Lung Cancer Dispatch
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Ignyta Announces Interim Data from RXDX-101 Phase I Clinical Trial (NASDAQ:RXDX)

"Ignyta, Inc. (Nasdaq: RXDX), an oncology precision medicine biotechnology company, announced today that interim results from the first-in-human ALKA-372-001 Phase I clinical trial of RXDX-101, the company's proprietary oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting solid tumor indications, were presented in an oral presentation at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology(ASCO) in Chicago, Illinois."


Editor's note: This story is about a new drug called RXDX-101. In a clinical trial testing it in volunteer patients, it showed promise for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors had mutations in the ALK gene, and another patient with NSCLC whose tumor had a mutation in the ROS1 gene (these mutations can be detected by molecular testing).

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Ignyta  |  May 31, 2014

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New Drug May Overcome Resistance to Xalkori

New Drug May Overcome Resistance to Xalkori | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The drug crizotinib (Xalkori) is used to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with mutations in the ALK gene. However, most patients develop resistance to the drug, usually because of further mutations in the ALK gene. A new ALK inhibitor drug, PF-06463922, may offer a solution. PF-06463922 blocked a variety of Xalkori-resistant mutant versions of ALK in cell cultures, and inhibited the growth of Xalkori-resistant ALK-mutant tumors in mice. PF-06463922 also combated tumor cells driven by mutations in ROS1, a gene closely related to ALK, in mouse models. Like Xalkori, PF-06463922 may therefore also be effective for NSCLC patients with ROS1 mutations. Finally, PF-06463922 was able to penetrate into the brain in multiple animal species–important because lung cancer often spreads to the brain.

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ScienceDaily | Oct 20, 2013

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Case of Resistance to Xalkori Linked to New Mutation in ROS1 Gene

Case of Resistance to Xalkori Linked to New Mutation in ROS1 Gene | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Crizotinib (Xalkori) is an effective treatment for lung cancer patients with mutations in the ALK or the ROS1 gene. However, patients usually develop resistance to the drug after some time. A patient with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with a ROS1 mutation improved significantly at first after enrolling in a clinical trial assessing Xalkori. However, after 3 months, her cancer again began to worsen despite continued Xalkori treatment. Genetic testing revealed that she had developed a new, additional mutation in the ROS1 gene that makes cells more resistant to Xalkori. The new mutation was present in all of the tumors that had stopped responding to the drug. A better understanding of the way in which cancer cells develop resistance to targeted therapies is critical for developing new treatments that can overcome drug resistance.

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New England Journal of Medicine | June 1, 2013

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Responses with Crizotinib in MET-Amplified Lung Cancer Show New Targetable Form of Disease

Responses with Crizotinib in MET-Amplified Lung Cancer Show New Targetable Form of Disease | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"In 2011, the drug crizotinib earned accelerated approval by the US FDA to target the subset of advanced non-small cell lung cancers caused by rearrangements of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene, and subsequently was granted regular approval in 2013. The drug also has shown dramatic responses in patients whose lung cancers harbored a different molecular abnormality, namely ROS1 gene rearrangements. Previously unreported phase 1 clinical trial results now show that crizotinib may have a third important molecular target. In advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients with intermediate and high amplifications of the MET gene, crizotinib produced either disease stabilization or tumor response. Sixty-seven percent of patients with high MET amplification showed prolonged response to the drug, which lasted from approximately 6 months to nearly 2.5 years."


Editor's note: Crizotinib (aka Xalkori) is a targeted therapy drug that kills cancer cells by targeting certain molecules found in the cells. It was already known that crizotinib works well for some patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose cancer cells have mutations in the ALK gene and in the ROS1 gene; such mutations, or "molecular biomarkers," are detected by a medical procedure known as "molecular testing," or "genetic testing." Now, scientists say that crizotinib may also be effective for patients with advanced NSCLC whose tumors have abnormally high activity of a protein called MET, which can also be detected via molecular testing.

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ScienceDaily  |  May 31, 2014

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Biomarker-Guided Targeted Therapy Is Becoming a Reality

A massive database study performed recently in France demonstrates that genetic testing of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors for disease-relevant biomarkers is feasible, and indeed already helps guide treatment strategies for patients. France’s National Cancer Institute funds routine assessment of genetic alterations in six genes for NSCLC patients: EGFR, KRAS, ALK, BRAF, HER2, and PI3K. Since April 2012, these genetic analyses have been collected into a database. By now, biomarker assessments have been performed for 10,000 NSCLC patients. Of the patients for whom treatment data was available, over half received therapies guided directly by their biomarker testing profile. For example, over half of patients who were found to have a mutation in the EGFR gene were treated with EGFR inhibitors. As the database continues to grow, researchers recommend that newer biomarkers, like the ROS1 gene, should be added to the analysis. Furthermore, they urge that the availability of clinical trials of biomarker-targeted treatments needs to be increased.

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CancerNetwork | Jun 4, 2013

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CollabRx Updates Online Tool for Finding Targeted Therapies for Lung Cancer

CollabRx Updates Online Tool for Finding Targeted Therapies for Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

CollabRx has released a new version of its Therapy Finder™ application for lung cancer, an online tool that recommends targeted therapies and clinical trials to physicians based on genetic information about a patient’s tumor. Available at http://therapy.collabrx.com/lung/, the updated application incorporates information about mutations in the ROS1 gene, which can make patients eligible for treatment with a class of drugs called ALK inhibitors, including crizotinib (Xalkori). The new tool also includes updated information about selumetinib, an investigational drug that may benefit patients whose tumors carry a mutation in the KRAS gene.

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GlobeNewswire | Feb 7, 2013

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