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Portraits Of NYC Immigrants Reveal Cultural Backgrounds

Portraits Of NYC Immigrants Reveal Cultural Backgrounds | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
Here are just a handful of the 12 million men, women, and children who arrived at Ellis Island, New York, between 1892 and 1954 to start a new life in the USA, often dressed in their finest clothes. The portraits show immigrants wearing the national dress of their country of origin, including military uniforms from Albania, bonnets from the Netherlands, and clothing of Sámi people from the Arctic regions.

The photographs were taken between 1906 and 1914 by amateur photographer Augustus Francis Sherman, the chief registry clerk at Ellis Island, then the country’s busiest immigration station. In 1907 some of the photos were published by National Geographic.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 2, 11:26 AM

These images show some of the diverse cultural backgrounds of turn-of-the-century American immigrants.  The formal clothing that represents the folk cultures that they came from hint at the massive cultural shift that these immigrants must have experienced upon arriving to the United States.  These photos of migrants wearing clothing representing their Old World lives right as they are about to culturally assimilate (or acculturate) into the New World are pictures I find quite poignant and personal.    

 

Tagsculturemigrationhistorical, folk culturesethnicity, unit 3 culture.

16s3d's curator insight, October 21, 2:06 AM
Les couleurs révélées de la diversité des immigrants aux États-Unis entre 1906 et 1914
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All Maps Are Biased. Google Maps’ New Redesign Doesn’t Hide It.

All Maps Are Biased. Google Maps’ New Redesign Doesn’t Hide It. | Love of Geography | Scoop.it

"Google rolled out its new Maps design...from a navigational tool to a commercial interface and offers the clearest proof yet that the geographic web—despite its aspirations to universality—is a deeply subjective entity."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 5, 11:43 AM

Google Maps was updated over the summer, and the updates don't make them more impartial, but that isn't a bad thing.  Google Maps now highlight 'Areas of interest,' which are created with algorithms designed to reveal the “highest concentration of restaurants, bars, and shops.” The algorithms aren't 'objective,' but are fine-tuned by human engineers to reflect what they consider 'Areas of Interests' should look like.  Maps are never as objective as they appear to be, and that can often be a great thing. 

 

Tags: google, mapping, geospatial, cartography, visualization.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, September 6, 9:30 AM
All maps are biased because they are not the territory, but represent our subjective view of the territory; what we include and what we leave out depends on what we deem important, or not. Europe is still oversized in most current maps in relation to the "Third World." What is the new politically correct fad?
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Travel speeds in the U.S. in the 1800s

Travel speeds in the U.S. in the 1800s | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
Maps from the 1932 Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States put travel in the 1800s into perspective.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2015 1:02 PM

unit 1

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 14, 2015 4:05 PM

This series of maps shows the great leaps and bounds that were made during the 19th century in transportation technology in the United States.  This impacted population settlement, economic interactions and functionally made the great distances seem smaller.  This is what many call the time-space compression; the friction of distance is diminished as communication and transportation technologies improve.  


Questions to Ponder: When someone says they live "10 minutes away," what does that say about how we think about distance, transportation infrastructure and time?  How is geography still relevant in a world where distance appears to becoming less of a factor?  

 

Tags: transportation, modelsdiffusion, globalization, diffusion, time-space.

Erik Glitman's curator insight, September 18, 2015 11:39 AM

Comparing how long it took to travel even 150 years ago opens up a question on trust. At that time, checking accounts were rare, credit cards non-existent, and every one had to travel with cash. Yet, incidents of robbery were uncommon and trust in the stranger was high. Now travel takes a small fraction of the time it did 150 years ago and strangers are seen as a threat. Trust has eroded, but is it a fear based or fact based erosion?  Is travel less safe now than it was in the 1860's?

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Cities are the New Nations

Cities are the New Nations | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
“Political geography is not determinant anymore, because cities are more important.”
Kevin Barker's insight:
Cities are the new countries.  This idea is getting a lot of attention as large urban centers are increasingly seen as the real power brokers of the world.
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Total Fertility Rates, 1950 and 2015

Total Fertility Rates, 1950 and 2015 | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
It is quite significant that extremely high fertility figures are now mostly confined to tropical Africa, with only a few exceptions (such as Afghanistan and East Timor).

Via Seth Dixon
Kevin Barker's insight:

In the decades after 1950, less developed countries were characterized as having very high fertility rates and that was (by and large) an accurate statement.  While the highest birth rates are still in less developed economies, it is important to note that the subjective scale is changing; while over 8 was once uncommonly high, now over 5 is as comparably uncommon a fertility rate as 8 used to be.  This still signals global population growth, but the idea that the 'less developed world' hasn't adopted birth control or other measures to slow population growth is outdated.   

 

Tag: declining populations, population, demographics, unit 2 population.

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Jean-Michel Crosnier's curator insight, March 21, 11:25 AM

In the decades after 1950, less developed countries were characterized as having very high fertility rates and that was (by and large) an accurate statement.  While the highest birth rates are still in less developed economies, it is important to note that the subjective scale is changing; while over 8 was once uncommonly high, now over 5 is as comparably uncommon a fertility rate as 8 used to be.  This still signals global population growth, but the idea that the 'less developed world' hasn't adopted birth control or other measures to slow population growth is outdated.   

 

Tag: declining populations, population, demographics, unit 2 population.

Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, March 28, 10:52 AM

In the decades after 1950, less developed countries were characterized as having very high fertility rates and that was (by and large) an accurate statement.  While the highest birth rates are still in less developed economies, it is important to note that the subjective scale is changing; while over 8 was once uncommonly high, now over 5 is as comparably uncommon a fertility rate as 8 used to be.  This still signals global population growth, but the idea that the 'less developed world' hasn't adopted birth control or other measures to slow population growth is outdated.   

 

Tag: declining populations, population, demographics, unit 2 population.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 12:58 PM

In the decades after 1950, less developed countries were characterized as having very high fertility rates and that was (by and large) an accurate statement.  While the highest birth rates are still in less developed economies, it is important to note that the subjective scale is changing; while over 8 was once uncommonly high, now over 5 is as comparably uncommon a fertility rate as 8 used to be.  This still signals global population growth, but the idea that the 'less developed world' hasn't adopted birth control or other measures to slow population growth is outdated.   

 

Tag: declining populations, population, demographics, unit 2 population.

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Introduction to Human Geography: A Disciplinary Approach

Introduction to Human Geography: A Disciplinary Approach | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
This website serves as an off-campus host for text, images, data and other web-based resources associated with the free eText, Introduction to Human Geography: A Disciplinary Approach.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 2015 4:58 PM

I'm very excited to see a free eText in Human Geography.  I will be looking at this more closely during the next semester and think that geography teachers will see this as a welcome supplemental to their arsenal of resources. This is definitely on the shortlist of best materials on this site.   


Tags: geography educationAPHG, textbook.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, August 13, 2015 7:24 AM

Human Geography

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, August 13, 2015 8:52 AM

Gracias a Seth Dixon accedo a este texto de acceso libre que es una interesante Introducción a la Geografía Humana. De fácil navegación se puede acceder a valiosa información textual, a imágenes, datos y otros recursos. Es un producto de Steven Graves, profesor de geografía en California State University, Northridge.

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Interactives about Syrian Refugee Crisis

Interactives about Syrian Refugee Crisis | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
War, sectarian violence, and famine have forced more than 50 million people from their homes—the largest number of displaced people since World War II.

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Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, March 3, 10:40 AM

Here are two excellent ESRI StoryMaps about the Syrian refugee crisis; these are two very good examples of a great web maps. 

 

Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, Syria, political, refugees.

malbert's curator insight, March 4, 1:30 AM

Here are two excellent ESRI StoryMaps about the Syrian refugee crisis; these are two very good examples of a great web maps. 

'The Uprooted' (focused more on Syria).
Epicenter of a Deepening Refugee Crisis (puts Syria into larger global patterns).

 

Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, Syria, political, refugees.

Rachel Stutzman's curator insight, March 11, 10:28 AM

Here are two excellent ESRI StoryMaps about the Syrian refugee crisis; these are two very good examples of a great web maps. 

'The Uprooted' (focused more on Syria).
Epicenter of a Deepening Refugee Crisis (puts Syria into larger global patterns).

 

Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, Syria, political, refugees.

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Geography as a Primary Source

Geography as a Primary Source | Love of Geography | Scoop.it

"A geographic perspective is a way of looking at and understanding our world. When you view the world through the lens of geography, you are asking who, what, where, when, and how people, places, and things are distributed across the surface of the earth, and why/how they got there. In other words, it means that you are analyzing something with a geographic perspective. The understanding and use of a geographic perspective is critical for decision making skills in the 21st century. Using spatial concepts such as location, region, movement, and scale to help us understand:

Interactions - How the world worksInterconnections - How systems in our world are connected Implications - How to make well-reasoned decisions"

---@natgeo, Geography as a Primary Source


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Kevin Barker's insight:

Well thought out visual for how a geographically informed person sees and thinks about the world and what is in it.  Are you asking questions?

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Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, January 27, 3:59 PM

This is a field guide designed by National Geographic to help students strengthen their geographic skills.

Lilydale High School's curator insight, March 23, 5:52 AM

This is a field guide designed by National Geographic to help students strengthen their geographic skills. 

 

Tags: National Geographic, perspective.

is bell's curator insight, March 29, 10:28 PM

This is a field guide designed by National Geographic to help students strengthen their geographic skills. 

 

Tags: National Geographic, perspective.

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Cross-Canada route severed after Northern Ontario bridge splits apart

Cross-Canada route severed after Northern Ontario bridge splits apart | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
A newly constructed bridge in northern Ontario has heaved apart, indefinitely closing the Trans-Canada highway — the only road connecting Eastern and Western Canada. At least one town has declared a state of emergency.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 11, 11:01 AM

One bridge going down isn't noteworthy, but when that functionally separates Canada in two...that IS noteworthy.  A detour into the U.S. and around some Great Lakes is one heckuva detour.   

 

Tags: transportationCanada.

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The Geography of E-Waste

The Geography of E-Waste | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
The world is increasingly going hi-tech. Many people in our high consumption society want the latest and the greatest; last year’s much anticipated laptops and cell phones are miles behind the newest models that are coming out. So what happens with the old models? Even thrift stores are politely not accepting them as donations. Even some workable machines that were highly valuable 10 years ago are now functionally trash in our society. We can’t put it to the curb to end up in the landfill because of the lead, mercury, and other hazardous materials that can leak into the environment. This type of trash is what we call e-waste. The geography of e-waste is an ‘out of sight out of mind’ problem that we rarely think about but need to due to the ecological impacts of our collective consumption.

 

Tags: pollution, sustainability, environment, resources, Ghana, Africa.


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www.cheapassignmenthelp.com's curator insight, November 6, 2015 5:39 AM

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, November 6, 2015 5:22 PM

Areas of proaction and consumption / glean connections between places

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:56 AM

summer work

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Traveling Teaches Students in a Way Schools Can't

Traveling Teaches Students in a Way Schools Can't | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
American education is largely limited to lessons about the West.

 

When I turned 15, my parents sent me alone on a one-month trip to Ecuador, the country where my father was born. This was tradition in our family—for my parents to send their first-generation American kids to the country of their heritage, where we would meet our extended family, immerse ourselves in a different culture, and learn some lessons on gratefulness.

My family’s plan worked. That month in Ecuador did more for my character, education, and sense of identity than any other experience in my early life.

 

Tags: place, tourism, education, geo-inspiration.


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Tony Hall's curator insight, December 3, 2015 11:59 PM

This is a great article. I think it applies to people who live in all developed countries (not just the USA), as well as the privileged people from the less developed places. It touches on a lot of things I care about - seeing, feeling, smelling how other people live. Learning that we are not all the same. Knowing that it is ok to not engage with the "American/Australian/Western Dream". Knowing that it is ok to have your own dreams that are different to other people. 

Tina Little-Coltrane's curator insight, December 4, 2015 9:37 AM

An Absolute #TRUTH !!

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 16, 2015 7:15 PM

Being able to travel is a great gift. There is nothing more rewarding than seeing new places and learning about cultures. Unfortunately, the last time that I could afford to travel far from home was when I was young and I didn't understand the amazing opportunity that I had at the time. I traveled to Aruba, and to New Brunswick, Canada. Both amazing places. If I could go anywhere, I'd go to Germany, London, and Ireland as soon as possible. My great grandmother was from England, and my great grandfather was from Canada, I'd like to visit their home towns. Traveling places would definitely be a better learning experience than leaning about a place in school. You get to experience the real thing. Interact with the locals and maybe even get involved with the local traditions. Traveling to learn is definitely an experience worth wild.

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Watch Europe's Migrant Crisis Escalate in This Animated, Interactive Map - CityLab

Watch Europe's Migrant Crisis Escalate in This Animated, Interactive Map - CityLab | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
A new interactive data viz shows flows of refugees seeking asylum as whizzing dots.
Kevin Barker's insight:

Fascinating interactive visual of migration flows to Europe from surrounding countries during the last few years.   

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The best American wall map: David Imus’ “The Essential Geography of the United States of America”

The best American wall map: David Imus’ “The Essential Geography of the United States of America” | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
American mapmaking’s most prestigious honor is the “Best of Show” award at the annual competition of the Cartography and Geographic Information Society. The five most recent winners were all maps designed by large, well-known institutions: National Geographic (three times), the Central Intelligence Agency Cartography Center, and the U.S. Census Bureau....
Kevin Barker's insight:

What does the map making process look like and what are some faults of that process?  What makes one map better than another?  What happens when someone takes the time to really pour over every question of font, color and position?

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xkcd: Map Age Guide

xkcd: Map Age Guide | Love of Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 30, 2:17 PM

I was riding my bike during Labor Day weekend and chanced upon a yard sale with an old globe going for $4 (of course I bought it and rode home one-handed).  There were some clues that it wasn't a recent globe (The Soviet Union and Yugoslavia still existed and Burkina Faso was labeled Upper Volta and Zimbabwe was listed as Rhodesia). I knew that if I wanted to know what year this globe was produced, I would need this XKCD guide. XKCD is a comic strip that deals with many intellectual issues, but it can also be a wealth of quality scientific information.  This infographic (hi-res) is amazingly useful if you are trying to find the map of an undated map, but the flow chart also is a wealth of global history and moments that 'changed the map.'

 

Tags: XKCD, artinfographic, mapping, trivia, cartography.

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Why Italy’s 'Fertility Day' is backfiring

Why Italy’s 'Fertility Day' is backfiring | Love of Geography | Scoop.it

"Facing a low fertility rate (1.4), Italy is holding its first 'Fertility Day' on Sept. 22, which will emphasize 'the beauty of motherhood and fatherhood' and host roundtable discussions on fertility and reproductive health. That may seem inoffensive, but the country’s health department is trying to raise awareness with an ad campaign that’s striking many as misguided and, worse, sexist and alarmist."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 2, 8:47 AM

This pro-natalist campaign designed by the health ministry has received near universal criticism (in an attempt to see other perspectives, I searched for a more positive or even neutral article on the topic and came up empty-handed).  Italy's Prime Minister openly scoffed at the premise of the campaign, and many pundits argue that it shames and pressures women into thinking about personal choices of childbearing as if they were communal responsibilities.  Unlike the infamous 'Do it For Denmark' advertisements that were filled with playful innuendos, or Singapore's 'Maybe Baby' which highlights the joys of parenthood, this one has more overtones of duty and plays on fear more than those other pro-natalist campaigns.      

 

Tags:  ItalyEurope, declining populations, population, demographic transition model, modelsunit 2 population. 

 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 5, 7:28 AM
Preliminary - population
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The Ugly Story of South Dallas

The Ugly Story of South Dallas | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
A new documentary explores the history of segregation, discriminatory policies, and racially motivated bombings that shaped two neighborhoods.
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This map should change the way you think about foreign aid

This map should change the way you think about foreign aid | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
As you can see, the biggest recipient by a long way is Israel (this is fiscal year 2014 data, but nothing's changing), and two other big ones are Egypt and Jordan, which both have aid packages that are tied up with their peace treaties with Israel. None of these are poor countries (indeed, Israel is downright rich), and the point of the money is to advance an American foreign policy agenda — not to help the poor. Pakistan and Afghanistan, which round out the top five, actually are pretty poor, but, again, the main American interest in them is clearly foreign policy rather than poverty.

 

Tags: political, geopolitics, development, economic.


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lpatteson's curator insight, March 23, 1:01 PM
I wonder what this would look like if it were a map of the US's federal aid to the 50 states.
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Walk Appeal and Public Health

Walk Appeal and Public Health | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
"The core idea of Walk Appeal is that people walk longest and most often in places that entice them, but rarely walk just because they’re told they ought to. Some Walk Appeal factors are measurable, while others are immeasurable, and it has long been clear that Walk Appeal is the best predictor of the viability of neighborhood businesses."

Via Seth Dixon
Kevin Barker's insight:

What is a reasonable distance to walk around town?  Research shows that cities with improved sidewalks, less parking lots, attractive storefronts and other amenities that encourage walking.  If  walking the urban environment is and of itself an experience worth having and makes the person feel like a flâneur, experiencing the city on a deeper level, automotive transport goes down and walking goes up.  Urban infrastructure is more important for most people than distance in deciding whether to get in the car or walk down the street (for distances under 2 miles).   Bottom line: neighborhoods that have an appealing sense of place are more walkable.

 

Tags: urban, place, transportation, planning, urbanism, architecture.

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Jessica Ruddy's curator insight, March 21, 10:58 AM

What is a reasonable distance to walk around town?  Research shows that cities with improved sidewalks, less parking lots, attractive storefronts and other amenities that encourage walking.  If  walking the urban environment is and of itself an experience worth having and makes the person feel like a flâneur, experiencing the city on a deeper level, automotive transport goes down and walking goes up.  Urban infrastructure is more important for most people than distance in deciding whether to get in the car or walk down the street (for distances under 2 miles).   Bottom line: neighborhoods that have an appealing sense of place are more walkable.

 

Tags: urban, place, transportation, planning, urbanism, architecture.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 16, 1:21 AM

The concepts of "liveable streets" and "placemaking" can enhance the liveability of places.

Read about " Eyes on the street" and " broken window theory",  "walkability", "green infrastructure"  and " 20 minute neighbourhoods" and orher strategies to enhance liveability in

 

Geoworld 7 NSW 

10.3 Creating better communities

10..4 Places for people

10.5 Liveable streets 

10.6 Green places and open spaces

Geothink: Attributes of a liveable place;  New transport hierarchy; Planning liveable places

Kristina Lemson's curator insight, April 16, 10:44 PM
Use Google Earth to examine the walkability of Banksia Grove. Can younidentify specific elements that look like they have been included to meet this aim? Conversely, what mitigates against people walking in BG?
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AAG's Interactive Modules

AAG's Interactive Modules | Love of Geography | Scoop.it

"Each module consists of a conceptual framework and case studies. The conceptual framework introduces students to some of the key concepts, theories, and analytical approaches in geography. The conceptual framework provides students with the background they need to think geographically about global issues. The case studies illustrate how geographic concepts, methods, and technologies can be used to investigate and solve problems in different places and countries."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 23, 12:32 PM

These 6 interactive modules from the AAG are an untapped treasure trove of resources; they make geographic methods/content relevant using a wide range of global case studies.  Each of these modules has been aligned with the APHG curriculum and can be adapted to a wide range of applications.  This is definitely on the shortlist of the best resources that I've shared over the years.  


TagsAAG, APHG, edtech.


Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 26, 8:20 AM

Great case studies that can be used to understand and apply the 4 geographic critical thinking concepts in Ontario's Geography curriculum. The geographic critical thinking (the "How" we think) concepts are: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends, Interrelationships and Geographic Perspective.

Dewayne Goad's curator insight, March 9, 9:41 AM

These 6 interactive modules from the AAG are an untapped treasure trove of resources; they make geographic methods/content relevant using a wide range of global case studies.  Each of these modules has been aligned with the APHG curriculum and can be adapted to a wide range of applications.  This is definitely on the shortlist of the best resources that I've shared over the years.  


Tags: AAG, APHG, edtech.


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Living in: Places seeking freedom

Living in: Places seeking freedom | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
Residents from Barcelona, Edinburgh, Nuuk, Montreal and Taipei share what’s it like living in a city that’s fiercely independent.
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Just 62 people control more wealth than half the world's population: study

Just 62 people control more wealth than half the world's population: study | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
An Oxfam study indicates that 62 people, most of them men, now control over half the world’s wealth. According to the report, the group holds the same amount of wealth as the world's poorest 3.6 billion citizens.
Kevin Barker's insight:

Even knowing there is a wealth gap problem, this estimate is shocking.  This statistic exists despite the overall increase in the standard of living for the bottom half.

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Behind Stark Political Divisions, a More Complex Map of Sunnis and Shiites

Behind Stark Political Divisions, a More Complex Map of Sunnis and Shiites | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
The geography of the two main branches of Islam is a key factor in the region’s conflicts.

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The states people really want to move to — and those they don’t

The states people really want to move to — and those they don’t | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
A national trend has reversed.

 

When the U.S. economy slowed during the recession, so did one of the major demographic shifts of the last several decades. For a brief respite, the Northeast and Midwest stopped shedding quite so many residents to the burgeoning Sun Belt. That trend, though — which has big consequences for politics, among other things — has been picking back up.  New census data shows the trend accelerating back to its pre-recession pace.

 

Tags: migration, economic, USA.


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Measuring Race and Ethnicity Across The Decades: 1790—2010 - U.S. Census Bureau

Measuring Race and Ethnicity Across The Decades: 1790—2010 - U.S. Census Bureau | Love of Geography | Scoop.it
Kevin Barker's insight:

An excellent interactive that documents the changing categorization of American race over the years as determined by the Census Bureau.

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Is Cultural Appropriation Always Wrong?

Is Cultural Appropriation Always Wrong? | Love of Geography | Scoop.it

We sometimes describe this mingling as 'cross-pollination’ or ‘cross-fertilization’ — benign, bucolic metaphors that obscure the force of these encounters. When we wish to speak more plainly, we talk of ‘appropriation’ — a word now associated with the white Western world’s co-opting of minority cultures.


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asli telli's curator insight, October 15, 2015 1:39 AM

How about "cross-polination" and "cross-fertilization" in cultures?

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 22, 2015 10:32 AM

unit 3

Sarah Nobles's curator insight, November 27, 2015 7:59 AM

Unit 3