Lung Cancer Dispatch
Follow
Find tag "crizotinib"
4.1K views | +4 today
Lung Cancer Dispatch
News for Patients and Physicians
Curated by Cancer Commons
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

ASCO: Zykadia Works Before or After Targeted Lung Ca Tx

ASCO: Zykadia Works Before or After Targeted Lung Ca Tx | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Ceritinib (Zykadia) produced good response in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) overexpressing ALK, regardless of prior treatment for that target, an early phase trial showed.


Ceritinib was associated with an overall response rate of 55% in patients previously treated with crizotinib (Xalkori) and 66% in those naive to that ALK inhibitor, Dong-Wan Kim, MD, of the Seoul National University Hospital, and colleagues found.

Editor's note: This article is about a drug called ceritinib (brand name Zykadia), which was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Dug Administration (FDA), allowing doctors in the U.S. to prescribe it to patients who 1) have advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 2) have tumor cells with mutations in the ALK gene, as detected by molecular testing, and 3) have tried treatment with crizotinib (Xalkori) but experienced worsening of their cancer. According to the new research described in this article, ceritinib may actually be beneficial whether or not the patient was previously treated with crizotinib.
Cancer Commons's insight:

MedPage Today  |  Jun 3, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Responses with Crizotinib in MET-Amplified Lung Cancer Show New Targetable Form of Disease

Responses with Crizotinib in MET-Amplified Lung Cancer Show New Targetable Form of Disease | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"In 2011, the drug crizotinib earned accelerated approval by the US FDA to target the subset of advanced non-small cell lung cancers caused by rearrangements of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene, and subsequently was granted regular approval in 2013. The drug also has shown dramatic responses in patients whose lung cancers harbored a different molecular abnormality, namely ROS1 gene rearrangements. Previously unreported phase 1 clinical trial results now show that crizotinib may have a third important molecular target. In advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients with intermediate and high amplifications of the MET gene, crizotinib produced either disease stabilization or tumor response. Sixty-seven percent of patients with high MET amplification showed prolonged response to the drug, which lasted from approximately 6 months to nearly 2.5 years."


Editor's note: Crizotinib (aka Xalkori) is a targeted therapy drug that kills cancer cells by targeting certain molecules found in the cells. It was already known that crizotinib works well for some patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose cancer cells have mutations in the ALK gene and in the ROS1 gene; such mutations, or "molecular biomarkers," are detected by a medical procedure known as "molecular testing," or "genetic testing." Now, scientists say that crizotinib may also be effective for patients with advanced NSCLC whose tumors have abnormally high activity of a protein called MET, which can also be detected via molecular testing.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ScienceDaily  |  May 31, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

New Drug Successfully Treats Crizotinib-Resistant, ALK-Positive Lung Cancer

New Drug Successfully Treats Crizotinib-Resistant, ALK-Positive Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Although the targeted cancer treatment drug crizotinib is very effective in causing rapid regression of a particular form of lung cancer, patients' tumors inevitably become resistant to the drug. Now a new drug called ceritinib appears to be effective against advanced ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), both in tumors that have become resistant to crizotinib and in those never treated with the older drug. The results of a phase 1 clinical trial conducted at centers in 11 countries are reported in the March 27 New England Journal of Medicine."


Editor's note: Crizotinib and ceritinib are meant to treat patients whose tumors have mutations in the ALK gene, as detected by molecular testing.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Mar 26, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

EML4-ALK Fusion Testing, Targeted Crizotinib Treatment Not Cost-Effective in NSCLC

EML4-ALK Fusion Testing, Targeted Crizotinib Treatment Not Cost-Effective in NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"EML4-ALK fusion testing to identify patients with advanced non–small cell lung cancer eligible for first-line, targeted treatment with crizotinib may not be cost-effective, according to study results.

"Researchers in Ontario used a Markov model to compare the cost-effectiveness of two treatment approaches for patients with stage IV nonsquamous NSCLC. One approach consisted of molecular screening and targeted treatment with crizotinib (Xalkori, Pfizer). The other approach consisted of standard care, which included platinum doublet (cisplatin and gemcitabine) as first-line therapy, second-line pemetrexed (Alimta, Eli Lilly) and third-line erlotinib (Tarceva; Genentech, Astellas Pharma)."


Editor's Note: Molecular testing can be used to identify genetic mutations in a patient's tumor that may point to the use of a certain treatment, personalized for him or her. This study explores the costs associated with these treatments. Of course, every patient's treatment decisions will be made for his or her own personal reasons. You can talk to your doctor to find out if molecular testing and targeted therapies are good choices for you.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Healio  |  Mar 17, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Local Radiotherapy May Allow Lung Cancer Patients to Stay on Xalkori Longer

Local Radiotherapy May Allow Lung Cancer Patients to Stay on Xalkori Longer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Crizotinib (Xalkori) is effective for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have a mutation in the ALK gene, but their cancer usually develops resistance to the drug. However, this resistance may affect only part of the cancer, while the majority of the disease still responds to Xalkori. In such cases, localized radiation may be used to destroy the resistant part of the cancer (a technique dubbed 'weeding the garden') while patients continue to take Xalkori. In a small study, patients treated with this method could take Xalkori almost three times longer than those not eligible for the treatment. Longer times on Xalkori were associated with higher rates of 2-year survival. The average time without further relapse after the first radiation treatment was 5.5 months, and patients could be treated multiple times. Similar approaches may be effective with other targeted therapies.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Jan 28, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

FDA Grants Regular Approval to Xalkori for Treatment of ALK-Mutant Lung Cancer

FDA Grants Regular Approval to Xalkori for Treatment of ALK-Mutant Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted regular approval to the drug crizotinib (Xalkori) for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who have mutations in the ALK gene. Xalkori received accelerated approval for this application in August 2011. Regular approval was awarded based on the results of a study examining patients with advanced NSCLC whose cancer had progressed despite first-line chemotherapy. Patients treated with Xalkori went an average of 7.7 months without further cancer worsening, compared to 3.0 months in those receiving the chemotherapy agents pemetrexed (Alimta) or docetaxel (Taxotere). Tumors shrank in 65% of the Xalkori-treated patients, compared to 20% with Alimta or Taxotere. However, overall survival did not differ between the Xalkori group and the chemotherapy group.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ASCO Post  |  Nov 21, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Roche Gets Breakthrough Status for Lung Cancer Drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted breakthrough therapy designation for a lung cancer treatment  called alectinib, made by Roche. The designation was based on new data presented at the European Cancer Congress (ECC).  Alectinib is reported to be effective in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with mutations in the ALK gene. Imporantly, tumor shrinkage was seen in patients whose cancer worsened on crizotinib (Xalkori), the currently approved drug for this subgroup of patents.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Drug Discovery and Development | Sep 23, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

New ALK Inhibitor Shrinks Lung Cancer in Early Trial

New ALK Inhibitor Shrinks Lung Cancer in Early Trial | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

On the strength of promising results from an ongoing clinical trial, reseachers are starting a new trial for people with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that has abnormal ALK genes. This update was presented at the 2013 European Cancer Congress in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The phase I/II trial included 34 people with NSCLC with ALK abnormalities who were treated with an ALK inhibitor called AP26113. Tumors shrank in nearly all of the patients, including tumors that had spread to the brain, as well as those that resisted another ALK inhibitor called crizotinib (Xalkori). The new trial will test how well AP26113 shrinks NSCLCs that both have ALK abnormalities and are resistant to crizotinib.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ARIAD Pharmaceuticals, Inc. │Sep 28, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

More Lung Cancer Patients May Benefit from Xalkori Than Previously Thought

More Lung Cancer Patients May Benefit from Xalkori Than Previously Thought | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Xalkori (crizotinib) is very effective for most non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with mutations in the ALK gene. However, new evidence suggests that current criteria for ALK mutation may be missing patients who could be treated with Xalkori. A recent study of NSCLC patients found that 8.5% had tumors that contained more than 10% cells with ALK mutations, but less than 15%, the current cut-off for 'ALK-positive' lung cancer. These patients may benefit from Xalkori or other ALK inhibitors. Moreover, some patients have atypical ALK mutations that are not detected by the standard test. A patient with such atypical ALK mutations profiled in a recent case study responded well to Xalkori treatment.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress | Sep 10, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Case of Resistance to Xalkori Linked to New Mutation in ROS1 Gene

Case of Resistance to Xalkori Linked to New Mutation in ROS1 Gene | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Crizotinib (Xalkori) is an effective treatment for lung cancer patients with mutations in the ALK or the ROS1 gene. However, patients usually develop resistance to the drug after some time. A patient with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with a ROS1 mutation improved significantly at first after enrolling in a clinical trial assessing Xalkori. However, after 3 months, her cancer again began to worsen despite continued Xalkori treatment. Genetic testing revealed that she had developed a new, additional mutation in the ROS1 gene that makes cells more resistant to Xalkori. The new mutation was present in all of the tumors that had stopped responding to the drug. A better understanding of the way in which cancer cells develop resistance to targeted therapies is critical for developing new treatments that can overcome drug resistance.

Cancer Commons's insight:

New England Journal of Medicine | June 1, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Early Trial of New Lung Cancer Drug CH5424802 Yields Encouraging Results

Many patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have mutations in the ALK gene benefit from treatment with ALK inhibitors. A phase I/II clinical trial of the new ALK inhibitor CH5424802 determined that the drug was well tolerated and showed signs of effectiveness. Out of 46 patients with ALK-mutant advanced NSCLC, 2 experienced a complete response and 41 a partial response; 40 patients currently remain on the treatment. If future studies confirm the effectiveness of CH5424802, it could offer an additional option to crizotinib (Xalkori), currently the only ALK inhibitor approved for treating ALK-mutant NSCLC. An ongoing clinical trial is investigating whether CH5424802 is beneficial in patients who have become resistant to Xalkori.

Cancer Commons's insight:

The Lancet | April 30, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Testing for EGFR and ALK Mutations Recommended for All Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients

Testing for EGFR and ALK Mutations Recommended for All Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

All patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the lung, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), should be tested for mutations in the EGFR and ALK genes, according to guidelines developed by three prominent professional medical societies. Mutations in these genes predict a much higher likelihood of benefitting from treatment with EGFR inhibitors like erlotinib (Tarceva) and gefitinib (Iressa), or ALK inhibitors like crizotinib (Xalkori), respectively. The tests should be performed for all adenocarcinoma patients as soon as advanced disease is detected, regardless of sex, race, smoking history, or other clinical risk factors.

Cancer Commons's insight:

MedPage Today | Apr 5, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

ALK Gene Mutations May Present New Treatment Target for Some Lung Cancer Patients with Brain Tumors

Treatment options are limited for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that has spread to the brain (brain metastases). Standard chemotherapy drugs often cannot penetrate the brain well enough to treat brain tumors, leaving radiation, surgery, or easing of symptoms as the only choices. However, drugs that target specific mutations in tumors may open up new possibilities. Some NSCLC patients who have mutations in the ALK gene are likely to benefit from treatment with ALK inhibitors like crizotinib (Xalkori). A study of NSCLC patients with ALK mutations in their lung tumors showed that ALK mutations were present in their brain tumors, too. This finding suggests that ALK inhibitors may be effective in treating brain metastases in patients with ALK-mutant NSCLC, as long as the drugs can effectively penetrate the brain. Research paper: http://www.lungcancerjournal.info/article/S0169-5002(13)00055-X/abstract

Cancer Commons's insight:

HealthCanal | Mar 23, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

ARIAD Presents Updated Phase 1/2 Data on AP26113 in Patients with ALK+ Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

ARIAD Presents Updated Phase 1/2 Data on AP26113 in Patients with ALK+ Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"ARIAD Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced updated clinical results on its investigational tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), AP26113, in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) from an ongoing Phase 1/2 trial. These study results show anti-tumor activity of AP26113 in patients with crizotinib-resistant anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive NSCLC, including patients with brain metastases. Crizotinib is approved for ALK-positive NSCLC patients."


Editor's note: This story is about a targeted drug called AP26113, which may benefit some patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Specifically, it has shown promise for those patients whose tumors have mutations in the ALK gene, as detected by molecular testing, and who have already been treated with the drug crizotinib (Xalkori) but have grown resistant to it.

Cancer Commons's insight:

MarketWatch  |  May 31, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

FDA Approves Ceritinib (Zykadia) for Metastatic Lung Cancer

FDA Approves Ceritinib (Zykadia) for Metastatic Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Earlier today the US Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval to ceritinib (Zykadia) for the treatment of patients with metastatic ALK-positive non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). About 2% to 7% percent of NSCLC patients have ALK-positive disease.


"The new drug, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was approved 4 months early under the FDA's accelerated approval program and is intended for the treatment of patients who previously received the ALK-inhibitor crizotinib."


Editor's note: FDA approval means that doctors can now begin prescribing ceritinib treat patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors have mutations in the ALK gene, as detected by molecular testing. We previously posted about ceritinib here.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Cancer Network  |  Apr 29, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Phase III Study: Crizotinib Prolongs Progression-Free Survival in Previously Untreated ALK-Positive Advanced NSCLC

Phase III Study: Crizotinib Prolongs Progression-Free Survival in Previously Untreated ALK-Positive Advanced NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"In the phase III PROFILE 1014 study, the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor crizotinib (Xalkori) was found to significantly prolong progression-free survival in previously untreated patients with ALK-positive advanced nonsquamous non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) compared with standard platinum-based chemotherapy.


"No unexpected safety issues were identified in the current study, and adverse events were consistent with the known safety profile for crizotinib. Efficacy and safety data from this study will be submitted for presentation at a future medical meeting."


Editor's note: Xalkori is a targeted therapy that is meant to treat patients whose tumors have mutations in the ALK gene, as detected by molecular testing.

Cancer Commons's insight:

The ASCO Post  |  Mar 26, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Crizotinib Beyond Progressive Disease Improved Survival in ALK-Positive NSCLC

Crizotinib Beyond Progressive Disease Improved Survival in ALK-Positive NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Patients with ALK-positive, advanced non–small cell lung cancer who received crizotinib beyond progressive disease demonstrated longer OS than patients who did not continue treatment, according to results of a retrospective study.


"The analysis included 194 patients treated with crizotinib (Xalkori, Pfizer) who experienced progressive disease defined by RECIST criteria. Of them, 120 (62%) demonstrated ongoing clinical benefit and continued treatment with crizotinib for more than 3 weeks."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Healio  |  Feb 27, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Xalkori More Effective than Chemotherapy As Second-Line Treatment in ALK+ Lung Cancer

Xalkori More Effective than Chemotherapy As Second-Line Treatment in ALK+ Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The ALK inhibitor crizotinib (Xalkori) has shown effectiveness in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have changes in the ALK gene that make the gene overactive (so-called 'ALK-positive' patients). A recent clinical trial compared Xalkori to chemotherapy as a second-line treatment in these patients. Over 300 patients with ALK-positive advanced NSCLC who had undergone one previous round of chemotherapy were treated either with Xalkori or one of the chemotherapy drugs pemetrexed (Alimta) or docetaxel (Taxotere). Tumors shrank in 65% of Xalkori-treated patients, compared to 20% of those receiving chemotherapy. The Xalkori-treated patients also went longer without their cancer worsening, experienced fewer symptoms, and reported higher quality of life.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Jan 13, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Crizotinib Can Reduce Kidney Function and Testosterone Levels

Crizotinib Can Reduce Kidney Function and Testosterone Levels | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A recent study suggests that crizotinib (Xalkori) can reduce kidney function. Lung cancer patients treated with Xalkori saw their kidney function decrease by 23.9% on average. Kidney function recovered when Xalkori was discontinued. However, as patients usually have to take Xalkori for months or years, these findings still warrant caution, especially in patients taking other medications that affect kidney function or with preexisting kidney damage. In an earlier study, investigators had found that Xalkori decreased testosterone levels in 84% of male patients. Because cancer drugs like Xalkori increasingly receive accelerated approval, not all of their side effects are known by the time they are approved. Doctors therefore need to carefully monitor their patients for possible adverse effects.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Nov 21, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

ALK Inhibitor on Track for Phase II Lung Cancer Trial

Early results of a phase I clinical trial suggest that an experimental ALK inhibitor drug will progress to the next phase of testing, researchers reported at the 2013 European Cancer Congress in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Called TSR-011, the new ALK inhibitor shrank tumors or kept them from growing in three people with non-small cell lung cancers that had abnormal ALK genes and that resisted a current ALK inhibitor called crizotinib. The researchers expect that TSR-011 will advance to a phase II trial of NSCLC patients with ALK abnormalities by end of year.

Cancer Commons's insight:

TESARO, Inc.│Sep 29, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

UK Health Authority Issues Final Rejection for Cancer Drug Xalkori

UK Health Authority Issues Final Rejection for Cancer Drug Xalkori | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The UK’s National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) confirmed its decision to reject using National Health Service funding to provide crizotinib (Xalkori) to patients. Xalkori is used for patients with previously treated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have mutations in the ALK gene. While NICE acknowledges that Xalkori is effective in these patients, they do not consider its benefit substantial enough to warrant its high cost. Xalkori has been found to extend the time without cancer progression by an average of 5.1 months compared to standard chemotherapy; it is unclear whether it increases overall survival. UK patients can still take Xalkori, but would have to pay the full cost themselves (£37,512 - £51,579 for a complete treatment course).

Cancer Commons's insight:

PharmaTimes | Sep 25, 2013

more...
Raja Mudad's curator insight, September 27, 2013 9:31 AM

We are very lucky in this country (so far!!) to be able to use cutting edge, science-based treatments for cancers.  Xalkori (crizotinib) for ALK + patients with lung cancer will not be covered in the UK.

Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

New Lung Cancer Drug LDK378 Appears Effective

In an ongoing phase I clinical trial, the new lung cancer drug LDK378 showed signs of effectiveness in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with mutations in the ALK gene. Sixty percent of the patients treated with the highest dose of LDK378, which blocks ALK, benefited from the drug. These effects were seen both in patients who had never been treated with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib (Xalkori) before and patients who had become resistant to Xalkori. LDK378 was declared a Breakthrough Therapy by the FDA in March, a designation intended to expedite the development and approval process of treatments for life-threatening conditions. Novartis, which produces LDK378, is initiating two phase II clinical trials (one examining patients who were previously treated with chemotherapy and Xalkori, the other patients with no history of Xalkori treatment) and planning a forthcoming phase III trial.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Yahoo! Finance | June 3, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Xalkori More Successful than Chemotherapy in Lung Cancer Patients with ALK Mutations

Xalkori More Successful than Chemotherapy in Lung Cancer Patients with ALK Mutations | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Crizotinib (Xalkori) may be more beneficial than chemotherapy for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have a mutation in the ALK gene, a phase III clinical trial found. The patients had previously been treated with chemotherapy, after which their cancer had started to progress again. During the trial, they received either a different chemotherapy agent or Xalkori. Xalkori-treated patients went on average 7.7 months without a worsening of their cancer, compared to 3.0 months in the chemotherapy-treated patients. Patients on Xalkori also experienced better quality of life. This study demonstrates the importance of genetic testing for biomarkers, such as ALK mutation, and prescription of targeted therapies based on these biomarkers.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ScienceDaily | June 1, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Lung Cancer Patient with ROS1 Mutation Responds to Xalkori

Lung Cancer Patient with ROS1 Mutation Responds to Xalkori | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A patient with advanced lung adenocarcinoma, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), had relapsed from, or failed to respond to, numerous chemotherapy agents and targeted therapies and was deteriorating rapidly. Previous molecular testing had found no mutations in commonly tested biomarker genes, but a follow-up test detected a mutation in the ROS1 gene. The patient then started treatment with crizotinib (Xalkori) and experienced a dramatic improvement, including tumor shrinkage. Xalkori treatment has continued for 12 weeks so far, with no sign of cancer progression. This case demonstrates the remarkable effectiveness that Xalkori can have in ROS1-mutant NSCLC, as well as the need for prompt and comprehensive molecular testing for all NSCLC patients.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Lung Cancer | Apr 4, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

UK Health Authority Provisionally Rejects Funding for Cancer Drug Xalkori

UK Health Authority Provisionally Rejects Funding for Cancer Drug Xalkori | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The UK’s National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has provisionally recommended against the use of National Health Service resources to provide crizotinib (Xalkori) to patients. NICE considers the drug to be too expensive for the expected benefit. Xalkori is used to treat patients with previously treated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have mutations in the ALK gene. The drug has been approved in the U.S. since August, 2011, and conditionally approved in Europe since October, 2012. Patients in the UK can still get access to Xalkori, but would have to cover the cost (£4,689/$7,100 for a 30-day supply) themselves. NICE’s provisional guidance is up for comment, after which a second draft guidance will be issued. More details at: http://www.pharmatimes.com/Article/13-03-27/NICE_issues_draft_no_for_Pfizer_s_Xalkori_but_opens_consultation.aspx

Cancer Commons's insight:

PMLiVE  | Mar 27, 2013

more...
No comment yet.