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Team Identifies Novel Biomarker for Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Team Identifies Novel Biomarker for Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A team led by a scientist from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has identified a new biomarker linked to better outcomes of patients with head and neck cancers and non-small cell lung cancer. The work could help scientists develop new diagnostics and therapies and help physicians determine the best long-term treatments for patients with these cancers.


"The findings, which were published this week online ahead of print by the journal Cancer, focus on a protein called Choline phosphate cytidylyltransferase-α CCT-α or CCTα, an 'antigen' that prompts the immune system to produce antibodies against it."

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The Scripps Research Institute  |  Apr 2, 2014

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Breast Cancer Drugs May Also Be Effective Against Some Lung Cancers

Breast Cancer Drugs May Also Be Effective Against Some Lung Cancers | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A class of drugs already in clinical trials for breast and ovarian cancer, so-called PARP inhibitors, may also be effective against some forms of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Around half of all NSCLC tumors have low levels of ERCC1, a protein that helps repair damaged DNA. PARP inhibitors act by blocking a different DNA repair mechanism. This creates a one-two punch that kills the NSCLC tumor cells that are low in ERCC1, while healthy cells remain relatively unharmed. A recent cell culture study showed that PARP inhibitors like olaparib, niraparib, and BMN 673 killed ERCC1-deficient NSCLC cells, but not cells with normal ERCC1 levels.

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Cancer Research UK | Aug 12, 2013

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Phase II Trial Shows Feasibility of Customized Adjuvant Treatment in NSCLC, but Phase III Trial Canceled Due to Unreliability of ERCC1 Readouts

Phase II Trial Shows Feasibility of Customized Adjuvant Treatment in NSCLC, but Phase III Trial Canceled Due to Unreliability of ERCC1 Readouts | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"In the phase II Tailored Postsurgical Therapy in Early-Stage NSCLC (TASTE) trial (IFCT-0801), reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Wislez et al examined the feasibility of customized adjuvant treatment based on EGFR mutation status and expression of ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1), a predictor of cisplatin response, in patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although the trial met its primary endpoint of ≥ 80% of patients being able to start adjuvant chemotherapy within 2 months of surgery, a phase III trial of the customized approach was cancelled due to unreliability of ERCC1 immunohistochemical readouts."


Editor's note: This trial tested whether a particular molecular testing method could be used to decide which lung cancer patients might benefit from chemotherapy after surgery to keep the cancer from returning. While the results of the trial were promising, the third phase of the trial was canceled because of some unreliability of the molecular testing method. Another method called Pervenio, already performs a similar function.

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The ASCO Post  |  Mar 31, 2014

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Biomarker Test Does Not Predict Response to Chemotherapy in Lung Cancer

A test for levels of a protein called ERCC1 does not predict how likely non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients are to benefit from chemotherapy, as was previously believed. NSCLC patients whose cancer can be surgically removed are often treated with chemotherapy after surgery (so-called "adjuvant chemotherapy"). A previous study had suggested that patients with lower levels of ERCC1 were more likely to benefit from such chemotherapy, because higher levels of ERCC1 could counteract the effects of platinum-based chemotherapy drugs like cisplatin (Platinol). However, a follow-up study found no association between ERCC1 test results and chemotherapy benefits. A possible reason is that currently available tests are not selective enough to distinguish the active version of ERCC1 from other versions of ERCC1 or from other proteins.


Research paper: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1214271#t=abstract

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MedPage Today | Mar 20, 2013

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