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Enlisting a Computer to Battle Cancers, One by One

Enlisting a Computer to Battle Cancers, One by One | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Once you decode a tumor’s genome, what’s next? Oncologists hope that IBM’s Watson will help them find drugs for patients’ particular brain cancer mix...


"When Robert B. Darnell was a graduate student in the early 1980s, he spent a year sequencing a tiny fragment of DNA. Now Dr. Darnell is an oncologist and the president of the New York Genome Center, where the DNA-sequencing machines can decode his grad-school fragment in less than a ten-thousandth of a second."

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The New York Times  |  Mar 27, 2014

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The New York Times  |  Mar 27, 2014

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The New York Times  |  Mar 27, 2014

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DNA Shed by Tumors Shows Promise for Non-Invasive Screening and Prognosis

DNA Shed by Tumors Shows Promise for Non-Invasive Screening and Prognosis | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Certain fragments of DNA shed by tumors into the bloodstream can potentially be used to non-invasively screen for early-stage cancers, monitor responses to treatment and help explain why some cancers are resistant to therapies, according to results of an international study led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators.


"Analyzing blood samples from 640 patients with various cancers, the researchers used digital polymerase chain reaction-based technology (a sophisticated method of multiplying and measuring the number DNA molecules) to evaluate how well the DNA fragments predicted the presence of tumors in the patients."

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 6, 2014

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 6, 2014

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 6, 2014

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Personalized Medicine Best Way to Treat Cancer, Study Argues

Personalized Medicine Best Way to Treat Cancer, Study Argues | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Assessing the route to cancer on a case-by-case basis might make more sense than basing a patient's cancer treatment on commonly disrupted genes and pathways, a new study indicates. "This paper argues for the importance of personalized medicine, where we treat each person by looking for the etiology of the disease in patients individually," said the lead author. "The findings have ramifications on how we might best optimize cancer treatments as we enter the era of targeted gene therapy."

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ScienceDaily  |  Feb 24, 2014

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ScienceDaily  |  Feb 24, 2014

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ScienceDaily  |  Feb 24, 2014

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Oncologists Differ Widely on Offering Cancer Gene Testing, Study Finds

Oncologists Differ Widely on Offering Cancer Gene Testing, Study Finds | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Many cancer researchers believe that cutting-edge advances in genomics will pave the way for personalized or "precision" cancer medicine for all patients in the near future. A new study by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, however, suggest that not all doctors are ready to embrace tests that look for hundreds of DNA changes in patients' tumor samples, while others plan to offer this type of cancer gene testing to most of their patients. The findings are published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.


"The wide variation in attitudes was in part determined by physicians' genomic confidence. Physicians who had a lot of confidence in their ability to use and explain genomic findings were more likely to want to prescribe the test and consider using test results when making treatment recommendations. Physicians with lower levels of genomic confidence were more reluctant to offer such testing. These findings are particularly interesting because the survey was carried out at the Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center (DF/BWCC), which has a comprehensive research program that allows all consenting patients to have tumor testing that could find mutations and other DNA changes that drive their cancer. In some cases those genomic tumor profiles can provide targets for specific drugs known to be effective against particular mutations."


Editor's note: Cancer gene testing, or molecular testing, can be a powerful tool to help guide treatment decisions. Learn more about it.

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 24, 2014

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 24, 2014

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Enhancement of Chemotherapy by Prevention of Tumor Cell Repair

"The body naturally tries to repair lesions in the DNA of tumor cells, and thus reduces the efficacy of chemotherapy. Blocking the mechanisms for DNA repair would help to potentiate chemotherapy by reducing the resistance of cells to treatment. A team of scientists has discovered a new drug that inhibits repair: spironolactone, which seems likely to be used in the very short term as an adjuvant to chemotherapy."

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ScienceDaily  |  Feb 20, 2014

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ScienceDaily  |  Feb 20, 2014

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ScienceDaily  |  Feb 20, 2014