Lung Cancer Dispatch
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Second Opinion Changes Diagnosis from Incurable to Curable Cancer

Second Opinion Changes Diagnosis from Incurable to Curable Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The Journal of Clinical Oncology reports the case of a woman diagnosed with advanced, incurable lung cancer, whose disease was in fact early stage, curable lung cancer with additional lung lesions due to a rare antibiotic side effect. When her primary lung tumor was surgically removed, and the antibiotic stopped, the 62-year-old woman recovered and may now be cured.


" 'In a good example of collaboration with our local oncology community, my colleague wanted a second opinion to ensure his patient got the best possible treatment plan established from the get-go,' said Ross Camidge, MD, PhD, director of the thoracic oncology clinical program at the University of Colorado Cancer Center and the senior author of the study. 'Initially, they were probably looking for some kind of molecular profiling and possibly a novel drug or combination of drugs in a clinical trial. Instead, through some great teamwork, we were able to reveal something unexpected and radically change her prognosis.' "

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  May 12, 2014

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Gut Bacteria May Be Necessary for Best Response to Cancer Treatment

Gut Bacteria May Be Necessary for Best Response to Cancer Treatment | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The human gut has many bacteria and other microscopic creatures that live inside us, but do not harm us, and may indeed contribute to our health. Now two studies suggest that these bacteria are required for a full response to cancer treatment. Mice that were raised in a sterile environment (and thus lacked any gut bacteria), or whose gut bacteria had been destroyed with antibiotics, were implanted with cancer cells. When these mice were treated with immunotherapy or chemotherapy drugs, their tumors shrank less than those of mice with intact gut bacterial populations. These findings raise concerns for cancer patients, who are frequently treated with antibiotics to control infections due to weakened immune systems.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Nov 21, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:04 PM

Medical Xpress  |  Nov 21, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:04 PM

Medical Xpress  |  Nov 21, 2013