Lung Cancer Dispatch
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Lung Cancer Dispatch
News for Patients and Physicians
Curated by Cancer Commons
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Diets Rich in Antioxidant Resveratrol Fail to Reduce Deaths, Heart Disease or Cancer

Diets Rich in Antioxidant Resveratrol Fail to Reduce Deaths, Heart Disease or Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A study of Italians who consume a diet rich in resveratrol -- the compound found in red wine, dark chocolate and berries -- finds they live no longer than and are just as likely to develop cardiovascular disease or cancer as those who eat or drink smaller amounts of the antioxidant."

Cancer Commons's insight:

ScienceDaily  |  May 12, 2014

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 13, 2014 3:07 PM

ScienceDaily  |  May 12, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 13, 2014 3:07 PM

ScienceDaily  |  May 12, 2014

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Antioxidants May Actually Speed Lung Cancer Growth in Some Cases

Antioxidants May Actually Speed Lung Cancer Growth in Some Cases | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Antioxidants are chemicals that neutralize particles called free radicals that can damage DNA. Preventing such damage may help lower cancer risk for some people. However, tumors themselves can contain high levels of free radicals; by eliminating these free radicals, antioxidants may help cancer cells grow. In a laboratory, lung cancer cells treated with the antioxidants vitamin E and acetylcysteine (ACC) multiplied faster than untreated cells. Vitamin E and ACC also increased tumor growth and decreased survival time in mice with lung cancer. The so-called 'tumor suppressor' protein p53 can sense certain free radicals to detect cells with DNA damage and stop their growth. Antioxidants may interfere with this cancer-suppressing mechanism by reducing free radical levels. Taking antioxidants may therefore not be recommended for lung cancer patients and smokers.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Jan 29, 2014

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An Apple a Day, and Other Myths

An Apple a Day, and Other Myths | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A trip to almost any bookstore or a cruise around the Internet might leave the impression that avoiding cancer is mostly a matter of watching what you eat. One source after another promotes the protective powers of 'superfoods,' rich in antioxidants and other phytochemicals, or advises readers to emulate the diets of Chinese peasants or Paleolithic cave dwellers.


"But there is a yawning divide between this nutritional folklore and science. During the last two decades the connection between the foods we eat and the cellular anarchy called cancer has been unraveling string by string."

Cancer Commons's insight:

The New York Times  |  Apr 21, 2014

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 22, 2014 4:25 PM

The New York Times  |  Apr 21, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 22, 2014 4:25 PM

The New York Times  |  Apr 21, 2014

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Attacking Lung Cancer Cells by Blocking Antioxidants

Attacking Lung Cancer Cells by Blocking Antioxidants | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

As a byproduct of their rapid metabolism and growth, cancer cells frequently produce high levels of so-called free radicals–highly reactive particles that can damage cells. To protect themselves, cancer cells also produce antioxidants, which deactivate the free radicals. Drugs that block these antioxidants should therefore selectively impair cancer cells, while having relatively little effect on healthy cells that do not experience high levels of free radicals. Researchers found that the antioxidant-inhibiting drug ATN-224 induced the death of non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in cell culture. ATN-224 also decreased the number and size of lung tumors in mice injected with NSCLC cells.

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Medical Xpress  |  Dec 2, 2013

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