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Breath Analysis Offers Non-Invasive Method to Detect Early Lung Cancer

"Researchers are using breath analysis to detect the presence of lung cancer. Preliminary data indicate that this promising noninvasive tool offers the sensitivity of PET scanning, and has almost twice the specificity of PET for distinguishing patients with benign lung disease from those with early stage cancer."

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ScienceDaily  |  Apr 29, 2014

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Breath Test May Help Detect Lung Cancer

Breath Test May Help Detect Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new breath test may offer a noninvasive way to detect lung cancer, even in the early stages. In a recent study, researchers analyzed the breath of patients who had either early stage lung cancer or noncancerous lung growths. They assessed the levels of four carbonyls (a type of organic chemical) in the breath. Ninety-five percent of patients with elevated levels of three or four carbonyls had lung cancer, while 80% of patients without elevated carbonyl levels were cancer-free. When lung cancer was surgically removed, carbonyl levels dropped to normal. By following up on computed tomography (CT) scan findings with this breath test, patients without cancerous growths may be able to avoid invasive biopsies, while those with cancer could progress directly to surgery.

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HealthDay  |  Jan 28, 2014

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Genetic Test Can Predict Risk of Death in Lung Cancer

Genetic Test Can Predict Risk of Death in Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new test for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients may help guide treatment decisions. The myPlan Lung Cancer test analyzes gene expression in patients with early-stage lung adenocarcinoma, a type of NSCLC, to predict their chances of dying within the next 5 years. A study showed that patients with a high-risk myPlan Lung Cancer score had nearly double the risk of death (35%) than patients with a low-risk score (18%). myPlan Lung Cancer results were better predictors of survival than cancer stage; tumor size; or the patient's age, sex, or smoking status. More accurate risk predictions could help identify early-stage NSCLC patients for whom aggressive treatment after surgery would be advisable despite the possibility of side effects.

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MarketWatch | Oct 29, 2013

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Selenium Does Not Prevent Lung Cancer Recurrence

Selenium has been suggested to have preventative effects against lung cancer. In a recent clinical trial, patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that had been completely surgically removed were given either selenium supplements or a placebo for 2 years after surgery. Interim results showed that patients receiving selenium were no less likely to have their lung cancer return than those given a placebo. Because there were hints that selenium-treated patients may be indeed more likely to develop new tumors, the study was halted. Final analyses show no harm from taking selenium, but no protection against lung cancer either.

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Journal of Clinical Oncology | Sep 3, 2013

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Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy May Be Effective Option in Multiple Primary Lung Cancer

Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy May Be Effective Option in Multiple Primary Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A significant number of lung cancer patients develop more than one primary tumor. The tumors arise independently and are not cases of one original tumor spreading to other sites or recurring after removal. This condition, known as multiple primary lung cancer (MPLC), is often treated surgically. However, not all patients are eligible for surgery. A recent study retroactively examined the records of patients with early-stage MPLC who had been treated with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), a form of radiotherapy that uses high radiation doses over relatively few sessions, instead of surgery. Patients experienced good tumor control rates and almost half survived for 4 years or more. SABR may be an effective treatment option for patients with inoperable MPLC.

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Healio | Jul 22, 2013

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Analysis Highlights Most Cost-Effective Treatments for Early-Stage Lung Cancer

Researchers have constructed a model to assess the cost-effectiveness of different treatments for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) based on treatment costs, predicted life expectancy, and expected quality of life. Model simulations indicate that lobectomy (removal of an entire subsection of the lungs) is the most cost-effective treatment for patients whose cancer is clearly operable. For patients who are only borderline eligible for surgery due to poor health ('marginally operable'), who often cannot withstand lobectomy, a type of radiotherapy called stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), also known as stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), was found to be more cost-effective than wedge resection (removal of a small piece of lung containing the cancer).

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CancerNetwork | June 26, 2013

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PET Scans May Identify High-Risk, Early-Stage Lung Cancer Patients

Stage Ia non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is commonly treated with surgery alone. However, the cancer frequently recurs, and only 67% of stage Ia NSCLC patients survive for 5 years or more. Adjuvant chemotherapy (chemotherapy given as a secondary treatment in addition to surgery) may increase survival, but also has severe toxic side effects. Therefore, it is important to identify stage Ia patients with high risk of recurrence, for whom the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy would outweigh the drawbacks. A retrospective analysis of stage Ia NSCLC patients found that those with positive results from a scanning technique called a fluorodeoxyglucose PET (positron emission tomography) scan (FDG-PET) had significantly lower rates of survival. Patients with positive FDG-PET results may, therefore, be good candidates for adjuvant chemotherapy.

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MedPage Today | Apr 10, 2013

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Lobectomy Linked to Better Outcomes in Lung Cancer than Wedge Resection

Small, early-stage lung cancers can be removed using either wedge resection (removal of a small, wedge-shaped piece of lung that contains the cancer and a margin of healthy tissue around the cancer) or lobectomy (removal of the entire subsection, or lobe, of the lung that contains the cancer). A study of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that was less than 2 cm in diameter and had not spread to the lymph nodes (stage T1N0) showed that those who received lobectomy were more likely to remain cancer-free and had higher survival rates compared to those who received wedge resection. The study authors recommend lobectomy as the preferred treatment for small NSCLC tumors, with wedge resection reserved for patients whose lung function would be decreased too much by lobectomy.

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Minerva Chirurgica | Dec 2012

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New Genetic Test Helps Patients Choose Best Lung Cancer Treatment

New Genetic Test Helps Patients Choose Best Lung Cancer Treatment | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

In September, Southern California company Life Technologies released a new test that determines the risk of recurrence for lung cancer patients. The 14-gene, $3,995 test, called Pervenio, helps doctors decide how aggressively to treat early-stage lung cancer and whether chemotherapy or other post-surgery treatments are necessary. Though not yet covered by most insurance plans, Pervenio has already proven useful for individual patients since its release.

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San Francisco Chronicle | Nov 13, 2012

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Experts Say Palliative Care Underused in Cancer Care

Experts Say Palliative Care Underused in Cancer Care | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Integrating palliative care earlier in the disease process can improve quality of life and possibly survival for patients with advanced cancer, but its value is widely misunderstood, according to a recent review by palliative care experts in the New England Journal of Medicine.


"Most palliative care currently is provided at end of life due to its perceived association with hospice care, said the article, coauthored by experts from Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, the American Cancer Society, and Johns Hopkins University. But whereas hospice care provides comfort for patients in the last stages of an incurable disease, palliative care focuses on relieving symptoms and can be provided in concert with curative treatment at any stage in a serious illness."

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Cancer Network  |  Feb 6, 2014

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, February 6, 6:51 PM

Cancer Network  |  Feb 6, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, February 6, 6:51 PM

Cancer Network  |  Feb 6, 2014

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Gene Expression Pattern Predicts Risk in Early Lung Cancer

Gene Expression Pattern Predicts Risk in Early Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

In a past clinical trial, researchers identified a collection of 15 genes whose expression pattern predicted the relative risk of death in people with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Now, a new study has confirmed these findings in a larger, independent group of patients. Early-stage NSCLC patients who were classified into high- or low-risk groups based on testing the expression of the 15 genes differed significantly in their overall 5-year survival. These gene expression patterns may therefore help distinguish patients at higher risk who would benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy (chemotherapy given after tumor removal surgery), from lower-risk patients who could avoid the side effects of chemotherapy. Indeed, the Pervenio test, which looks at the expression of 14 genes, is already used to identify the patient who may benefit from aduvant chemotherapy.

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Medical News Today  |  Dec 9, 2013

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FDG-PET Distinguishes Low- and High-Risk Lung Cancer Patients After Radiotherapy

FDG-PET Distinguishes Low- and High-Risk Lung Cancer Patients After Radiotherapy | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scans may be able to detect early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who are at high risk of treatment failure after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). A retrospective study examined patients with early-stage NSCLC who were ineligible for or refused surgery and were instead treated with SBRT. Patients with lower FDG-PET readings prior to SBRT treatment survived longer, and those whose FDG-PET readings changed more after SBRT were less likely to experience treatment failure. FDG-PET scans may therefore help identify which patients are at lower or higher risk of recurrence; high-risk patients may opt for additional treatment and/or more frequent surveillance after treatment. FDG-PET has shown similar predictive value in early-stage NSCLC treated with surgery.

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MedPage Today | Sep 24, 2013

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Tissue Analysis May Help Predict Risk of Early-Stage Lung Cancer Returning

Tissue Analysis May Help Predict Risk of Early-Stage Lung Cancer Returning | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The tissue types present in early-stage lung adenocarcinomas, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), may help predict the chances of the cancer returning after surgery. A retrospective study examined outcomes among adenocarcinoma patients whose tumors were 2 cm in diameter or smaller. Patients whose tumors contained 5% or more of a so-called 'micropapillary' tissue structure had a higher risk of the cancer returning if they had just the tumor removed. This difference was not found in patients who underwent lobectomy (removal of an entire subsection of lung). The higher risk of recurrence in patients with 5%-plus micropapillary tissue in their tumor may make them better candidates for the more invasive lobectomy procedure.

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MedPage Today | Aug 7, 2013

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Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Is Safe and Effective in Early-Stage Lung Cancer

Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), a type of radiotherapy that uses high doses of radiation given over a comparatively small number of sessions, is the treatment of choice for patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who cannot undergo surgery because of other medical problems. However, until now the use of SBRT for these patients was based on limited evidence. A systematic study spanning several institutes found that SBRT (sometimes also called stereotactic ablative radiotherapy or SABR) for stage I NSCLC was safe and effective. Higher radiation doses were associated with better outcomes.

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International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer | Jul 1, 2013

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Low-Radiation CT Scan Superior for Detecting Lung Cancer Recurrences

Low-Radiation CT Scan Superior for Detecting Lung Cancer Recurrences | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new screening method may offer a better way to monitor recurrence after lung cancer surgery. Recurrence is common, but traditional screening methods, including chest x-rays and computed tomography (CT) scans, have significant drawbacks. A new minimal dose CT (MnDCT) scan reduces radiation exposure to no more than that of standard x-rays, but it maintains superior sensitivity. In a recent study, MnDCT detected 94% of cancer recurrences in patients who had received surgery to remove stage I or II lung cancer; x-rays caught only 21%. However, MnDCT has a high rate of false positives (ie, detecting lung cancer when none is actually present), which is of concern because recurrence may call for invasive and potentially dangerous follow-up procedures.

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Medical Xpress | May 6, 2013

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Variations in Certain Genes May Predict Clinical Outcomes in Early-Stage Lung Cancer

Early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is usually treated with surgical removal of the tumor. However, in up to 50% of patients, the cancer will return within 5 years. A study of genetic variations that affect the function of microRNAs (small molecules involved in gene expression) found that several of them, including variations in the FAS, FZD4, SP1, and DROSHA genes, were associated with higher or lower probabilities of cancer recurrence and survival. Tests for such microRNA-related genetic variations may eventually help identify high-risk, early-stage NSCLC patients who would benefit from additional treatment after surgery.

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Cancer Research | Feb 1, 2013

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Immune Cells May Predict Recurrence of Early-Stage Lung Cancer

Immune Cells May Predict Recurrence of Early-Stage Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Currently, stage I (early-stage) lung cancer is usually treated with surgical removal only, but in up to 27% of cases the cancer will return within 5 years. A recent study found that the presence and relative concentration of certain kinds of immune cells in tissue samples from stage I lung cancer patients could predict which patients were at higher risk of the cancer returning after surgery. In the future, testing early-stage lung cancer patients for these immune biomarkers may be used to indicate which patients should be followed more closely after surgery and possibly receive additional treatments with novel immune-based therapies.


Primary source: http://jco.ascopubs.org/cgi/doi/10.1200/JCO.2012.45.2052

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On Cancer | Jan 3, 2013

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