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General Oncology - Six-Gene Signature Predicts Survival After Targeted Therapy for NSCLC

General Oncology - Six-Gene Signature Predicts Survival After Targeted Therapy for NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The presence of a six-gene profile in the microRNA of patients with advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) predicts reduced survival likelihood after first-line treatment with targeted therapy followed by chemotherapy for disease progression, indicate research results.


"While the findings 'should be further validated', the researchers believe their analysis 'supports the hypothesis that circulating [microRNA's] may further be developed as predictive markers for EGFR-targeted treatment' in an NSCLC population whose response to epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors is unknown."


Editor's note: This story describes a new, blood test-based method by which oncologists may be able to predict the effects of targeted therapy treatment on the survival of patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Specifically, it may be able to predict the effects of first-line treatment with drugs known as EGFR inhibitors, which are prescribed to people whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene, as detected by molecular testing. In a study with volunteer patients, scientists took blood samples just before and just after the patients began taking the drugs bevacizumab or erlotinib. The scientists identified six different kinds of a molecule called microRNA that, if present, were associated with a lower chance of survival (29 months versus more than 45 months). More testing will be needed to determine if this six-gene signature can be used widely; it would be a non-invasive alternative to making predictions and monitoring treatment effectiveness using repeat tumor biopsies.

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medwireNews  |  June 20, 2014

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At ASCO, Next-Gen EGFR Inhibitors Show Early Promise in Lung Cancer Patients with T790M Mutations

"Next-generation EGFR inhibitors for treating metastatic non-small cell lung cancer patients who have acquired resistance to first-generation drugs in this class accurately hit mutant EGFR tumor cells and caused fewer serious side effects, early data presented at a major cancer conference showed.


"Researchers at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's annual meeting here this week, presented preliminary data from human studies on three next-generation EGFR inhibitors: AstraZeneca's AZD9291, Clovis Oncology's CO-1686, and Hanmi Pharmaceutical's HM61713. All three agents showed promising activity against patients who had EGFR mutations, had received prior treatment with a first-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor – such as Roche's Tarceva (erlotinib) and AstraZeneca's Iressa (gefinitib) – and had T790M mutations."


Editor's note: For a more reader-friendly explanation of these new drugs, check out the "Drug resistance" section of our Chief Scientist's latest blog post.

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GenomeWeb  |  Jun 4, 2014

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ASCO: Targeted Tx Combo Stalls NSCLC

ASCO: Targeted Tx Combo Stalls NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Adding bevacizumab (Avastin) to first-line targeted therapy delayed progression in a subgroup of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), an open-label trial showed.


"Progression-free survival was 46% better with bevacizumab plus erlotinib (Tarceva), at 16.0 months compared with 9.7 on erlotinib alone in an EGFR mutation-positive population (P=0.0015), Terufumi Kato, MD, of Kanagawa Cardiovascular and Respiratory Center in Yokohama, Japan, and colleagues found."


Editor's note: A combination of two targeted therapy drugs has shown promise for treating some patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The two drugs are called bevacizumab (brand name Avastin) and erlotinib (brand name Tarceva). The research described in this story found that the combination works better for patients whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene (as detected by molecular testing) than erlotinib alone.

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MedPage Today  |  Jun 3, 2014

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Proteomic Signature for EGFR Inhibitor Therapy Predicts Survival Benefit of Second-Line Chemotherapy vs Erlotinib in NSCLC

Proteomic Signature for EGFR Inhibitor Therapy Predicts Survival Benefit of Second-Line Chemotherapy vs Erlotinib in NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"There are conflicting data on whether epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy is beneficial in second-line treatment of lung cancer patients with unknown or wild-type EGFR status. In a phase III trial (PROSE) reported in The Lancet Oncology, Gregorc et al assessed the predictive value of a proteomic signature serum protein test for likely outcome of EGFR inhibitor therapy in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving second-line therapy with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib (Tarceva) vs chemotherapy. They found that the test was predictive of differential survival benefit for erlotinib vs chemotherapy, with patients classified by the test as likely to have poor outcome on EGFR inhibitor therapy having better outcome on chemotherapy."

"Overall survival was significantly better with chemotherapy among patients with a proteomic classification of poor, whereas there was no difference between chemotherapy and erlotinib in patients with a classification of good."

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The ASCO Post  |  May 22, 2014

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Drug Combo May Knock Down Lung Cancer

Drug Combo May Knock Down Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Some drug-resistant cancers of the lung, pancreas and breast might be made vulnerable again by treating them with a medication already approved for another type of cancer, according to a new study led by scientists at UC San Diego.


"Researchers at UCSD Moores Cancer Center said they plan to start a clinical trial to test the use of Velcade for lung cancer in about six months. This quick start is possible because the drug is currently on the market, said Dr. Hatim Husain, an author of the study who is designing the clinical trial. For more information about the trial, call (858) 822-5182."


Editor's note: Clinical trials can be important treatment options for some patients. This one might be particularly appropriate for people who have taken the drug Tarceva (erlotinib) but became resistant to it. The drug combination being tested in this clinical trial has previously shown disappointing results, but the researchers are hopeful that by using molecular testing to identify patients who are more likely to benefit, they may be able to successfully use the treatment. Learn more about clinical trials here.

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The San Diego Union-Tribune  |  Apr 20, 2014

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ELCC 2014 News: Efficacy and Safety of Targeted Therapy in Elderly Patients With Lung Cancer Adenocarcinoma

"Clinical records of elderly patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) show that treatment with bevacizumab seems to be safe and effective in patients with controlled pre-existing cardiovascular disease and good performance status. Furthermore, another targeted agent, erlotinib, represents a valuable treatment option in elderly NSCLC patients with co-morbidities, especially if they harbour EGFR mutations. The data were presented by Prof. Kostas Syrigos on behalf of colleagues from the Oncology Unit, Sotiria General Hospital, Athens School of Medicine, Athens, Greece in a general poster session at the 4th European Lung Cancer Conference (26-29 March 2014, Geneva, Switzerland)."

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ESMO  |  Mar 27, 2014

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Committee: NSCLC Study Should be Halted Due to Lack of Efficacy

Committee: NSCLC Study Should be Halted Due to Lack of Efficacy | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"An independent data monitoring committee recommended that a phase 3 study designed to evaluate the combination of onartuzumab and erlotinib in a subset of patients with non–small cell lung cancer be stopped due to lack of clinically meaningful efficacy, according to a press release issued by the drugs’ manufacturer.


"The randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled MetLung study compared the humanized monoclonal antibody onartuzumab (MetMab, Genentech) plus the protein kinase inhibitor erlotinib(Tarceva, Genentech) vs. erlotinib alone in patients with previously treated advanced NSCLC whose tumors were MET-positive."

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Healio  |  Mar 3, 2014

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NICE to Bar Second-Line Use of Tarceva

NICE to Bar Second-Line Use of Tarceva | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A proposal by (National Health Service) NHS cost regulators to no longer back the second-line use of Tarceva (erlotinib) to treat relapsed non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has angered the drug's manufacturer Roche and will no doubt come as a shock to patients.


"Following a review of existing guidance, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has decided that treatment with Tarceva after first-line therapy has failed is no longer a cost-effective option for the NHS.

 

"According to Roche, the move means that more than 1,000 patients in England and Wales every year will be at risk from being left without an active second-line treatment option."

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PharmaTimes  |  Feb 4, 2014

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Lung Cancer Drug BGB324 May Counteract Drug Resistance

Lung Cancer Drug BGB324 May Counteract Drug Resistance | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The protein Axl has been associated with cell transformation processes that contribute to the spread of cancer through the body and to cancers becoming drug resistant. A recent study investigated the effect of the Axl inhibitor BGB324 on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells that had become resistant to EGFR inhibitors like erlotinib (Tarceva). BGB324 restored the effectiveness of EGFR inhibitors against these cancer cells, which had been grown either in a matrix or as tumors in mice. BGB324 also appeared to enhance the effectiveness of the chemotherapy drug docetaxel (Taxotere) and of bevacizumab (Avastin). BGB324 may therefore be a promising new candidate for treating drug-resistant NSCLC. The drug will be tested in a phase Ib clinical trial for NSCLC in 2014.

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Medical News Today  |  Jan 13, 2014

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Effect of New Lung Cancer Drug Depends on MET Protein Expression Levels

Effect of New Lung Cancer Drug Depends on MET Protein Expression Levels | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The cell protein MET is overexpressed in more than half of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors. MET overexpression is associated with worse prognoses and plays a role in drug resistance to EGFR inhibitors like erlotinib (Tarceva). A recent clinical trial examined the effects of onartuzumab, which inhibits MET function, on recurrent NSCLC. Patients received either onartuzumab and Tarceva or Tarceva only. In patients who overexpressed MET, adding onartuzumab increased the time until cancer progression and prolonged overall survival. In contrast, in patients without MET overexpression, adding onartuzumab worsened outcomes. This finding highlights the importance of diagnostic testing in choosing the best cancer treatment. A clinical trial investigating the onartuzumab-Tarceva combination in MET-overexpressing patients only is currently enrolling participants.

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ASCO Post | Oct 10, 2013

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MET Inhibitor Fails to Prolong Life in NSCLC Trial

MET Inhibitor Fails to Prolong Life in NSCLC Trial | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A clinical trial of a MET inhibitor has been stopped because the drug doesn't keep people with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) alive longer, researchers reported at the 2013 European Cancer Congress in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The phase III trial included 1,048 people with NSCLC, where half were given the MET inhibitor tivantinib, in combination with erlotinib, which inhibits a protein linked to abnormal cell division. Although tivantinib did not extend life, it did keep tumors from growing for awhile (3.6 mo with this drug vs 1.9 mo without it). Now, the researchers are analyzing the results to see if tivantinib benefitted people with tumors that make too much of the MET protein.

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European Society For Medical Oncology│Sep 29, 2013

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A new oral drug may help a subset of patients with NS|CL|C who have over expression of cmet

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Molecular Marker Predicts Response to Iressa and Tarceva

Molecular Marker Predicts Response to Iressa and Tarceva | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A molecule named Mig 6 may help predict how much a patient will benefit from EGFR inhibitors like Tarceva (erlotinib) or Iressa (gefitinib). Preliminary results from an ongoing study reveal that cancer cells that are resistant to EGFR inhibitors have high Mig 6 levels. In an animal model of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) without EGFR mutations, higher Mig 6 levels predicted more resistance to EGFR inhibitor treatment. Finally, NSCLC patients with low Mig 6 levels were more likely to survive for over a year after EGFR inhibitor treatments. Mig 6 may help identify patients who would most benefit from EGFR inhibitors.

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Medical Xpress | Sep 5, 2013

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Second-Line Chemotherapy More Effective Than Tarceva in Lung Cancer without EGFR Mutations

Second-Line Chemotherapy More Effective Than Tarceva in Lung Cancer without EGFR Mutations | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

EGFR inhibitors like erlotinib (Tarceva) are highly effective for most patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have mutations in the EGFR gene. However, results from the TAILOR clinical trial suggest that, in patients without EGFR mutations (who have so-called EGFR wild-type NSCLC), EGFR inhibitors may be less effective than chemotherapy as second-line treatment. Patients with advanced wild-type NSCLC who had previously been treated with platinum-based chemotherapy were given either Tarceva or the chemotherapy agent docetaxel (Taxotere). Average survival in the Taxotere-treated group (8.2 months) was longer than in the Tarceva group (5.4 months).

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Healio | Aug 21, 2013

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General Oncology - Survival Differences After Docetaxel, Erlotinib are EGFR Dependent

General Oncology - Survival Differences After Docetaxel, Erlotinib are EGFR Dependent | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Results from the DELTA trial indicate no significant differences in progression-free (PF) or overall survival (OS) after treatment with docetaxel versus erlotinib in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients unselected for their epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status.


"By contrast, in the subgroup of patients whose tumours were positive for EGFR mutations, PFS and OS were nonsignificantly longer in the erlotinib than the docetaxel group, whereas in those with wild-type tumours, docetaxel was significantly superior to erlotinib in terms of PFS, observe the researchers in the Journal of Clinical Oncology."


Editor's note: This story discusses the results of a clinical trial comparing the targeted drug erlotinib (aka Tarceva) with the chemotherapy drug docetaxel in volunteer patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the trial, patients whose tumors had mutations in the EGFR gene benefitted more from erlotinib than docetaxel, while patients without EGFR mutations (as detected by molecular testing) had better results from docetaxel.

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medwireNews  |  Jun 13, 2014

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Resistance to Lung Cancer Targeted Therapy Can be Reversed, Study Suggests

Resistance to Lung Cancer Targeted Therapy Can be Reversed, Study Suggests | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Up to 40 percent of lung cancer patients do not respond to a targeted therapy designed to block tumor growth—a puzzling clinical setback that researchers have long tried to solve. Now, scientists at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center and the National Cancer Institute have discovered why that intrinsic resistance occurs—and they pinpoint a drug they say could potentially reverse it."


"Their findings, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, found that over-expression of the growth protein Cripto-1 makes lung cancer cells resistant to the drug erlotinib (Tarceva®). Experiments in cell lines and in animals demonstrated that blocking Cripto-1 signaling transduction restored sensitivity to the drug, one of a number of EGFR inhibitors used in non-small cell lung carcinoma and other cancers."


Editor's note: Lung cancer patients who try the targeted therapy drug erlotinib (brand name Tarceva) may be intrinsically resistant to it; it has no effect on their tumor growth. Researchers have now found that abnormalities involving a gene called Cripto-1 can make a tumor resistant to Tarceva, and that drugs that block Cripto-1's role in tumor cells can restore sensitivity to Tarceva. These studies were done on human cancer cells in the lab and in animals, but a new clinical trial with volunteer patients will test whether a drug called AZD0424 might undo Tarceva resistance in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), allowing them to benefit from Tarceva treatment.

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 9, 2014

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No Progression-Free or Overall Survival Benefit With Second- or Third-Line Erlotinib vs Docetaxel in EGFR-Unselected Japanese NSCLC Patients

No Progression-Free or Overall Survival Benefit With Second- or Third-Line Erlotinib vs Docetaxel in EGFR-Unselected Japanese NSCLC Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"In a Japanese phase III trial (DELTA) reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Kawaguchi et al found that erlotinib (Tarceva) was associated with no progression-free survival or overall survival advantage as second- or third-line therapy in EGFR-unselected patients with non–small cell lung cancer.


"In this open-label trial, 301 patients with stage IIIB or IV NSCLC, previous treatment with one or two chemotherapy regimens, evaluable or measurable disease, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0 to 2 were randomly assigned between August 2009 and July 2012 to erlotinib at 150 mg daily (n = 150) or docetaxel at 60 mg/m2every 3 weeks (n = 151). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. In total, 109 patients (73%) in the erlotinib group and 90 (60%) in the docetaxel group had EGFR wild-type disease. Study treatment was third line in 19% and 14%, respectively."


Editor's note: This clinical trial tested a drug called erlotinib (brand name Tarceva), which is already known to be an effective treatment for lung cancer patients whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene. However, in this trial, the scientists were interested in whether erlotinib might help all patients, regardless of whether EGFR is mutated. The results show that erlotinib is no more effective than chemo for patients without EGFR mutations. But we recently posted another story about a protein test that may predict whether a patient without EGFR mutations might benefit from erlotinib treatment: http://www.cancercommons.org/news/proteomic-signature-for-egfr-inhibitor-therapy-predicts-survival-benefit-of-second-line-chemotherapy-vs-erlotinib-in-nsclc/.

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The ASCO Post  |  May 27, 2014

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Genprex Begins Phase II Clinical Trial for Lung Cancer

"Genprex, Inc. announced today that it has enrolled the first patient in a clinical trial evaluating its lead product candidate Oncoprex® in combination with erlotinib (Tarceva®) for late-stage lung cancer patients. Oncoprex is a targeted biologic incorporating the pan-kinase inhibitor TUSC2, which inhibits oncogenic kinases via multiple pathways.


"The trial is significant in that it seeks to determine if patients without the EGFR activating mutation as well as patients with the EGFR activating mutation whose cancer has progressed after erlotinib treatment can benefit from the Oncoprex + erlotinib combination therapy. While erlotinib is a blockbuster drug helping many cancer patients worldwide, research shows that the vast majority of patients who have lung cancers without the activating EGFR mutation are unlikely to benefit from erlotinib. Additionally, many patients with the activating EGFR mutation who respond to erlotinib therapy eventually become resistant to the therapy."


Editor's note: Clinical trials are studies done with volunteer patients to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of new treatments (learn more in our lung cancer KnowledgeBase). This clinical trial is testing a new targeted therapy drug called Oncoprex. When combined with the drug erlotinib (Tarceva), Oncoprex may help treat patients who usually do not benefit from erlotinib or who have grown resistant to it.

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Yahoo!  |  May 20, 2014

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Roche Lung Cancer Pill Gets Reprieve in UK Reversal

"Britain's health cost watchdog NICE on Friday reversed an earlier decision to limit the use of Roche's Tarceva cancer pill on the state health service in a move the drugmaker said would help around 2,000 patients a year.


"New draft guidance from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) now backs use of Tarceva for people with non-small-cell lung cancer that has progressed after chemotherapy in wider circumstances than originally suggested."

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Reuters  |  Apr 3, 2014

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Erlotinib and Gefitinib Offer Similar Benefit in EGFR-Mutated Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

Erlotinib and Gefitinib Offer Similar Benefit in EGFR-Mutated Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A retrospective study has shown that two targeted therapy drugs—erlotinib (Tarceva) and gefitinib (Iressa)—achieved similar outcomes among people with metastatic or recurrent non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring an EGFR mutation. These EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors have previously been reported to offer benefit over standard chemotherapy as first-line treatment of EGFR-positive advanced NSCLC. The study findings by Lim et al are published in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology.


"Erlotinib is used worldwide, and gefitinib is widely used in Asian countries and recently in Europe (only for patients with tumors harboring EGFR mutations) but not in the United States. Indirect comparisons of the two agents have resulted in inconsistency with regard to progression-free survival, and until now, the agents have not been compared head-to-head in patients with EGFR-positive NSCLC."


Editor's note: Erlotinib and gefitinib are targeted therapies. Learn more.

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The ASCO Post  |  Mar 26, 2014

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Gefitinib, Erlotinib Increased Risk for Interstitial Lung Disease in Patients with Advanced NSCLC

Gefitinib, Erlotinib Increased Risk for Interstitial Lung Disease in Patients with Advanced NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Patients treated with advanced non–small cell lung cancer treated with gefitinib and erlotinib demonstrated a significant increased risk for all-grade and fatal interstitial lung disease events, according to results of a systematic review and meta-analysis.


"Erlotinib (Tarceva, Genentech) and gefitinib (Iressa, AstraZeneca), both of which are oral epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, are commonly used during treatment of advanced NSCLC. However, the overall risk for interstitial lung disease events are not known."

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Healio  |  Feb 5, 2014

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Pfizer Cancer Drug Fails in Two Late Stage Studies

In a recent phase III clinical trial, the cancer drug dacomitinib was no more effective than a placebo at prolonging survival for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) for whom standard therapy had failed. Like the targeted drugs erlotinib (Tarceva) and gefitinib (Iressa), dacomitinib blocks the protein EGFR, but it also inhibits a number of similar, related proteins. Another trial compared dacomitinib to Tarceva in NSCLC patients who had previously received at least one EGFR inhibitor. Dacomitinib did not increase time without cancer worsening compared to Tarceva. Results from a third phase III trial, which compares dacomitinib to Iressa in NSCLC patients with EGFR mutations, are expected next year.

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Bloomberg Businessweek  |  Jan 27, 2014

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Rash from Tarceva May Herald Drug Effectiveness

Rash from Tarceva May Herald Drug Effectiveness | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Skin rash is a common side effect of the lung cancer drug erlotinib (Tarceva). However, a clinical trial suggests that this rash can be a good sign and can be used to guide dosing. One hundred twenty-four patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) received first-line treatment with Tarceva. The drug dose was gradually increased until patients developed a skin rash or other side effects that prevented further dose increases. Seventy percent of patients developed a skin rash. Patients who developed a skin rash survived longer than those who did not (6.8 months longer on average), even though they did not differ in how much the treatment reduced the growth of their tumors.

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News-Medical.Net  |  Dec 16, 2013

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Adding Tarceva to Avastin Maintenance Therapy Does Not Increase Lung Cancer Survival

Adding Tarceva to Avastin Maintenance Therapy Does Not Increase Lung Cancer Survival | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Results from the ATLAS clinical trial indicate that adding erlotinib (Tarceva) to maintenance therapy with bevacizumab (Avastin) does not increase survival in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with advanced NSCLC who had been successfully treated with chemotherapy and Avastin received continued treatment with Avastin plus either Tarceva or a placebo. In patients who received both Avastin and Tarceva, the cancer took longer to start progressing again than in the patients given only Avastin (4.8 vs 3.7 mo, on average), but overall survival was not significantly different. Moreover, patients treated with both Tarceva and Avastin experienced more side effects. However, the benefits of added Tarceva were greater in the subgroup of patients with mutations in the EGFR gene.

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MedPage Today | Oct 7, 2013

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Personalized Treatment Yields Results for Cancer Patients

Personalized Treatment Yields Results for Cancer Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Personalized cancer medicine uses genetic testing of patients’ tumors to guide individually tailored treatment decisions. Such tests can determine which chemotherapies would likely be most effective and whether the patient may benefit from novel drugs targeting specific mutations. One example is the case of Elizabeth Lacasia, who has advanced bronchioalveolar carcinoma, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Testing revealed that she does not have any of the mutations targeted by the new drugs. Based on her test results, she was treated with a combination of Tarceva (erlotinib) and Alimta (pemetrexed) following an alternating schedule that has been proven effective for people with her cancer type. Her cancer has been in remission for 2 years.

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Newswise | Sep 10, 2013

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Cancer Researcher: No Need for Further EGFR Inhibitor Versus Chemotherapy Trials

No more trials comparing EGFR inhibitors to chemotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) should be conducted, argues an editorial by cancer researcher Corey Langer. Eight separate trials have found that EGFR inhibitors like erlotinib (Tarceva), gefitinib (Iressa), and afatinib (Gilotrif) produce better results than chemotherapy in NSCLC patients who have mutations in the EGFR gene. No further confirmation is needed, Langer contends. Instead, research should focus on ways to overcome the drug resistance that many patients eventually develop to EGFR inhibitors, meaningfully extending overall survival in NSCLC, and directly comparing the relative effectiveness and safety of Tarceva, Iressa, and Gilotrif.

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Medscape | Sep 3, 2013

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