Lung Cancer Dispatch
Follow
Find tag "T790M"
3.5K views | +0 today
Lung Cancer Dispatch
News for Patients and Physicians
Curated by Cancer Commons
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Clovis Launches TIGER2 Trial for CO-1686 in Previously Treated T790M-Positive NSCLC Patients

Clovis Launches TIGER2 Trial for CO-1686 in Previously Treated T790M-Positive NSCLC Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Clovis Oncology has launched the TIGER2 study for its non-small cell lung cancer drug CO-1686, an agent the company is studying as a treatment for advanced patients with tumors characterized by EGFR mutations and the T790M resistance mutation.


"CO-1686 is an irreversible EGFR inhibitor. Clovis this week said it has dosed the first patient in the TIGER2 Phase I/II trial, which is focused on gauging the efficacy of CO-1686 in NSCLC patients who have progressed on their first and only anti-EGFR treatment."

Editor's note: Some people with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have tumor cells with mutations in the EGFR gene (oncologists often use a tumor biopsy to check for this mutation in a patient). These patients can be treated with targeted drugs known as EGFR inhibitors. EGFR inhibitors can shrink tumors at first, but over time, tumors may become resistant to the drugs and start growing again. Often, this is because of a new, additional mutation that occurs in the EGFR gene called T790M. A new clinical trial is enrolling volunteer patients with the T790M mutation to test a new drug meant to overcome EGFR inhibitor resistance. The drug is called CO1-686.
Cancer Commons's insight:

Pharmacogenomics Reporter  |  Jun 25, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Researchers Report Double Dose of Promising Lung Cancer Findings

Researchers Report Double Dose of Promising Lung Cancer Findings | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Researchers with UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Centerreport that two new experimental drugs have shown great promise in the treatment of patients with non–small-cell lung cancer, which accounts for about 85 percent of all lung cancers. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States.


"The drugs—ramucirumab and CO-1868—were shown in separate clinical trials to increase survival times with fewer toxic side effects than standard treatments. The findings were presented this week at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting in Chicago."


Editor's note: For more on the ramucirumab findings, see our previous news post. To learn more about targeted therapies like CO-1686 and ramucirumab, visit our lung cancer Basics.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Jun 5, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

New EGFR Inhibitor AZD9291 Shows Promising Activity in Treatment-Resistant Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

New EGFR Inhibitor AZD9291 Shows Promising Activity in Treatment-Resistant Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Findings from a phase I study of a new mutant-selective epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, AZD9291, point to a promising new treatment option for patients with advanced, EGFR-mutant, non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that is resistant to standard EGFR inhibitors. Roughly 50% of patients experienced tumor shrinkage, and the drug worked particularly well in patients with the T790M mutation (detected in 60% of patients), which causes the most common form of EGFR therapy resistance. The study was presented at a presscast in advance of the 2014 ASCO Annual Meeting (Abstract 8009^)."


Editor's note: This story is about a new targeted therapy drug called AZD9291 that is designed to attack tumors with a mutation in the EGFR gene, as detected by molecular testing. In particular, it is designed for patients who are resistant to other so-called EGFR inhibitors as a result of developing a particular EGFR mutation known as T790M. In a clinical trial to test the drug in patients, it was found to show promising results for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with EGFR mutations, and even better results in patients with the T790M mutation.

Cancer Commons's insight:

The ASCO Post  |  May 14, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Clovis Oncology’s CO-1686 Demonstrates Compelling Clinical Activity and Progression-free Survival (PFS) in Updated Phase 1 Study Results in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

"Clovis Oncology (NASDAQ:CLVS) announced today updated findings from the Phase 1 portion of its ongoing Phase 1/2 clinical study of CO-1686, the Company’s novel, oral, targeted covalent (irreversible) inhibitor of mutant forms of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in patients with initial activating EGFR mutations as well as the dominant resistance mutation T790M. Interim results from the Phase 1 dose-escalation portion of this Phase 1/2 study are being presented today in an oral presentation by Dr. Heather Wakelee at the 4th European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC) in Geneva."


Editor's note: CO-1686 is a targeted therapy drug that is meant to treat patients whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene, as detected by molecular testing. Some tumors with EGFR mutations become resistant to treatment and develop a new mutation called T790M. Researchers are particularly interested in whether patients with T790M can benefit from CO-1686.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Reuters  |  Mar 27, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Early Evidence Supports CO-1686 as a Treatment Option in Drug-Resistant EGFR-Mutant Lung Cancer

Early Evidence Supports CO-1686 as a Treatment Option in Drug-Resistant EGFR-Mutant Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Drugs known as EGFR inhibitors—such as erlotinib (Tarceva), gefitinib (Iressa), and afatinib (Gilotrif)—are very effective in treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with mutations in the EGFR gene. However, patients eventually develop drug resistance, usually caused by new EGFR mutations. T790M is the most common EGFR drug resistance mutation. CO-1686 is a novel drug that inhibits EGFR with the T790M mutation, as well as other mutant EGFR. A small study showed that eight of nine patients who had the T790M resistance mutation experienced more than 10% tumor shrinkage when treated with CO-1686. And, a new formulation of CO-1686 has been found to produce higher, more consistent, well-tolerated drug concentrations in patients.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Yahoo! Finance | Oct 27, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

First T790M Inhibitor Shows Promise in Early Lung Cancer Trial

First T790M Inhibitor Shows Promise in Early Lung Cancer Trial | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Researchers may finally have found a treatment for a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that resists currently available therapies, according results presented at the 2013 European Cancer Congress in Amsterdam, Netherlands. These resistant NSCLCs have an EGFR mutation called T790M, which is more common in Asian people; the experimental treatment is a T790M inhibitor called AZD9291. In an ongoing phase I clinical trial that included 12 people with lung cancers that had the T790M mutation, tumors shrank in more than half. This trial is currently enrolling new patients.

Cancer Commons's insight:

The Street│Sep 30, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Clinical Trial Seeks to Find People with Mutation That May Confer High Risk for Lung Cancer

Many lung cancer patients have never smoked. Some nonsmokers may be at high risk of developing lung cancer due to inherited genetic mutations. While lung cancer patients often have mutations in their tumor tissue, some also carry genetic mutations in all cells of their body, which were present even before the cancer. The INHERIT EGFR clinical trial by the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Addario Lung Cancer Medical Institute studies a specific mutation in the EGFR gene called T790M. The trial is recruiting patients with the T790M mutation in their tumors who have a high chance of carrying the otherwise very rare mutation in all of their body cells, along with their relatives, who may also carry the mutation. Researchers will investigate whether people with the T790M mutation indeed have a higher risk of developing lung cancer. The findings may help to develop better ways to detect lung cancer sooner or to reduce the risk of developing the disease.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Lung Cancer Foundation | May 14, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

At ASCO, Next-Gen EGFR Inhibitors Show Early Promise in Lung Cancer Patients with T790M Mutations

"Next-generation EGFR inhibitors for treating metastatic non-small cell lung cancer patients who have acquired resistance to first-generation drugs in this class accurately hit mutant EGFR tumor cells and caused fewer serious side effects, early data presented at a major cancer conference showed.


"Researchers at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's annual meeting here this week, presented preliminary data from human studies on three next-generation EGFR inhibitors: AstraZeneca's AZD9291, Clovis Oncology's CO-1686, and Hanmi Pharmaceutical's HM61713. All three agents showed promising activity against patients who had EGFR mutations, had received prior treatment with a first-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor – such as Roche's Tarceva (erlotinib) and AstraZeneca's Iressa (gefinitib) – and had T790M mutations."


Editor's note: For a more reader-friendly explanation of these new drugs, check out the "Drug resistance" section of our Chief Scientist's latest blog post.

Cancer Commons's insight:

GenomeWeb  |  Jun 4, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Clovis Oncology Receives Breakthrough Therapy Designation for CO-1686
for the Treatment of Second-line EGFR Mutant Non-small Cell Lung Cancer
(NSCLC) in Patients with the T790M Mutation

Clovis Oncology Receives Breakthrough Therapy Designation for CO-1686 <br/>      for the Treatment of Second-line EGFR Mutant Non-small Cell Lung Cancer <br/>      (NSCLC) in Patients with the T790M Mutation | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Clovis Oncology, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Breakthrough Therapy designation for the Company’s investigational agent CO-1686 as monotherapy for the treatment of second-line EGFR mutant NSCLC in patients with the T790M mutation. The Breakthrough Therapy designation was granted based on interim efficacy and safety results from an ongoing Phase 1/2 study of CO-1686. CO-1686 is the Company’s novel, oral, targeted covalent (irreversible) inhibitor of mutant forms of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in patients with initial activating EGFR mutations as well as the dominant resistance mutation T790M."


Editor's note: CO-1686 is a targeted therapy drug that is meant to treat patients whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene, as detected by molecular testing. Some tumors with EGFR mutations become resistant to first-line treatment and develop a new mutation called T790M. Evidence shows that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with T790M may benefit from second-line treatment with CO-1686.The drug has received a Breakthrough Therapy designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This means that the FDA finds CO-1686 to be very promising compared to currently available treatments for T790M-mutated NSCLC, and will accelerate the approval process that would ultimately permit oncologists to prescribe the drug outside of a clinical trial.

Cancer Commons's insight:

MarketWatch  |  May 19, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Combination Therapies for Lung Cancer

Combination Therapies for Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"CANCER NETWORK: Dr. Jänne, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors are a mainstay of therapy for those advanced-stage lung cancer patients with tumors that harbor specific EGFR mutations. What have we learned in the last few years about which patients respond to which oral agents and antibodies against EGFR? "


Editor's note: While not strictly "news," this interview provides a good overview of currently available treatments for lung cancer.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Cancer Network  |  Apr 25, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Inherited Mutated Gene Raises Lung Cancer Risk for Women, Those Who Never Smoked

Inherited Mutated Gene Raises Lung Cancer Risk for Women, Those Who Never Smoked | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"People who have an inherited mutation of a certain gene have a high chance of getting lung cancer—higher, even, than heavy smokers with or without the inherited mutation, according to new findings by cancer researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center. Although both genders have an equal risk of inheriting the mutation, those who develop lung cancer are mostly women and have never smoked, the researchers found.


"People with the rare inherited T790M mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene who have never smoked have a one-in-three chance of developing lung cancer, researchers found. This risk is considerably greater than that of the average heavy smoker, who has about a one-in-eight chance of developing lung cancer – about 40- fold greater than people who have never smoked and do not have the mutation."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Mar 24, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

New Drug May Offer Option for Lung Cancer Patients Resistant to Tarceva/Iressa

New Drug May Offer Option for Lung Cancer Patients Resistant to Tarceva/Iressa | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Drugs known as EGFR inhibitors—like erlotinib (Tarceva) and gefitinib (Iressa)—are used to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with so-called 'activating mutations' in the EGFR gene. Unfortunately, drug resistance develops relatively quickly in most patients. Resistance is often due to additional EGFR mutations, so-called 'resistance mutations,' such as EGFR T790M. Researcher have developed a new EGFR inhibitor, AZD9291, which targets both activating and resistance mutant forms of EGFR. AZD9291 inhibited the growth of EGFR-mutant NSCLC cell cultures and eradicated lung cancer tumors with either activating or resistance mutations in mice. Because AZD9291 is less active against normal, non-mutant EGFR, it may have fewer side effects than other EGFR inhibitors. Initial tests of AZD9291 in patients have been promising.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ScienceDaily | Oct 20, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Patients with Drug-Resistant Lung Cancer Might Benefit from New Drug CO-1686

Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have mutations in the EGFR gene often improve significantly when treated with EGFR inhibitors like erlotinib (Tarceva) or gefitinib (Iressa). However, in virtually all cases, patients eventually develop resistance to these drugs. Resistance to EGFR inhibitors is frequently associated with patients developing an additional mutation in the EGFR gene called T790M. Hope for these patients may come from a new EGFR inhibitor designed to target the T790M mutation, called CO-1686. Preliminary results from an ongoing early clinical trial of CO-1686 show that the drug shrank tumors in at least a subset of patients with EGFR-mutant advanced NSCLC who were resistant to EGFR inhibitors and carried the T790M mutation.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Reuters | June 3, 2013

more...
No comment yet.