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Chemo Combo Increases Survival, Toxicity in Sensitive Relapsed SCLC

Chemo Combo Increases Survival, Toxicity in Sensitive Relapsed SCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Cisplatin, etoposide, and irinotecan outperformed topotecan as second-line chemotherapy in patients with sensitive relapsed small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) in a Japanese trial, though there was substantially increased toxicity with the regimen.


“ 'Topotecan is the only drug approved in the United States and the European Union for relapsed SCLC,' said Koichi Goto, MD, PhD, of the National Cancer Center Hospital East in Chiba, Japan. He presented results of the new trial at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago. Sensitive relapse refers to cancers that respond to initial chemotherapy and relapse more than 3 months after completion of that therapy, while refractory cancers do not respond initially or relapse within that 3 month window."


Editor's note: This story is about a clinical trial with volunteer patients to test a new treatment for small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The new treatment is specifically for people with SCLC who were treated with chemotherapy successfully, but whose cancer returned more than 3 months after chemo—this is known as "sensitive relapsed SCLC." The new treatment combines three chemo drugs: cisplatin, etoposide, and irinotecan. In the clinical trial, some patients took the chemo combo and some were treated with the chemo drug topotecan, which is a standard treatment for the condition. Patients who took the new treatment lived longer, but they had more toxic side effects than the patients who took topotecan.

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Cancer Network  |  Jun 23, 2014

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Phase III Trial of Adding Figitumumab to Chemotherapy in Advanced Nonadenocarcinoma NSCLC Stopped Early for Futility and Increased Harm

Phase III Trial of Adding Figitumumab to Chemotherapy in Advanced Nonadenocarcinoma NSCLC Stopped Early for Futility and Increased Harm | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"In the first phase III trial assessing the combination of an insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) inhibitor with chemotherapy as first-line treatment for advanced nonadenocarcinoma non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the addition of the fully human immunoglobulin G2 monoclonal antibody figitumumab to paclitaxel/carboplatin did not improve overall survival over chemotherapy alone. The study, reported by Langer et al in Journal of Clinical Oncology, was stopped early due to futility and an increased frequency of serious adverse events, including treatment-related death, in patients receiving figitumumab."


Editor's note: In a clinical trial with volunteer patients, a new drug called figitumumab did not show any benefits over standard chemotherapy. The clinical trial was stopped earlier than scheduled because of serious side effects of fogitumumab, including, for some patients, death.

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The ASCO Post  |  Jun 12, 2014

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Prolonged Fasting 'Re-Boots' Immune System

Prolonged Fasting 'Re-Boots' Immune System | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Results of a new study on mice and a phase 1 trial of humans suggest that prolonged cycles of fasting - for 2-4 days at a time - not only protect against toxic effects of chemotherapy, but also trigger stem cell regeneration of new immune cells and clearing out of old, damaged cells.


"The study, by researchers from the University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles, and published in the journalCell Stem Cell, is the first to show that a natural intervention can trigger regeneration of an organ or system through stem cells.


"The team believes the findings could benefit people with immune system damage, for example if they have received chemotherapy treatment for cancer. It could also benefit the elderly whose immune systems are weakened through aging, making them more susceptible to disease."

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Medical News Today  |  Jun 6, 2014

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Tambre Leighn's curator insight, June 7, 1:13 PM

Intuitively this week, my body felt like it needed to fast.  Intuitively, even thought I'd only planned a two day juice fast, it turned into four.  With the right plan for fasting, and doctor's supervision as needed depending on your state of health or knowledge about how to fast correctly, it is highly doable.  

 

I use a company that specializes in juicing and provides a whole kit of raw juices designed to give me different nutrients at different times of the day and it's all organic.  I was never hungry and only had one afternoon dealing with a detox headache from going off caffeine. The rest of the time I was completely energized.  Returning to food now, my body is craving raw vegetables and has no desire for caffeine or some of the other nutritional "slips" into foods that aren't healthy for me.

 

Amazing to see more natural paths to healing being embraced by the medical community.  Medical interventions are sometimes very necessary and so I am grateful that we have them.  It's not an either/or...it's an and - how can more "traditional" medical approaches and some natural approaches work together for best outcomes...that's an exciting place to be.

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Thoracic RT Yields Improved Survival in Extensive-Stage SCLC

Thoracic RT Yields Improved Survival in Extensive-Stage SCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Thoracic radiotherapy along with prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) significantly prolonged progression-free and overall survival in patients with extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer, according to results of a new study presented at ASCO.


"Ben Slotman, MD, PhD, of VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, presented the study and said that previous work had shown that PCI could improve both symptomatic brain metastases and overall survival at 1 year. 'In that study, we also noticed that the vast majority of patients after chemotherapy had intrathoracic disease' and intrathoracic progression, he said, which was the impetus for the new study using thoracic radiotherapy."


Editor's note: To learn more about new prospects for treating small cell lung cancer (SCLC), see our two-part blog feature on the topic.

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Cancer Network  |  Jun 5, 2014

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MEDIA ALERT New Data Show Giotrif® (Afatinib) Provided More than One Year Additional Survival for Lung Cancer Patients with the Most Common Type of EGFR Mutation (del19) Compared to Chemotherapy

"Boehringer Ingelheim today announced results of the pre-specified individual, as well as the exploratory combined, analyses of two Phase III trials (LUX-Lung 3 and LUX-Lung 6). These data, to be presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), demonstrated for the first time that patients with NSCLC with the most common epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation (exon 19 deletions; del19) lived more than one year longer if treated with first-line afatinib compared to chemotherapy."


Editor's note: This article discusses the results of a clinical trial that tested a targeted drug called afatinib (aka Giotrif, or Gilotrif)  on volunteer patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The trial found that patients whose tumors had a particular mutation called del19 in the EGFR gene lived more than one year longer if treated with afatinib than if treated with chemotherapy. EGFR mutations and other mutations are detected via molecular testing, and can be used by oncologists to help develop personalized lung cancer treatment plans.

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Boehringer Ingelheim  |  Jun 2, 2014

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Tesaro Summarizes Phase 3 Rolapitant Data Presented at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting and Provides an Update on Niraparib Development Strategy

Tesaro Summarizes Phase 3 Rolapitant Data Presented at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting and Provides an Update on Niraparib Development Strategy | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"TESARO, Inc. (Nasdaq: TSRO), an oncology-focused biopharmaceutical company, today announced that final results from three Phase 3 trials of rolapitant, an investigational neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor antagonist in development for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), were presented today at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Chicago."


Editor's note: This story is about a drug called rolapitant that shows promise in preventing nausea and vomiting for patients receiving chemotherapy treatment.

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Benzinga  |  Jun 1, 2014

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No Progression-Free or Overall Survival Benefit With Second- or Third-Line Erlotinib vs Docetaxel in EGFR-Unselected Japanese NSCLC Patients

No Progression-Free or Overall Survival Benefit With Second- or Third-Line Erlotinib vs Docetaxel in EGFR-Unselected Japanese NSCLC Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"In a Japanese phase III trial (DELTA) reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Kawaguchi et al found that erlotinib (Tarceva) was associated with no progression-free survival or overall survival advantage as second- or third-line therapy in EGFR-unselected patients with non–small cell lung cancer.


"In this open-label trial, 301 patients with stage IIIB or IV NSCLC, previous treatment with one or two chemotherapy regimens, evaluable or measurable disease, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0 to 2 were randomly assigned between August 2009 and July 2012 to erlotinib at 150 mg daily (n = 150) or docetaxel at 60 mg/m2every 3 weeks (n = 151). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. In total, 109 patients (73%) in the erlotinib group and 90 (60%) in the docetaxel group had EGFR wild-type disease. Study treatment was third line in 19% and 14%, respectively."


Editor's note: This clinical trial tested a drug called erlotinib (brand name Tarceva), which is already known to be an effective treatment for lung cancer patients whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene. However, in this trial, the scientists were interested in whether erlotinib might help all patients, regardless of whether EGFR is mutated. The results show that erlotinib is no more effective than chemo for patients without EGFR mutations. But we recently posted another story about a protein test that may predict whether a patient without EGFR mutations might benefit from erlotinib treatment: http://www.cancercommons.org/news/proteomic-signature-for-egfr-inhibitor-therapy-predicts-survival-benefit-of-second-line-chemotherapy-vs-erlotinib-in-nsclc/.

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The ASCO Post  |  May 27, 2014

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Proteomic Signature for EGFR Inhibitor Therapy Predicts Survival Benefit of Second-Line Chemotherapy vs Erlotinib in NSCLC

Proteomic Signature for EGFR Inhibitor Therapy Predicts Survival Benefit of Second-Line Chemotherapy vs Erlotinib in NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"There are conflicting data on whether epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy is beneficial in second-line treatment of lung cancer patients with unknown or wild-type EGFR status. In a phase III trial (PROSE) reported in The Lancet Oncology, Gregorc et al assessed the predictive value of a proteomic signature serum protein test for likely outcome of EGFR inhibitor therapy in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving second-line therapy with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib (Tarceva) vs chemotherapy. They found that the test was predictive of differential survival benefit for erlotinib vs chemotherapy, with patients classified by the test as likely to have poor outcome on EGFR inhibitor therapy having better outcome on chemotherapy."

"Overall survival was significantly better with chemotherapy among patients with a proteomic classification of poor, whereas there was no difference between chemotherapy and erlotinib in patients with a classification of good."

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The ASCO Post  |  May 22, 2014

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Synta Announces Results from Final Analysis of the GALAXY-1 Trial of Ganetespib in NSCLC

Synta Announces Results from Final Analysis of the GALAXY-1 Trial of Ganetespib in NSCLC | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Synta Pharmaceuticals Corp. (NASDAQ: SNTA) today announced final results from the GALAXY-1 trial, a global, randomized, multi-center study designed to identify the patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with adenocarcinoma histology most likely to benefit from second-line treatment with the Company’s lead drug candidate, the Hsp90 inhibitor ganetespib, in combination with docetaxel versus docetaxel alone. Ganetespib is a next-generation inhibitor of the chaperone protein Hsp90, which is critical for the activation and stability of numerous proteins that drive cancer growth and proliferation. Ganetespib has been studied in over 1000 patients to date."


Editor's note: This story is about clinical trials designed to test the drug ganetespib in people with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The drug manufacturer (Synta) recently reported updated results for one of the trials, GALAXY-1. The results confirm that the researchers were able to identify patients who were most likely to benefit from a treatment that combines ganetespib with the chemotherapy drug docetaxel.

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Synta  |  May 8, 2014

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AbbVie Announces Initiation of Pivotal Phase III Study of Veliparib (ABT-888) for Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

"AbbVie (ABBV) announced the initiation of a global Phase III clinical trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of its investigational compound, veliparib (ABT-888), in patients with previously untreated locally advanced or metastatic squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The trial will compare patients randomized to receive either the standard chemotherapies of carboplatin and paclitaxel with the addition of veliparib, versus patients receiving carboplatin and paclitaxel with the addition of placebo."


Editor's note: Clinical trials are used to test new cancer treatments. Enrolling in a clinical trial might give a patient access to a promising treatment he/she would otherwise not be able to receive. Learn more about lung cancer clinical trials here.

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Roche Lung Cancer Pill Gets Reprieve in UK Reversal

"Britain's health cost watchdog NICE on Friday reversed an earlier decision to limit the use of Roche's Tarceva cancer pill on the state health service in a move the drugmaker said would help around 2,000 patients a year.


"New draft guidance from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) now backs use of Tarceva for people with non-small-cell lung cancer that has progressed after chemotherapy in wider circumstances than originally suggested."

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Reuters  |  Apr 3, 2014

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Gene May Predict if Further Cancer Treatments are Needed

Gene May Predict if Further Cancer Treatments are Needed | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A new predictive tool that could help patients with breast cancer and certain lung cancers decide whether follow-up treatments are likely to help is being developed by researchers. The findings offer insight into helping patients assess treatment risk. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy that can destroy tumors also can damage surrounding healthy tissue. So with an appropriate test, patients could avoid getting additional radiation or chemotherapy treatment they may not need."


Editor's note: This study was performed in mice, so it will be several years before patients can benefit from it. However, doctors are already using molecular testing to guide treatment decisions, often for patients with advanced lung cancer. For early-stage patients, the Pervenio test can help determine whether lung cancer is likely to return after surgery, which can let doctors know to consider preventive ("adjuvant") treatments.

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ScienceDaily  |  Mar 28, 2014

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Potential Lung Cancer Vaccine Shows Renewed Promise

Potential Lung Cancer Vaccine Shows Renewed Promise | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Researchers at UC Davis have found that the investigational cancer vaccine tecemotide, when administered with the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, boosted immune response and reduced the number of tumors in mice with lung cancer. The study also found that radiation treatments did not significantly impair the immune response. The paper was published on March 10 in the journal Cancer Immunology Research, an American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) publication.


"Though tecemotide, also known as Stimuvax, has shown great potential at times, the recent Phase III trial found no overall survival benefit for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, further analysis showed one group of patients, who received concurrent chemotherapy and radiation followed by tecemotide, did benefit from the vaccine. As a result, tecemotide's manufacturer, Merck KGaA, is sponsoring additional post-clinical animal and human studies, so far with good results."


Editor's note: Cancer vaccines are meant to stimulate the immune system to fight cancer. Stimuvax is a cancer vaccine that was found to have no overall survival benefit for patients in a recent clinical trial. But closer analysis of the trial data and the mouse study mentioned above have raised hopes that the vaccine might work with some combination of chemo and radiation treatment.

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 20, 2014

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FDA Warns Docetaxel May Cause Alcohol Intoxication Symptoms After Treatment

FDA Warns Docetaxel May Cause Alcohol Intoxication Symptoms After Treatment | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The FDA has issued an alert to health care professionals that docetaxel contains ethanol, which may cause patients to experience intoxication during and after treatment.


"The FDA is currently revising the labels of all docetaxel drug products to warn about this potential risk. Health care professionals should consider the alcohol content of docetaxel when prescribing or administering the drug to patients, especially in those whom alcohol intake should be avoided or reduced and when using it concomitantly with other medications."

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Healio  |  Jun 20, 2014

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Survey Sheds Light on Common Clinical Practice for Incompletely Resected Lung Cancer

"A landmark survey of more than 700 specialists provides crucial real-world insight into the treatments most oncologists choose for lung cancer patients whose tumour has been incompletely resected, an expert from the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) says.

"Jean Yves Douillard, from the ICO Institut de Cancerologie de l'Ouest René Gauducheau, France, Chair of the ESMO Educational Committee, was commenting on a paper published in the journal Lung Cancer. In the study, researchers led by Raffaele Califano of The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK, surveyed 768 oncologists from 41 European countries about the treatments they offered patients who had 'R1 resected' non-small-cell lung cancer."

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 10, 2014

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ASCO: Antibody Adds 6 Weeks to Squamous NSCLC Survival

ASCO: Antibody Adds 6 Weeks to Squamous NSCLC Survival | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The novel anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody necitumumab modestly improved survival in squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a pivotal trial, but many called the effect too small to count.


"Adding the drug to a standard chemotherapy regimen improved overall survival by 16% (P=0.012), Nick Thatcher, MD, of Christie Hospital in Manchester, England, and colleagues found in the SQUIRE trial.


"While only about a 6-week gain over chemotherapy alone (median 11.5 versus 9.9 months), Thatcher called the findings an important advance."


Editor's note: Necitumumab is a drug that may hold promise for some patients with squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a clinical trial to test the drug on volunteer patients, researchers found that necitumumab can increase survival by 6 weeks, compared to standard chemotherapy treatment. Some researchers say a 6 week increase in survival time is not terribly meaningful, and may be setting the bar too low for treatment of squamous NSCLC.

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MedPage Today  |  Jun 5, 2014

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Aduro Announces ASCO Presentation of Promising Results from Phase 1b Clinical trial of its Novel Immunotherapy for the Treatment of Mesothelioma

Aduro Announces ASCO Presentation of Promising Results from Phase 1b Clinical trial of its Novel Immunotherapy for the Treatment of Mesothelioma | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Aduro BioTech, Inc., a clinical stage biotechnology company, today announced the presentation of safety and efficacy data from a Phase 1b clinical trial of its novel immunotherapy CRS-207 in combination with standard chemotherapy in patients with unresectable malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Of the 16 evaluable patients, 69% (11/16) had confirmed durable partial responses (PR) with 25% (4/16) experiencing stable disease (SD) after CRS-207 and chemotherapy. The results were presented by Raffit Hassan, M.D., co-chief of the Thoracic and GI Oncology Branch at the National Cancer Institute, in a poster presentation at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology Meeting (ASCO) held in Chicago."


Editor's note: Scientists have developed a new drug called CRS-207 for treating mesothelioma. CRS-207 is an immunotherapy, meaning that it boosts a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. A clinical trial testing CRS-207 in volunteer patients found promising results for the drug.

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CRS-207, based on Aduro’s live-attenuated, double-deleted (LADD) Listeria monocytogenesimmunotherapy platform, has been engineered to induce a potent innate immune response as well as an adaptive immune response targeting mesothelin, an antigen over-expressed in MPM tumors.


CRS-207 plus GVAX in a Phase II advanced pancreatic cancer trial (ECLIPSE) in 93 evaluable patients extended overall survival to 6.1 months from the GVAX arm alone.

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ASCO: Chemotherapy Key Part of Curative Lung Cancer Therapies

ASCO: Chemotherapy Key Part of Curative Lung Cancer Therapies | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Cancer Network: Thank you for speaking with us today, Dr. Kris. First, can you tell us why this is an important topic for an education session? Is there a debate of the use of chemotherapy in treating lung cancer?


"Dr. Kris: I wouldn’t quite say that there is a debate, but there is an impression that the therapy of lung cancers has switched to targeted therapies or immune therapies. Looking at the ASCO abstracts this year that would be an easy conclusion to draw. But there is an indisputable fact that no matter what target you can identify in a patient’s tumor, be it PD-L1 or a BRAF mutation, at some point in a patient’s illness they will be receiving chemotherapy. As we look at entire care of people with lung cancer it is very important to remember that virtually every single one will receive chemotherapy, and that we need to pay attention to choosing the best chemotherapy. We also need to think about doing research in chemotherapy. Clearly, we can do a better job, and we need more research to find the best drugs. Also, we need to find a way to use them with our targeted therapies."


Editor's note: Targeted therapies and immunotherapies are all the rage now in cancer treatment. But there are still important roles for chemotherapy. This article gives a great overview of recent advancements in the use of chemotherapy in lung cancer treatment, and why we need further research to refine and improve the benefits of chemotherapy.

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Cancer Network  |  May 29, 2014

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Spectrum Pharmaceuticals Completes Enrollment in Phase 2 Trial of SPI-2012 - A Novel Long-Acting Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (GCSF) to Treat Chemotherapy-induced Neutropenia

"Spectrum Pharmaceuticals (SPPI), a biotechnology company with fully integrated commercial and drug development operations and with a primary focus in Hematology and Oncology, today announced that the key phase 2 trial of its long-acting granulocyte stimulating factor analog developed using LAPSCOVERY technology (SPI-2012) has completed its Phase 2 study enrollment; this positions Spectrum for Phase 3 decision making before year end."


Editor's note: Neutropenia is a potentially life-threatening side effect of chemotherapy. This clinical trial is testing whether a treatment called LAPSCOVERY is effective against neutropenia.

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Yahoo!  |  May 29, 2014

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Worse Side Effects from Chemotherapy Experienced When Biological Rhythms Interrupted

"Patients receiving chemical treatment for cancer often suffer fatigue and body weight loss, two of the most worrying effects of this therapy linked to the alteration of their circadian rhythms.


"The circadian system, better known as our biological clock, is responsible for coordinating all the processes that take place in our organism.


"If it does not function correctly, what is known as a circadian disruption or chronodisruption, has for years been linked to an increased incidence of cancer, obesity, diabetes, depression, cognitive problems or cardiovascular diseases."


Editor's note: This research opens up the possibility of personalizing the timing of chemotherapy treatments to minimize side effects.

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Medical News Today  |  May 23, 2014

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Chemotherapy Timing is Key to Success — Nanoparticles that Stagger Delivery of 2 Drugs Knock out Aggressive Tumors in Mice

Chemotherapy Timing is Key to Success — Nanoparticles that Stagger Delivery of 2 Drugs Knock out Aggressive Tumors in Mice | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"MIT researchers have devised a novel cancer treatment that destroys tumor cells by first disarming their defenses, then hitting them with a lethal dose of DNA damage.


"In studies with mice, the research team showed that this one-two punch, which relies on a nanoparticle that carries two drugs and releases them at different times, dramatically shrinks lung and breast tumors. The MIT team, led by Michael Yaffe, the David H. Koch Professor in Science, and Paula Hammond, the David H. Koch Professor in Engineering, describe the findings in the online edition of Science Signaling."


Editor's note: This story is about a new treatment that has been studied in mice. While it is possible that the treatment could eventually make it to clinical trials with humans, the treatment currently cannot be used to treat cancer.

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Bionity.com  |  May 12, 2014

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Chemotherapy May be Preferable Option in NSCLC with Wild Type EGFR

Chemotherapy May be Preferable Option in NSCLC with Wild Type EGFR | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Chemotherapy yielded improved PFS vs. treatment using epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with advanced non–small cell lung cancer with wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor.


"However, researchers noted that chemotherapy did not confer a benefit over EGFR TKIs in terms of OS.


"In the meta-analysis, researchers conducted a literature search of several scientific databases, including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane database, and abstracts from meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the European Society of Medical Oncology."


Editor's note: The study described here compared chemotherapy to treatment with targeted therapy drugs called EGFR TKIs for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors did NOT have mutations in the EGFR gene. (EGFR mutations and other mutations are often tested to help determine patients' treatment options.) The scientists found that chemotherapy  may be a better option for these patients. Chemotherapy seemed to extend the time that patients lived without their disease worsening. However, it did not show any benefit over EGFR TKIs in terms of overall survival.

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Healio  |  May 3, 2014

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Chemotherapy May be Better for Certain Patients with Advanced Lung Cancer

Chemotherapy May be Better for Certain Patients with Advanced Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Among patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer without a mutation of a certain gene, conventional chemotherapy, compared with treatment using epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, was associated with improvement in survival without progression of the cancer, but not with overall survival, according to a study."


Editor's note: The drugs discussed in this story, "epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors," are targeted therapies that are used to treat lung cancer patients whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene, as detected by molecular testing. Scientists wanted to find out whether the drugs could also help patients without EGFR mutations. However, it was found that the drugs were no more effective than chemotherapy in improving patients' overall survival. This supports the idea that EGFR inhibitor drugs should only be given to patients whose tumors have EGFR mutations.

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ScienceDaily  |  Apr 8, 2014

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Phase II Trial Shows Feasibility of Customized Adjuvant Treatment in NSCLC, but Phase III Trial Canceled Due to Unreliability of ERCC1 Readouts

Phase II Trial Shows Feasibility of Customized Adjuvant Treatment in NSCLC, but Phase III Trial Canceled Due to Unreliability of ERCC1 Readouts | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"In the phase II Tailored Postsurgical Therapy in Early-Stage NSCLC (TASTE) trial (IFCT-0801), reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Wislez et al examined the feasibility of customized adjuvant treatment based on EGFR mutation status and expression of ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1), a predictor of cisplatin response, in patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although the trial met its primary endpoint of ≥ 80% of patients being able to start adjuvant chemotherapy within 2 months of surgery, a phase III trial of the customized approach was cancelled due to unreliability of ERCC1 immunohistochemical readouts."


Editor's note: This trial tested whether a particular molecular testing method could be used to decide which lung cancer patients might benefit from chemotherapy after surgery to keep the cancer from returning. While the results of the trial were promising, the third phase of the trial was canceled because of some unreliability of the molecular testing method. Another method called Pervenio, already performs a similar function.

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The ASCO Post  |  Mar 31, 2014

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ELCC 2014 News: Cabazitaxel Fails to Meet the Primary Endpoint in a Randomised Phase II Study in SCLC Patients

ELCC 2014 News: Cabazitaxel Fails to Meet the Primary Endpoint in a Randomised Phase II Study in SCLC Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Cabazitaxel failed to meet a primary endpoint of showing superior progression-free survival (PFS) and additionally showed less favourable median overall survival (OS) compared to topotecan in an international, randomised open-label phase II trial performed in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), who had progressed during or after first-line platinum-based chemotherapy. The results were presented by Dr Tracey Evans of the Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA in a proffered papers session at the 4th European Lung Cancer Conference (26-29 March 2014, Geneva, Switzerland)."


Editor's note: This trial found disappointing results for the drug cabazitaxel in treating small cell lung cancer (SCLC). To read about promising SCLC treatments, see this blog feature.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ESMO  |  Mar 28, 2014

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