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Dicerna Pharmaceuticals Initiates Phase 1 Study of DCR-MYC in
Patients with Solid Tumors and Hematological Malignancies

Dicerna Pharmaceuticals Initiates Phase 1 Study of DCR-MYC in <br/>      Patients with Solid Tumors and Hematological Malignancies | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Dicerna Pharmaceuticals, Inc. DRNA +0.67% , a leader in the development of RNAi-based therapeutics, today announced the initiation of a Phase 1 dose-escalating clinical study of DCR-MYC, (also known as DCR-M1711), in patients with solid tumors, multiple myeloma, or lymphoma. DCR-MYC, Dicerna’s first drug candidate to enter clinical testing, is a Dicer Substrate siRNA (DsiRNA) that targets the driver oncogene MYC, which is central to the growth of many hematologic and solid tumor malignancies. Dicerna is investigating DCR-MYC in a variety of tumor types with the initial focus on hepatocellular carcinoma."


Editor's note: This new drug may hold promise for people with lung cancer or melanoma, as well as other cancer types.

Cancer Commons's insight:

MarketWatch  |  Apr 16, 2014

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 18, 2:29 PM

MarketWatch  |  Apr 16, 2014

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RNA Diagnostic Test Improves Diagnosis of Lung Cancer

RNA Diagnostic Test Improves Diagnosis of Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

The first step towards choosing the best lung cancer treatment is to figure out what specific kind of lung cancer a patient has. Usually, doctors can determine cancer type by surgically removing part of a tumor and examining the appearance of tumor cells under a microscope. But sometimes tumor samples are damaged and difficult to analyze visually, so a second method would be useful to help confirm a diagnosis. Researchers have now developed a new test that can determine which genes are turned on or off in tumor cells, allowing them to distinguish between the most common types of lung cancer (adenocarcinoma, carcinoid, small cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma). Samples of tumors are already routinely collected, and, in an experiment, examining them and analyzing their genetics was found to be a viable predictor of a tumor’s microscopic appearance. Researchers hope that their test will bring more accurate diagnoses to doctors and patients, which in turn could lead to better treatment recommendations and better outcomes.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress | Jul 16, 2013

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