taxol/Abraxane). The Alimta-treated group was then given maintenance treatment with Alimta and Avastin, while the other patients received Avastin only. Alimta treatment was associated with slightly longer times until the cancer progressed again (average 6.0 months, compared to 5.6 in the Alimta-free regimen). However, overall survival did not differ between the groups. The two regimens differed in what specific side effect were most common, but had similar overall toxicities and were generally tolerable.

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MedPage Today | Oct 21, 2013

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FDA Approves Afatinib/Gilotrif for Lung Cancer Treatment

Based on the positive results of a recent clinical trial, the FDA approved afatinib for first-line treatment of patients with late-stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have a mutation in the EGFR gene. The drug, which will be marketed under the name Gilotrif, is specifically intended for patients with two particular EGFR mutations: exon 19 deletion and exon 21 L858R substitution. The FDA also approved the therascreen EGFR RGQ PCR Kit, a companion diagnostic used to test for EGFR mutations. Afatinib differs from other EGFR inhibitors like erlotinib (Tarceva) and gefitinib (Iressa) in that it irreversibly destroys the EGFR protein, instead of just reversibly blocking it, and also inhibits several other related proteins.

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Food and Drug Administration (FDA) | July 12, 2013

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Adding Paraplatin to Alimta Increases Survival in Lung Cancer Study

Adding Paraplatin to Alimta Increases Survival in Lung Cancer Study | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Results from a phase III clinical trial suggest that adding carboplatin (Paraplatin) to pemetrexed (Alimta) can improve outcomes in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Over 200 patients with advanced NSCLC received first-line treatment with Alimta either by itself or in combination with Paraplatin. The combination of the two chemotherapy agents extended the time before the cancer started growing again, and prolonged survival compared to Alimta alone. However, the combination treatment group had a higher incidence of serious side effects and four treatment-associated deaths.

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Healio | June 24, 2013

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FDA Approves Expanded Use and Companion Diagnostic for Tarceva

The FDA has approved the use of erlotinib (Tarceva) as a first-line treatment for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have a mutation in the EGFR gene. Tarceva, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that inhibits EGFR, had already been approved for patients with advanced NSCLC as a second- or later-line treatment if at least one chemotherapy regimen had failed, or as maintenance treatment if their disease had not progressed after four cycles of chemotherapy. At the same time, the FDA approved, for the first time, a test for EGFR mutations, the cobas EGFR Mutation test. The test enables doctors to identify which patients have EGFR mutations and are therefore candidates for first-line treatment with Tarceva, making it a so-called 'companion diagnostic' for Tarceva.

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ASCO Post | May 14, 2013

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Systemic Chemotherapy Is Effective in Small Cell Lung Cancer with Brain Metastases

Between one-tenth and one-fourth of patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) have brain metastases (cancer that has spread to the brain) when they are first diagnosed; up to half will develop them at some point during the course of their disease. There have not been many studies on the use of systemic chemotherapy (ie, chemotherapy in which drugs are allowed to circulate throughout the body) in these patients, but research suggests that it is an effective first- or second-line treatment. Systemic chemotherapy is especially recommended for SCLC patients with brain metastases who do not yet show symptoms.

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Bulletin du Cancer | Jan 1, 2013

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New Guide to Tarceva as First-Line Treatment in EGFR-Mutant Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

New Guide to Tarceva as First-Line Treatment in EGFR-Mutant Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Erlotinib (Tarceva) was recently approved in the EU as a first-line treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients with mutations in the EGFR gene. In these patients, this recently published guide explains, Tarceva is better tolerated than standard chemotherapy, has higher treatment response rates, and results in longer time periods without the cancer worsening. However, Tarceva does not benefit patients without EGFR mutations, its effect on overall survival has not yet been clearly determined, and the risk of serious side effects requires careful patient monitoring.

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Molecular Diagnosis & Therapy | Jan 19, 2013

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Study Suggests Iressa Effective for Elderly Patients with EGFR-Mutant Lung Cancer

A retrospective study in Japan examined 55 patients age 75 years or over with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who had a mutation in the EGFR gene and received gefitinib (Iressa) as first-line therapy. The treatment was generally well-tolerated, and patients experienced longer periods without cancer progression (median: 13.8 months) and longer overall survival (median: 29.1 months) than commonly reported for similar patients. While studies using control groups will need to confirm that Iressa is indeed more effective than standard chemotherapy or a placebo, these findings suggest that Iressa may be a preferable first-line treatment in elderly patients with advanced EGFR-mutant NSCLC.

 

Research paper: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12032-012-0450-2/fulltext.html

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Medical Oncology | Jan 13, 2013

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