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Lung Cancer Dispatch
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Patient’s Cells Deployed to Attack Aggressive Cancer

Patient’s Cells Deployed to Attack Aggressive Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Doctors have taken an important step toward a long-sought goal: harnessing a person’s own immune system to fight cancer.


"An article published Thursday in the journal Science describes the treatment of a 43-year-old woman with an advanced and deadly type of cancer that had spread from her bile duct to her liver and lungs, despite chemotherapy.


"Researchers at the National Cancer Institute sequenced the genome of her cancer and identified cells from her immune system that attacked a specific mutation in the malignant cells. Then they grew those immune cells in the laboratory and infused billions of them back into her bloodstream.


"The tumors began 'melting away,' said Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg, the senior author of the article and chief of the surgery branch at the cancer institute."


Editor's note: This story is about an "immunotherapy" technique meant to boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. Learn more about immunotherapy here.

Cancer Commons's insight:

New York Times  |  May 8, 2014

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 12, 2:34 PM

New York Times  |  May 8, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 12, 2:34 PM

New York Times  |  May 8, 2014

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Deploying the Body's Army

Deploying the Body's Army | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"More than a century ago, American bone surgeon William Coley came across the case of Fred Stein, whose aggressive cheek sarcoma had disappeared after he suffered a Streptococcus pyogenesinfection following surgery to remove part of the large tumor. Seven years later, Coley tracked Stein down and found him alive, with no evidence of cancer. Amazed, Coley speculated that the immune response to the bacterial infection had played an integral role in fighting the disease, and the doctor went on to inoculate more than 10 other patients suffering from inoperable tumors with Streptococcus bacteria. Sure enough, several of those who survived the infection—and one who did not—experienced tumor reduction."


Editor's note: This article is a great overview of immunotherapy for treating cancer. Immunotherapy drugs boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. Learn more.

Cancer Commons's insight:

The Scientist  |  Apr 1, 2014

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 1, 8:28 PM

The Scientist  |  Apr 1, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 1, 8:28 PM

The Scientist  |  Apr 1, 2014