Lung Cancer Dispatch
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Ohio State Partners with MedVax to Bring a Cancer Peptide Vaccine to Patients

Ohio State Partners with MedVax to Bring a Cancer Peptide Vaccine to Patients | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The Ohio State University, through the Ohio State Innovation Foundation, has signed an exclusive world-wide licensing agreement with MedVax Technologies, Inc., for the licensing of groundbreaking cancer peptide vaccine technologies.


"The anticancer vaccine technologies are designed for the treatment and prevention of cancers associated with the HER2 protein. These include breast, ovarian, lung, colon and pancreatic cancers, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The commitment by MedVax will allow innovative clinical trials for various cancers to be conducted in the near future."


Editor's Note: Cancer vaccines are a type of "immune therapy," which means that they boost a patient's immune system to fight cancer. To learn more about immune therapies for lung cancer, read our blog feature on the topic.

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 18, 2014

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Safer, Peptide-Based Therapies Studied as Alternative to Monoclonal Antibodies

Safer, Peptide-Based Therapies Studied as Alternative to Monoclonal Antibodies | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors have been the primary treatment methods for many types of cancer for many years, but new studies may change that. Peptides, proteins made of small chains of 10 to 50 amino acids, are being examined as possible cost-effective, more successful, safer anticancer vaccines. Researchers have identified two regions on the HER1 (also known as the EGFR) protein as possible targets for these peptide-based drugs. These agents could be used in the treatment of lung cancer, breast cancer, colorectal cancer, and head and neck cancers. If successful, the EGFR-targeting peptide vaccines could be combined with immunotherapies for the HER2 and VEGF proteins, possibly reducing the likelihood that the cancer will develop resistance to the treatment, a common pitfall of monoclonal antibody drugs such as cetuximab (Erbitux).

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Medical News Today | Jul 26, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 26, 2013 4:50 PM

Medical News Today | Jul 26, 2013

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FDA to Regulate Personalized Medicine

Now that medical treatment is increasingly tailored to patient subtypes (eg, lung cancer patients with mutations in the ALK gene can be treated with Xalkori), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has released a new report explaining how it will regulate personalized therapies and tests. The first targeted therapy used in the U.S. was trastuzumab, which is for HER2 breast cancer and was approved in 1998. Since then, the FDA has approved more than 100 treatments that target specific genetic abnormalities, including four drugs for cancer subtypes that are identified by companion test kits.

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Medscape│Oct 29, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 1, 2013 3:38 PM

Medscape│Oct 29, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 4, 2013 2:06 PM

Medscape│Oct 29, 2013

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Biomarker-Guided Targeted Therapy Is Becoming a Reality

A massive database study performed recently in France demonstrates that genetic testing of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors for disease-relevant biomarkers is feasible, and indeed already helps guide treatment strategies for patients. France’s National Cancer Institute funds routine assessment of genetic alterations in six genes for NSCLC patients: EGFR, KRAS, ALK, BRAF, HER2, and PI3K. Since April 2012, these genetic analyses have been collected into a database. By now, biomarker assessments have been performed for 10,000 NSCLC patients. Of the patients for whom treatment data was available, over half received therapies guided directly by their biomarker testing profile. For example, over half of patients who were found to have a mutation in the EGFR gene were treated with EGFR inhibitors. As the database continues to grow, researchers recommend that newer biomarkers, like the ROS1 gene, should be added to the analysis. Furthermore, they urge that the availability of clinical trials of biomarker-targeted treatments needs to be increased.

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CancerNetwork | Jun 4, 2013

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