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Docetaxel Plus Ramucirumab Improves Outcomes in Advanced NSCLC

Docetaxel Plus Ramucirumab Improves Outcomes in Advanced NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The addition of ramucirumab to docetaxel improved outcomes over placebo with docetaxel as a second-line treatment of patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to results of the REVEL trial presented at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago.


“ 'Despite advancements in genomics and identification of predictive biomarkers such as EGFR mutations or ALK rearrangement, there is still no… targeted therapy for the majority of patients with squamous and non-squamous carcinoma,' said Maurice Pérol, MD, of the Cancer Research Center of Lyon in France. Ramucirumab specifically targets VEGFR-2 and inhibits angiogenesis, and it has been shown to improve outcomes in gastric cancer as monotherapy."


Editor's note: This article describes a treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that combines a new targeted drug called ramucirumab with the standard chemotherapy drug docetaxel. In a clinical trial to test the treatment in volunteer patients who had already received one previous treatment, it was found that ramucirumab plus docetaxel provided better patient outcomes than docetaxel plus a placebo.

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Cancer Network  |  Jun 19, 2014

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General Oncology - Survival Differences After Docetaxel, Erlotinib are EGFR Dependent

General Oncology - Survival Differences After Docetaxel, Erlotinib are EGFR Dependent | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Results from the DELTA trial indicate no significant differences in progression-free (PF) or overall survival (OS) after treatment with docetaxel versus erlotinib in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients unselected for their epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status.


"By contrast, in the subgroup of patients whose tumours were positive for EGFR mutations, PFS and OS were nonsignificantly longer in the erlotinib than the docetaxel group, whereas in those with wild-type tumours, docetaxel was significantly superior to erlotinib in terms of PFS, observe the researchers in the Journal of Clinical Oncology."


Editor's note: This story discusses the results of a clinical trial comparing the targeted drug erlotinib (aka Tarceva) with the chemotherapy drug docetaxel in volunteer patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the trial, patients whose tumors had mutations in the EGFR gene benefitted more from erlotinib than docetaxel, while patients without EGFR mutations (as detected by molecular testing) had better results from docetaxel.

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medwireNews  |  Jun 13, 2014

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Studies Reveal Potential New Targeted Therapies for Common, Hard-to-Treat Cancers

Studies Reveal Potential New Targeted Therapies for Common, Hard-to-Treat Cancers | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Positive results from four clinical trials of investigational targeted drugs for advanced ovarian, lung, and thyroid cancers, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia were highlighted today at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). Findings from the mid- and late-stage trials suggest new ways to slow disease progression and improve survival for patients who experience relapses or resistance to available treatments...


"Second-line treatment with ramucirumab plus standard docetaxel extends survival for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer: This phase III clinical trial marks the first time in a decade that a survival benefit has been achieved in second-line therapy for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer – findings that could impact the care of 60,000 patients each year in the United States."


Editor's note: Learn more about targeted therapy drugs for lung cancer.

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 2, 2014

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Synta Announces Results from Final Analysis of the GALAXY-1 Trial of Ganetespib in NSCLC

Synta Announces Results from Final Analysis of the GALAXY-1 Trial of Ganetespib in NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Synta Pharmaceuticals Corp. (NASDAQ: SNTA) today announced final results from the GALAXY-1 trial, a global, randomized, multi-center study designed to identify the patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with adenocarcinoma histology most likely to benefit from second-line treatment with the Company’s lead drug candidate, the Hsp90 inhibitor ganetespib, in combination with docetaxel versus docetaxel alone. Ganetespib is a next-generation inhibitor of the chaperone protein Hsp90, which is critical for the activation and stability of numerous proteins that drive cancer growth and proliferation. Ganetespib has been studied in over 1000 patients to date."


Editor's note: This story is about clinical trials designed to test the drug ganetespib in people with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The drug manufacturer (Synta) recently reported updated results for one of the trials, GALAXY-1. The results confirm that the researchers were able to identify patients who were most likely to benefit from a treatment that combines ganetespib with the chemotherapy drug docetaxel.

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Synta  |  May 8, 2014

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Xalkori More Effective than Chemotherapy As Second-Line Treatment in ALK+ Lung Cancer

Xalkori More Effective than Chemotherapy As Second-Line Treatment in ALK+ Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The ALK inhibitor crizotinib (Xalkori) has shown effectiveness in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have changes in the ALK gene that make the gene overactive (so-called 'ALK-positive' patients). A recent clinical trial compared Xalkori to chemotherapy as a second-line treatment in these patients. Over 300 patients with ALK-positive advanced NSCLC who had undergone one previous round of chemotherapy were treated either with Xalkori or one of the chemotherapy drugs pemetrexed (Alimta) or docetaxel (Taxotere). Tumors shrank in 65% of Xalkori-treated patients, compared to 20% of those receiving chemotherapy. The Xalkori-treated patients also went longer without their cancer worsening, experienced fewer symptoms, and reported higher quality of life.

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Medical Xpress  |  Jan 13, 2014

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New Clinical Trial Examines Lung Cancer Drug Bavituximab

New Clinical Trial Examines Lung Cancer Drug Bavituximab | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The makers of the cancer drug bavituximab are initiating the SUNRISE trial, a phase III clinical trial investigating the efficacy of the drug against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC whose cancer has progressed after first-line treatment will receive either bavituximab plus docetaxel (Taxotere) or Taxotere by itself. Bavituximab inhibits phosphatidylserine, a protein found on the surface of tumors and tumor-associated cells that acts to suppress the body’s immune reponse. By blocking phosphatidylserine’s action, bavituximab allows the immune system to continue attacking the cancer. To find out more, patients can go to www.sunrisetrial.com.

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Yahoo! Finance  |  Dec 30, 2013

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Positive Results For Vargatef in Lung Cancer Study

Positive Results For Vargatef in Lung Cancer Study | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

New clinical trial results suggest that adding the drug nintedanib (Vargatef) to second-line chemotherapy can improve survival for some patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with advanced NSCLC whose cancer had progressed after first-line chemotherapy received either Vargatef and the chemotherapy drug docetaxel (Taxotere) or Taxotere alone. On the whole, Vargatef was associated with slightly longer times without worsening of the cancer (3.4 months vs 2.7 in the Taxotere-only group), but no improvement in overall survival. However, in patients with lung adenocarcinoma, a subtype of NSCLC, the addition of Vargatef improved overall survival by over 2 months (12.6 months vs 10.3 with Taxotere alone). Vargatef disrupts the formation of new blood vessels that feed growing tumors.

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Clinical Oncology News  |  Oct, 2013

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New Clinical Trial Will Study Novel Lung Cancer Drug Vantictumab

New Clinical Trial Will Study Novel Lung Cancer Drug Vantictumab | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new clinical trial will investigate the safety of vantictumab (OMP-18R5), a new lung cancer drug targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs, the actively multiplying cells responsible for generating tumors, are thought to be central in cancer relapse by 'repopulating' tumors, even if the bulk of the tumors cells are destroyed during treatment. Vantictumab blocks the Wnt pathway, a key molecular signaling pathway used by CSCs. Patients with previously treated advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) will receive vantictumab in combination with the chemotherapy agent docetaxel (Taxotere). In addition to the safety of the drug combination, the trial will also investigate how effective it is and whether any biomarkers predict how well patients respond.

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MarketWatch  |  Nov 15, 2013

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Lung Cancer Drug Retaspimycin Fails Clinical Trial

A phase II clinical trial found no survival benefit for the lung cancer drug retaspimycin in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The trial examined NSCLC patients with a history of smoking who were given the chemotherapy agent docetaxel (Taxotere) either with or without retaspimycin. Adding retaspimycin did not improve overall survival in NSCLC patients in general or in the subset of patients with squamous cell carcinoma (a type of NSCLC closely linked to smoking). The company will complete enrollment in a separate study investigating retaspimycin in combination with everolimus (Afinitor) by the end of 2013, but will begin no further clinical trials with retaspimycin.

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Reuters | Sep 25, 2013

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Second-Line Chemotherapy More Effective Than Tarceva in Lung Cancer without EGFR Mutations

Second-Line Chemotherapy More Effective Than Tarceva in Lung Cancer without EGFR Mutations | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

EGFR inhibitors like erlotinib (Tarceva) are highly effective for most patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have mutations in the EGFR gene. However, results from the TAILOR clinical trial suggest that, in patients without EGFR mutations (who have so-called EGFR wild-type NSCLC), EGFR inhibitors may be less effective than chemotherapy as second-line treatment. Patients with advanced wild-type NSCLC who had previously been treated with platinum-based chemotherapy were given either Tarceva or the chemotherapy agent docetaxel (Taxotere). Average survival in the Taxotere-treated group (8.2 months) was longer than in the Tarceva group (5.4 months).

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Healio | Aug 21, 2013

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New Cancer Drug Ganetespib May Extend Survival in Late-Stage Lung Cancer

New Cancer Drug Ganetespib May Extend Survival in Late-Stage Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The new cancer treatment ganetespib produced encouraging results in a phase II/III clinical trial examining its effectiveness on late-stage lung adenocarcinoma, a form of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients received ganetespib in combination with docetaxel (Taxotere) or Taxotere alone. Ganetespib treatment resulted in longer overall survival (9.8 months compared to 7.4 months in Taxotere-only patients). Ganetespib inhibits a protein called Hsp90 that acts as a so-called molecular chaperone: it helps different proteins assume their final shape, thus allowing them to function. Many proteins 'chaperoned' by Hsp90 can drive tumor growth in cancer. Researchers hope that blocking Hsp90 with ganetespib will be effective even in patients who have developed mutations that make them resistant to other anticancer drugs, because even the mutated proteins likely still need Hsp90 to function. An ongoing phase III clinical trial seeks to confirm these results.

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Medical Xpress | Jun 3, 2013

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Taxotere-Afinitor Combination Only Modestly Effective in Advanced NSCLC

Taxotere-Afinitor Combination Only Modestly Effective in Advanced NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A phase II clinical trial examined the use of the chemotherapy drug docetaxel (Taxotere) combined with everolimus (Afinitor), a member of a family of drugs called mTOR inhibitors, as second- or third-line treatment in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The treatment was well tolerated, but only modestly effective compared to standard therapy in similar patients. The patients in the study had not been selected for any specific biomarkers; better effectiveness may be achieved in patients with relevant biomarkers.

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Journal of Thoracic Oncology | Feb 14, 2013

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First Success for KRAS Targeted Treatment

A phase II clinical trial found that the addition of selumetinib to docetaxel improves treatment of KRAS-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Mutated KRAS occurs in 20% of all NSCLC tumors and is more commonly reported in current and former smokers and white patients. This study marks the first time that a targeted KRAS treatment has proven successful in a clinical trial.

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The Lancet Oncology | Jan 2013

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FDA Warns Docetaxel May Cause Alcohol Intoxication Symptoms After Treatment

FDA Warns Docetaxel May Cause Alcohol Intoxication Symptoms After Treatment | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The FDA has issued an alert to health care professionals that docetaxel contains ethanol, which may cause patients to experience intoxication during and after treatment.


"The FDA is currently revising the labels of all docetaxel drug products to warn about this potential risk. Health care professionals should consider the alcohol content of docetaxel when prescribing or administering the drug to patients, especially in those whom alcohol intake should be avoided or reduced and when using it concomitantly with other medications."

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Healio  |  Jun 20, 2014

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Healio  |  Jun 20, 2014

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Healio  |  Jun 20, 2014

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Cyramza Yields a Modest Survival Benefit in Second-line NSCLC

"Cyramza™ (ramucirumab, IMC-1121B; Eli Lilly) is a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody directed against the extracellular domain of VEGFR-2. It was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for advanced gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. On February 19, 2014, Lilly announced via press release that the REVEL trial was positive for both overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) benefit. Results from the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase III REVEL trial (NCT01168973) were reported at the 2014 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). The trial evaluated docetaxel with or without Cyramza in squamous or non-squamous Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients following disease progression after one prior platinum-based therapy."


Editor's note: A new targeted drug called Cyramza (aka ramucirumab) shows promise as a potential treatment for people with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a clinical trial, scientists tested the drug on volunteer patients with stage IV NSCLC. Compared to standard chemotherapy alone, patients who were treated with chemo plus Cyramza lived longer and had more time pass before their cancer worsened.

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OBR  |  Jun 3, 2014

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No Progression-Free or Overall Survival Benefit With Second- or Third-Line Erlotinib vs Docetaxel in EGFR-Unselected Japanese NSCLC Patients

No Progression-Free or Overall Survival Benefit With Second- or Third-Line Erlotinib vs Docetaxel in EGFR-Unselected Japanese NSCLC Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"In a Japanese phase III trial (DELTA) reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Kawaguchi et al found that erlotinib (Tarceva) was associated with no progression-free survival or overall survival advantage as second- or third-line therapy in EGFR-unselected patients with non–small cell lung cancer.


"In this open-label trial, 301 patients with stage IIIB or IV NSCLC, previous treatment with one or two chemotherapy regimens, evaluable or measurable disease, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0 to 2 were randomly assigned between August 2009 and July 2012 to erlotinib at 150 mg daily (n = 150) or docetaxel at 60 mg/m2every 3 weeks (n = 151). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. In total, 109 patients (73%) in the erlotinib group and 90 (60%) in the docetaxel group had EGFR wild-type disease. Study treatment was third line in 19% and 14%, respectively."


Editor's note: This clinical trial tested a drug called erlotinib (brand name Tarceva), which is already known to be an effective treatment for lung cancer patients whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene. However, in this trial, the scientists were interested in whether erlotinib might help all patients, regardless of whether EGFR is mutated. The results show that erlotinib is no more effective than chemo for patients without EGFR mutations. But we recently posted another story about a protein test that may predict whether a patient without EGFR mutations might benefit from erlotinib treatment: http://www.cancercommons.org/news/proteomic-signature-for-egfr-inhibitor-therapy-predicts-survival-benefit-of-second-line-chemotherapy-vs-erlotinib-in-nsclc/.

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The ASCO Post  |  May 27, 2014

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Lilly Lung Cancer Drug Improves Survival in Late-Stage Trial

Lilly Lung Cancer Drug Improves Survival in Late-Stage Trial | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"An experimental cancer drug developed by Eli Lilly and Co, touted by some to be the company's next blockbuster, significantly improved survival rates in lung cancer patients...


"The late-stage lung cancer trial compared a combination of ramucirumab and a common chemotherapy drug, docetaxel, with a combination of a placebo and docetaxel in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer.


"The trial, known as Revel, showed that ramucirumab significantly improved overall survival rates as well as improving survival rates without the cancer worsening."

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Reuters  |  Feb 19, 2014

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Lung Cancer Drug BGB324 May Counteract Drug Resistance

Lung Cancer Drug BGB324 May Counteract Drug Resistance | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The protein Axl has been associated with cell transformation processes that contribute to the spread of cancer through the body and to cancers becoming drug resistant. A recent study investigated the effect of the Axl inhibitor BGB324 on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells that had become resistant to EGFR inhibitors like erlotinib (Tarceva). BGB324 restored the effectiveness of EGFR inhibitors against these cancer cells, which had been grown either in a matrix or as tumors in mice. BGB324 also appeared to enhance the effectiveness of the chemotherapy drug docetaxel (Taxotere) and of bevacizumab (Avastin). BGB324 may therefore be a promising new candidate for treating drug-resistant NSCLC. The drug will be tested in a phase Ib clinical trial for NSCLC in 2014.

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Medical News Today  |  Jan 13, 2014

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Clinical Trial Continues to Examine Lung Cancer Vaccine

Clinical Trial Continues to Examine Lung Cancer Vaccine | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new phase II/III clinical trial will further investigate the effectiveness of the lung cancer vaccine tergenpumatucel-L (HyperAcute-Lung immunotherapy, or HAL) against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with advanced NSCLC that has resisted previous treatment will receive either HAL or the chemotherapy drug docetaxel (Taxotere). HAL consists of lung cancer cells that have been modified to prevent them from growing. A mouse gene has been inserted into these cells, causing them to express a molecule on their surface that human immune systems recognize as foreign. When the cells are injected into humans, they provoke a strong immune response, which stimulates the immune system to also attack the patient’s own lung cancer cells. A previous phase I/II trial of HAL had produced promising results.

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Medical Xpress  |  Dec 19, 2013

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FDA Grants Regular Approval to Xalkori for Treatment of ALK-Mutant Lung Cancer

FDA Grants Regular Approval to Xalkori for Treatment of ALK-Mutant Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted regular approval to the drug crizotinib (Xalkori) for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who have mutations in the ALK gene. Xalkori received accelerated approval for this application in August 2011. Regular approval was awarded based on the results of a study examining patients with advanced NSCLC whose cancer had progressed despite first-line chemotherapy. Patients treated with Xalkori went an average of 7.7 months without further cancer worsening, compared to 3.0 months in those receiving the chemotherapy agents pemetrexed (Alimta) or docetaxel (Taxotere). Tumors shrank in 65% of the Xalkori-treated patients, compared to 20% with Alimta or Taxotere. However, overall survival did not differ between the Xalkori group and the chemotherapy group.

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ASCO Post  |  Nov 21, 2013

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Trial Results for New Lung Cancer Drug Ganetespib Leave Some Skeptical

Trial Results for New Lung Cancer Drug Ganetespib Leave Some Skeptical | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The GALAXY-1 clinical trial examines patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), receiving either ganetespib (a new cancer drug) and docetaxel (Taxotere, a chemotherapy drug) or Taxotere alone as second-line treatment. Recent interim results show ganetespib-treated patients surviving 10.4 months on average (vs 8.4 months in the Taxotere-only group) and experiencing a 10% reduction in the risk of death. This is a smaller difference than was seen in preliminary results in September, 2012 and June, 2013 (31% and 18% reduction in risk of death, respectively). It is also unclear whether the effect is indeed caused by ganetespib or due to chance. However, the drug’s makers emphasize that ganetespib may be more effective in certain patient subgroups.

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The Street | Oct 27, 2013

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FDA Puts Lung Cancer Drug Ganetespib on Fast Track

FDA Puts Lung Cancer Drug Ganetespib on Fast Track | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Ganetespib, a potential new treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), has been granted Fast Track status by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Fast Track status, reserved for drugs aimed at serious conditions with unmet treatment needs, provides for closer FDA guidance during the drug development process and quicker review for approval. Two clinical trials, GALAXY-1 and GALAXY-2, are currently examining the use of ganetespib in combination with the chemotherapy agent Taxotere (docetaxel) for treating advanced lung adenocarcinoma, a type of NSCLC. Ganetespib acts by blocking Hsp90, a protein that facilitates several components of tumor development and spread.

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MarketWatch | Sep 12, 2013

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New Clinical Trial Investigates Novel Lung Cancer 'Nanomedicine'

New Clinical Trial Investigates Novel Lung Cancer 'Nanomedicine' | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new phase II clinical trial is investigating the new cancer drug BIND-014 as a second-line treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). BIND-014 is part of a group of 'nanoengineered' drugs called Accurins, which consist of: 1) targeting particles that direct them preferentially to the disease site–in the case of BIND-014, these particles bind to PSMA, a protein expressed on cancer cells; 2) a 'stealth layer' protecting them from the body's immune system; 3) a controlled-release structure ensuring that the 'payload' is released at the optimal rate; and 4) the drug's actual payload–in the case of BIND-014, the chemotherapy agent docetaxel (Taxotere). Accurins are designed to maximize the drug concentration delivered to the tumor, while minimizing toxicity to healthy tissues.

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Boston.com | Jul 29, 2013

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Phase II Study Shows New Drug is Effective against NSCLC

Phase II Study Shows New Drug is Effective against NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Preliminary results from an ongoing phase II clinical trial of new lung cancer drug AXL1717 suggest that the drug is effective against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with advanced NSCLC received either AXL1717 or chemotherapy with docetaxel (Taxotere) as a second-line treatment. AXL1717, which acts by inhibiting a protein called IGF1R, appeared to be as effective as Taxotere at delaying cancer progression. AXL1717 may be a treatment option for patients who do not respond or become resistant to Taxotere or other second-line treatments. AXL1717 is manufactured by drug company Axelar. More information about the clinical trial can be found here: http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01561456

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News-Medical.Net | Apr 2, 2013

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CHFR Protein Levels Predict Effectiveness of Chemotherapy

CHFR Protein Levels Predict Effectiveness of Chemotherapy | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A study of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) given chemotherapy with carboplatin (Paraplatin) and paclitaxel (Taxol or Abraxane) found that patients with lower levels of the protein CHFR were more likely to respond to the treatment and survived longer than patients with high CHFR levels. These findings suggest that CHFR levels could be a useful biomarker for indicating patients likely to respond to so-called taxane chemotherapy drugs like Taxol, Abraxane, or docetaxel (Taxotere). In the future, treatments that target CHFR may be developed to increase responsiveness to taxane chemotherapy in patients with high CHFR levels.

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Clinical Cancer Research | Feb 5, 2013

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