Lung Cancer Dispatch
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A New Tool to Confront Lung Cancer

A New Tool to Confront Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Only 15% of patients with squamous cell lung cancer – the second most common lung cancer – survive five years past diagnosis. Little is understood about how the deadly disease arises, preventing development of targeted therapies that could serve as a second line of defense once standard chemotherapy regimens fail.


"Published online in Cell Reports on June 19, Huntsman Cancer Institute investigators report that misregulation of two genes, sox2 and lkb1, drives squamous cell lung cancer in mice. The discovery uncovers new treatment strategies, and provides a clinically relevant mouse model in which to test them."


Editor's note: Some tumors have specific genetic mutations that can allow them to be treated with drugs known as targeted therapies. Studying mice with squamous cell lung cancer tumors, scientists have now discovered two new tumor mutations that open up the possibility for new drugs to be developed for humans. The mutations also indicate that some drugs that already exist for other cancers may be used to treat people with squamous cell lung cancer. More investigation is required before the results of these findings might translate to treatments for patients.

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 19, 2014

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Myc-Driven Tumors Could Be Next for Targeted Therapies

Myc-Driven Tumors Could Be Next for Targeted Therapies | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Scientists have made a breakthrough in inhibiting the tumor-driving protein Myc, which previously had been impossible to target with drugs. Myc drives cells toward uncontrolled growth in tumors and is involved in many of the most serious forms of cancer including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, brain cancer, prostate cancer, and blood cancer. Scientists have found that one drug that indirectly targets myc slows tumor growth in a mouse model of myc-driven cancer. The key to the breakthrough was recognizing that myc relies partially on MTOR, another protein, for its protein supply. By targeting MTOR, the drug keeps Myc from promoting tumor growth. The drug, called MLN0128, is already in clinical trials for a variety of cancers, but this is the first time it has been viewed as a tool to treat Myc-driven cancer. The researchers said that other indirect targeted therapy drugs are already being tested in human studies to treat Myc-driven tumors.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Science Daily | Jul 19, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 19, 2013 6:11 PM

Science Daily | Jul 19, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 19, 2013 6:11 PM

Science Daily | Jul 19, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 19, 2013 6:11 PM

Science Daily | Jul 19, 2013