Lung Cancer Dispatch
Follow
Find tag "African-American patients"
3.6K views | +1 today
Lung Cancer Dispatch
News for Patients and Physicians
Curated by Cancer Commons
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Long or Ultralong Cigarettes Increase Lung Cancer Risk

Long or Ultralong Cigarettes Increase Lung Cancer Risk | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

Smokers of long or ultralong cigarettes are at greater risk for lung and oral cancer than smokers of regular and king-size cigarettes, a recent study determined. Researchers analyzed urine tests from over 3,500 smokers and found that those who smoked long or ultralong cigarettes had higher levels of tobacco-related carcinogens (cancer-causing substances). Female, black, and older smokers were more likely to smoke long or ultralong cigarettes.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress | Oct 28, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Residential Segregation Associated with Higher Rates of Lung Cancer Death for Black Patients

A recent study revealed that residential segregation is tied to increased rates of death from lung cancer for black U.S. Americans, even after controlling for socioeconomic status and smoking rates. For black patients, rates of death from lung cancer increase with higher levels of racial segregation in their county of residence, while for white patients lung cancer mortality rates are lower in more segregated regions. The study’s authors suggest that public health initiatives aimed at reducing lung cancer deaths should be prioritized in highly segregated areas.


Primary source: http://archsurg.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1558105#qundefined

Cancer Commons's insight:

MedPage Today | Jan 16, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Melanoma Dispatch
Scoop.it!

Cancer Survivors' Lifestyles Put Them at Risk for Heart Disease

Cancer Survivors' Lifestyles Put Them at Risk for Heart Disease | Lung Cancer Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new study suggests that cancer survivors are at greater risk for heart disease, highlighting the need for incorporating lifestyle changes into their continuing care. In a self-reported survey, the researchers found that 1,582 people who had survived cancer (breast, colorectal, gynecologic, or prostate) also had more risk factors for cardiovascular disease including smoking, high body mass index, physical inactivity, hypertension, and diabetes. Hispanic and black survivors had more of these risk factors than white survivors. In addition, nearly one-third of those surveyed said that their health care provider had not suggested reducing their risk of heart disease by, for example, exercising and losing weight.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical News Today│Apr 18, 2013

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 18, 2013 3:15 PM

Medical News Today│Apr 18, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 18, 2013 3:59 PM

Medical News Today│Apr 18, 2013