Lung Cancer Dispatch
Follow
Find tag "adenocarcinoma"
3.6K views | +0 today
Lung Cancer Dispatch
News for Patients and Physicians
Curated by Cancer Commons
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Researchers Develop Process to Help Personalize Treatment for Lung Cancer Patients

"Moffitt Cancer Center researchers, in collaboration with the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium, have developed a process to analyze mutated genes in lung adenocarcinoma to help better select personalized treatment options for patients. Adenocarcinoma is the most common type of lung cancer in the United States with approximately 130,000 people diagnosed each year.


"The study, published in the May 21 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association, investigated 10 highly mutated and altered genes that contribute to cancer progression, termed oncogenic driver genes, in more than 1,000 lung cancer patients. Patients with adenocarcinoma have a high probability of having mutated oncogenic driver genes in their tumors."


Editor's note: More and more, doctors are prescribing personalized cancer treatments based on genetic mutations found in patients' tumors. Learn more about personalized medicine for lung cancer in The Basics.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Jun 3, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Innate Pharma SA begins Phase I Trial with Lirilumab and Nivolumab in Selected Solid Tumors Under Cohort Expansion

"Biopharmaceutical company Innate Pharma SA (euronext paris:FR0010331421) reported on Monday that it has started the cohort expansion portion of the Phase I clinical trial testing the combination of the two investigational checkpoint inhibitors lirilumab and nivolumab in selected solid tumors...


"The company said the trial will test lirilumab (anti-KIR checkpoint inhibitor; BMS-986015) in combination with nivolumab (anti-PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor BMS-936558) in solid tumors. The Phase I open label study will evaluate the safety of the combination of lirilumab and nivolumab and to provide preliminary information on the clinical activity of the combination. The primary outcome is safety."


Editor's note: Nivolumab is an immunotherapy drug that activates the immune system's T cells in the hopes that the patient's own immune system will be prompted to fight tumors. Nivolumab has already been shown to be a promising melanoma treatment on its own. Lirilumab is a drug that activates a different group of immune system cells known as natural killer cells (NK). This clinical trial combines both drugs to see if they work better together.

Cancer Commons's insight:

MENAFN  |  Mar 31, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

ELCC 2014 News: Efficacy and Safety of Targeted Therapy in Elderly Patients With Lung Cancer Adenocarcinoma

"Clinical records of elderly patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) show that treatment with bevacizumab seems to be safe and effective in patients with controlled pre-existing cardiovascular disease and good performance status. Furthermore, another targeted agent, erlotinib, represents a valuable treatment option in elderly NSCLC patients with co-morbidities, especially if they harbour EGFR mutations. The data were presented by Prof. Kostas Syrigos on behalf of colleagues from the Oncology Unit, Sotiria General Hospital, Athens School of Medicine, Athens, Greece in a general poster session at the 4th European Lung Cancer Conference (26-29 March 2014, Geneva, Switzerland)."

Cancer Commons's insight:

ESMO  |  Mar 27, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Positive Results For Vargatef in Lung Cancer Study

Positive Results For Vargatef in Lung Cancer Study | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

New clinical trial results suggest that adding the drug nintedanib (Vargatef) to second-line chemotherapy can improve survival for some patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with advanced NSCLC whose cancer had progressed after first-line chemotherapy received either Vargatef and the chemotherapy drug docetaxel (Taxotere) or Taxotere alone. On the whole, Vargatef was associated with slightly longer times without worsening of the cancer (3.4 months vs 2.7 in the Taxotere-only group), but no improvement in overall survival. However, in patients with lung adenocarcinoma, a subtype of NSCLC, the addition of Vargatef improved overall survival by over 2 months (12.6 months vs 10.3 with Taxotere alone). Vargatef disrupts the formation of new blood vessels that feed growing tumors.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Clinical Oncology News  |  Oct, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Trial Results for New Lung Cancer Drug Ganetespib Leave Some Skeptical

Trial Results for New Lung Cancer Drug Ganetespib Leave Some Skeptical | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The GALAXY-1 clinical trial examines patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), receiving either ganetespib (a new cancer drug) and docetaxel (Taxotere, a chemotherapy drug) or Taxotere alone as second-line treatment. Recent interim results show ganetespib-treated patients surviving 10.4 months on average (vs 8.4 months in the Taxotere-only group) and experiencing a 10% reduction in the risk of death. This is a smaller difference than was seen in preliminary results in September, 2012 and June, 2013 (31% and 18% reduction in risk of death, respectively). It is also unclear whether the effect is indeed caused by ganetespib or due to chance. However, the drug’s makers emphasize that ganetespib may be more effective in certain patient subgroups.

Cancer Commons's insight:

The Street | Oct 27, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

FDA Greenlights NSCLC Vaccine Trial for Subgroups

An experimental lung cancer vaccine does not extend life overall, but may still benefit some people, leading the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to approve further trials for these groups. These findings were reported at the 2013 European Cancer Congress in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Called belagenpumatucel-L, the vaccine is based on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and boosts the immune response. The phase III clinical trial included 532 people with NSCLC who had already undergone chemotherapy and the vaccine benefitted two subgroups. People who had previously been treated with radiation lived longer (40 mo with radiation vs 10 mo without radiation), as did people whose lung cancers were not adenocarcinomas (20 mo for nonadenocarcinomas vs 12 mo for adenocarcinomas).

Cancer Commons's insight:

European Society for Medical Oncology│Sep 28, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Researchers Identify Critical Gene Involved in Lung Cancer Growth

Researchers Identify Critical Gene Involved in Lung Cancer Growth | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Notch genes are a family of genes that are involved in cancer growth. However, they also control many other biological functions, so drugs blocking all Notch genes are severely toxic. Now, researchers have identified one specific member of this gene family that plays a particularly important role in at least some cancers. Inhibiting this gene, Notch1, prevented tumor growth and caused cancer cells to die in both cell culture and animal models of lung adenocarcinoma, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Drugs selectively targeting Notch1 may offer a less toxic approach to halting lung cancer growth.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress | Aug 29, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Particulate Matter Air Pollution Contributes to Increased Risk of Lung Cancer in Europe

Ambient air pollution has been associated with lung cancer risk. In a study reported in Lancet Oncology by Ole Raaschou-Nielsen, PhD, of the Danish Cancer Society Research Center, and colleagues, lung cancer incidence in European countries was prospectively assessed according to several measures of air pollution exposure. The study showed that particulate matter air pollution contributes to risk of lung cancer, particularly adenocarcinoma.

Cancer Commons's insight:

The ASCO Post. Jul 29, 2013.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Genetic Characteristics of Women With Lung Cancer Differ Depending on Smoking History

Few studies so far have focused specifically on lung cancer in women, despite increasing evidence of differences in lung cancer features between women and men. A striking example is the higher rate among women of nonsmokers who develop lung cancer. A recent study of women with lung adenocarcinoma, a type of non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), found that those who had never smoked were much more likely to have mutations in the EGFR gene and/or abnormally high levels of estrogen receptors, while smokers were more likely to have mutations in the KRAS gene. Based on these findings, a new phase II clinical trial will explore the effectiveness of treating postmenopausal, nonsmoking women who have advanced non-squamous lung cancer with EGFR inhibitors and anti-estrogen drugs.

Cancer Commons's insight:

International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer | June 24, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Cancer Drug Targeting BRAF Gene May Be Effective in Lung Cancer

A small subset of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), especially those with lung adenocarcinoma, have a mutation in the BRAF gene called V600E. An ongoing phase II clinical trial is investigating whether the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib (Tafinlar) benefits patients with this mutation. Tafinlar is currently approved for treatment of the skin cancer melanoma. Recently released trial results show that the drug partially shrank tumors in 40% of advanced NSCLC patients whose cancer had worsened after at least one round of chemotherapy. Another 20% of study participants maintained stable disease (tumors neither shrinking nor growing). Almost half of the patients currently remain on the treatment. These findings are the first evidence that treatments targeting the BRAF V600E mutation may be effective in lung cancer.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ASCO Daily News | June 4, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

RET Mutations May Emerge as New Target for Lung Cancer Treatments

RET Mutations May Emerge as New Target for Lung Cancer Treatments | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A certain type of mutation in a protein, called RET, occurs in a significant subset of lung cancer patients, a recent study shows. Known as 'rearrangements,' these mutations fuse the RET gene with other nearby genes, resulting in a RET protein that contains parts of other proteins and is hyperactive. Patients with similar rearrangement mutations in another gene, ALK, can experience drastic improvements from treatment with ALK inhibitors such as crizotinib (Xalkori). This raises the hope that patients with RET rearrangement mutations may be similarly helped by drugs that block RET–either novel RET inhibitors or existing tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as vandetanib (Caprelsa), sunitinib (Sutent), sorafenib (Nexavar), or ponatinib (Iclusig). Identifying patients who may benefit from such treatments would be made easier by the new test for RET mutations developed by the study’s authors. When examining a group of patients with lung adenocarcinoma, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who did not have mutations in other cancer-relevant genes, the researchers found that 15% had RET rearrangement mutations.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress | June 3, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Testing for EGFR and ALK Mutations Recommended for All Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients

Testing for EGFR and ALK Mutations Recommended for All Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

All patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the lung, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), should be tested for mutations in the EGFR and ALK genes, according to guidelines developed by three prominent professional medical societies. Mutations in these genes predict a much higher likelihood of benefitting from treatment with EGFR inhibitors like erlotinib (Tarceva) and gefitinib (Iressa), or ALK inhibitors like crizotinib (Xalkori), respectively. The tests should be performed for all adenocarcinoma patients as soon as advanced disease is detected, regardless of sex, race, smoking history, or other clinical risk factors.

Cancer Commons's insight:

MedPage Today | Apr 5, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Switching from Iressa to Tarceva Halts Drug-Induced Immune Suppression in Lung Cancer Patient

Switching from Iressa to Tarceva Halts Drug-Induced Immune Suppression in Lung Cancer Patient | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Neutropenia (a reduction in white blood cells) is a rare, but potentially serious side effect of the cancer drug gefitinib (Iressa). Iressa is used to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with mutations in the EGFR gene. A patient with EGFR-mutant advanced adenocarcinoma of the lung (a type of NSCLC) was treated with Iressa. Her tumor shrank, but she experienced severe neutropenia, leaving her at risk of dangerous infections. She was switched to erlotinib (Tarceva), another EGFR inhibitor, after which her neutropenia cleared up. The patient has since continued on Tarceva without neutropenia or cancer progression for over nine months. This case suggests that Iressa-induced neutropenia can be safely treated by switching to Tarceva, although caution should be used in drawing conclusions from a single case study.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Lung Cancer | Mar 14, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

US ‘Proof-of-Concept’ Trial Confirms Promise of Stratified Lung Cancer Treatment

US ‘Proof-of-Concept’ Trial Confirms Promise of Stratified Lung Cancer Treatment | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Routine tests that look for multiple, specific genetic changes in patients’ lung tumours could help doctors select targeted treatments, a US study has confirmed.


"The research, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, looked simultaneously for ten specific cancer-driving genetic changes in the tumours of 733 patients with adenocarcinoma, the most common type of lung cancer."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Cancer Research UK  |  May 21, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Nintedanib: New Oral Angiogenesis Inhibitor in Lung Cancer

"A new oral angiogenesis inhibitor for the treatment of lung cancer could be edging closer to the market: Approval application for nintedanib (Boehringer Ingelheim) has been filed in Europe and is being prepared for the United States.


"The data for nintedanib come from the phase 3 trial known as LUME-Lung-1, recently published in the Lancet Oncology."


Editor's note: We previously posted a story about the potential benefits of the drug nintedanib for some patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medscape  |  Mar 28, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

New Targeted Drugs May Offer Treatment for KRAS-Mutant Lung Cancer

New Targeted Drugs May Offer Treatment for KRAS-Mutant Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Abnormalities in the KRAS gene are the most common mutations in lung cancer, especially in lung adenocarcinoma, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, no effective targeted therapy directed at KRAS has been found. Instead, researchers have begun to focus on blocking molecules 'downstream' in the chain of chemical reactions through which KRAS affects the cell. Two such molecules are TBK1 and MEK. A recent study found that the drug CYT387 blocks TBK1. CYT387 reduced tumor growth in mice with KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinoma. Also in mice, CYT387 and the MEK inhibitor AZD6244, given together, shrank aggressive lung tumors with mutations in both the KRAS and the TP53 gene. Researchers now hope to investigate the two drugs in people.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ASCO Post  |  Jan 29, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Genetic Test Can Predict Risk of Death in Lung Cancer

Genetic Test Can Predict Risk of Death in Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new test for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients may help guide treatment decisions. The myPlan Lung Cancer test analyzes gene expression in patients with early-stage lung adenocarcinoma, a type of NSCLC, to predict their chances of dying within the next 5 years. A study showed that patients with a high-risk myPlan Lung Cancer score had nearly double the risk of death (35%) than patients with a low-risk score (18%). myPlan Lung Cancer results were better predictors of survival than cancer stage; tumor size; or the patient's age, sex, or smoking status. More accurate risk predictions could help identify early-stage NSCLC patients for whom aggressive treatment after surgery would be advisable despite the possibility of side effects.

Cancer Commons's insight:

MarketWatch | Oct 29, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Genetic Mutation May Offer New Treatment Target for Some Lung Cancers

Genetic Mutation May Offer New Treatment Target for Some Lung Cancers | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

DNA analyses of lung adenocarcinomas, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), found that some tumors contain a kind of mutation called a gene fusion in a gene called NTRK1. The mutation consists of NTRK1, which is involved in cell growth, merging with a different gene. As a result, the gene’s product, a protein called TRKA, is continuously 'switched on,' independent of the signals that normally activate it. Treating cell cultures of lung cancer cells containing the NTRK1 gene fusion with TRKA inhibitors suppressed their growth. Patients with gene fusions in another gene, ALK, experience tumor shrinkage in response to treatment with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib (Xalkori). Similarly, TRKA inhibitors may act as targeted therapies for lung adenocarcinoma patients with NTRK1 mutations.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ScienceDaily | Oct 27, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

FDA Puts Lung Cancer Drug Ganetespib on Fast Track

FDA Puts Lung Cancer Drug Ganetespib on Fast Track | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Ganetespib, a potential new treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), has been granted Fast Track status by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Fast Track status, reserved for drugs aimed at serious conditions with unmet treatment needs, provides for closer FDA guidance during the drug development process and quicker review for approval. Two clinical trials, GALAXY-1 and GALAXY-2, are currently examining the use of ganetespib in combination with the chemotherapy agent Taxotere (docetaxel) for treating advanced lung adenocarcinoma, a type of NSCLC. Ganetespib acts by blocking Hsp90, a protein that facilitates several components of tumor development and spread.

Cancer Commons's insight:

MarketWatch | Sep 12, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Tissue Analysis May Help Predict Risk of Early-Stage Lung Cancer Returning

Tissue Analysis May Help Predict Risk of Early-Stage Lung Cancer Returning | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The tissue types present in early-stage lung adenocarcinomas, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), may help predict the chances of the cancer returning after surgery. A retrospective study examined outcomes among adenocarcinoma patients whose tumors were 2 cm in diameter or smaller. Patients whose tumors contained 5% or more of a so-called 'micropapillary' tissue structure had a higher risk of the cancer returning if they had just the tumor removed. This difference was not found in patients who underwent lobectomy (removal of an entire subsection of lung). The higher risk of recurrence in patients with 5%-plus micropapillary tissue in their tumor may make them better candidates for the more invasive lobectomy procedure.

Cancer Commons's insight:

MedPage Today | Aug 7, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

RNA Diagnostic Test Improves Diagnosis of Lung Cancer

RNA Diagnostic Test Improves Diagnosis of Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The first step towards choosing the best lung cancer treatment is to figure out what specific kind of lung cancer a patient has. Usually, doctors can determine cancer type by surgically removing part of a tumor and examining the appearance of tumor cells under a microscope. But sometimes tumor samples are damaged and difficult to analyze visually, so a second method would be useful to help confirm a diagnosis. Researchers have now developed a new test that can determine which genes are turned on or off in tumor cells, allowing them to distinguish between the most common types of lung cancer (adenocarcinoma, carcinoid, small cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma). Samples of tumors are already routinely collected, and, in an experiment, examining them and analyzing their genetics was found to be a viable predictor of a tumor’s microscopic appearance. Researchers hope that their test will bring more accurate diagnoses to doctors and patients, which in turn could lead to better treatment recommendations and better outcomes.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress | Jul 16, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

New Cancer Drug Ganetespib May Extend Survival in Late-Stage Lung Cancer

New Cancer Drug Ganetespib May Extend Survival in Late-Stage Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The new cancer treatment ganetespib produced encouraging results in a phase II/III clinical trial examining its effectiveness on late-stage lung adenocarcinoma, a form of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients received ganetespib in combination with docetaxel (Taxotere) or Taxotere alone. Ganetespib treatment resulted in longer overall survival (9.8 months compared to 7.4 months in Taxotere-only patients). Ganetespib inhibits a protein called Hsp90 that acts as a so-called molecular chaperone: it helps different proteins assume their final shape, thus allowing them to function. Many proteins 'chaperoned' by Hsp90 can drive tumor growth in cancer. Researchers hope that blocking Hsp90 with ganetespib will be effective even in patients who have developed mutations that make them resistant to other anticancer drugs, because even the mutated proteins likely still need Hsp90 to function. An ongoing phase III clinical trial seeks to confirm these results.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress | Jun 3, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

New Cancer Drug Vargatef Extends Progression-Free Period in Lung Cancer

Patients treated with the new cancer drug nintedanib (Vargatef), in addition to second-line chemotherapy, experienced a longer delay before their lung cancer worsened, a recent phase III clinical trial showed. The study focused on patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose cancer had progressed after a first round of chemotherapy. Trial participants received the chemotherapy agent docetaxel (Taxotere) either with or without Vargatef. Those treated with Vargatef went an average of 3.4 months before their cancer started to grow again, compared to 2.7 in patients who were given Taxotere alone. There was also evidence that Vargatef may increase overall survival, especially in patients with lung adenocarcinoma, a subtype of NSCLC.

Cancer Commons's insight:

PR Newswire | June 3, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Lung Cancer Patient with ROS1 Mutation Responds to Xalkori

Lung Cancer Patient with ROS1 Mutation Responds to Xalkori | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A patient with advanced lung adenocarcinoma, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), had relapsed from, or failed to respond to, numerous chemotherapy agents and targeted therapies and was deteriorating rapidly. Previous molecular testing had found no mutations in commonly tested biomarker genes, but a follow-up test detected a mutation in the ROS1 gene. The patient then started treatment with crizotinib (Xalkori) and experienced a dramatic improvement, including tumor shrinkage. Xalkori treatment has continued for 12 weeks so far, with no sign of cancer progression. This case demonstrates the remarkable effectiveness that Xalkori can have in ROS1-mutant NSCLC, as well as the need for prompt and comprehensive molecular testing for all NSCLC patients.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Lung Cancer | Apr 4, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

New Drug May Be Effective for Lung Cancer Patients with RET Mutations

New Drug May Be Effective for Lung Cancer Patients with RET Mutations | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Some patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have tumor mutations called "RET fusions." RET fusions are especially common in patients who have adenocarcinoma, never smoked, and/or have no mutations in other genes commonly associated with NSCLC. In an ongoing phase II clinical trial, three patients with adenocarcinoma and RET fusions appeared to respond well to the drug cabozantinib (Cometriq). The tumors of two of the patients shrank during Cometriq treatment, while the third experienced stable disease. Further studies are needed, but these results suggest that Cometriq may be an effective treatment for NSCLC patients with RET fusions. Research paper: http://cancerdiscovery.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2013/03/23/2159-8290.CD-13-0035.abstract

Cancer Commons's insight:

Cancer Discovery | Mar 26, 2013

more...
No comment yet.