Love n Sex n Whatnot
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Love n Sex n Whatnot
Kinda just what the title says...
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The Steam-Powered Vibrator and Other Terrifying Early Sex Machines NSFW

The Steam-Powered Vibrator and Other Terrifying Early Sex Machines NSFW | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
As long as humans have had genitals, we've found artificial ways to stimulate them. But it took the repressed Victorian era to create the vibrator, a device aimed at curing a disease that doesn't exist.
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'Spy-brator' sex toy set to pry on women's intimate moments and RECORD orgasms

'Spy-brator' sex toy set to pry on women's intimate moments and RECORD orgasms | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
British firm prepares for release of the world's most advanced 'pleasure device', which will come with bonkbusting surveillance capabilities

British firm prepares for release of the world's most advanced 'pleasure device', which will come with bonkbusting surveillance capabilities

 
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Photographer Discovers More Than 1,000 Snapshots of 1980s Stripteasers in Los Angeles Garage - Feature Shoot

Photographer Discovers More Than 1,000 Snapshots of 1980s Stripteasers in Los Angeles Garage - Feature Shoot | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
Los Angeles-based director and photographer Tyler Hubby knows the enigmatical B. Mason only from a single box of negatives the latter left behind more than 30 years ago in a house in Echo Park.
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Underground sado-masochistic sex club found beneath historic Louisville building

Underground sado-masochistic sex club found beneath historic Louisville building | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
“Unnerving oil paintings and a decrepit bondage bed with a rusted chain pulled by a handle at one end give hints to what may have been a sado-masochistic swingers club of years past.”
Via Darla Darling, Gracie Passette
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Morrissey List of the Lost sex scene: It raises profound questions.

Morrissey List of the Lost sex scene: It raises profound questions. | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
Morrissey’s first novel, List of the Lost, about a men’s relay track team in 1970s Boston, is out in a retro Penguin edition today in the U.K. and is already No. 1 in “Gothic Romance” on Amazon.
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Invitation to All Paranormal Romance Authors

Invitation to All Paranormal Romance Authors | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
On Wednesdays, Shonda will publish a paranormal author’s profile that includes a bio, a synopsis of their book and links back to their website or blog and social media accounts.

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Shonda Brock's curator insight, September 1, 2015 1:09 PM

To schedule your author interview, send and email to admin at shondabrock.com.

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Happy Ever After: 100 Swoon-Worthy Romances

Happy Ever After: 100 Swoon-Worthy Romances | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
It's the NPR Books Summer of Love, so to celebrate, we asked our readers to nominate their favorite romances. And the results are in: 100 love stories to help every reader find a happy ever after.
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Katie Barber's curator insight, August 24, 2015 2:39 PM

Read this with a glass of wine.

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Is Bitcoin the future of sex work?

Is Bitcoin the future of sex work? | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
Sex workers can no longer use credit cards to place their Backpage ads. Is Bitcoin ready for the rush?
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Senior citizen strippers: Burlesque beauties decked out and working it for the camera

Senior citizen strippers: Burlesque beauties decked out and working it for the camera | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
La Savona, Indianapolis, Indiana (2012)
 
Last week the death of burlesque legend Blaze Starr reminded us all of a far cheekier era of stripper—an anachronistic kind of T and A, with a little more glam and giggle to it than today’s Las Vegas-style bottle service strip clubs. It’s easy to crystallize someone like Starr in our memory as a young bombshell, taking it all off for roaring crowds, scandalizing politics with the Governor of Louisiana (and probably JFK, too), but we should always remember—there is life after pasties! For her book Legends The Living Art Of Risque, French photographer Marie Baronnet captures the fabulous ladies of mid-century burlesque in all their mature glory.

Although I do appreciate Miss Toni Elling and her “hey, fuck it, I’m old” ensemble, the majority of the women featured remain gloriously glam, with sparkles, feathers and cheesecake pouts. There are some ladies who actually took it all off for Baronnet, but in the spirit of the vintage striptease, I’ve kept the selections pretty safe for work. Mostly it seems to be about muscle memory; there is a kind of sexual performance that these women still know how to work...
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What is sex, anyway?

What is sex, anyway? | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
The answer, however, is less simple than you might think.

Sex, as an activity, turns out to be a slippery thing, by which I mean it’s troublingly hard to define. To some extent we all know what we’re talking about when we talking about “having sex”, but there’s room for disagreement. The edges of “sex” seem…porous.

Which can be a problem. There are a number of reasons why we might want to define sex; most pressing of which is that we need to have more conversations about it. We need to do that because quite a lot of people seem to be having bad sex. Bad sex in this context is sex that is not consensual, sex that is not pleasurable or sex that is not safe. Sex that is, in summary, the opposite of awesome. If people want to have sex at all, they should be able to have awesome sex.

It seems not unreasonable to suggest that the awesomeness of sex will increase the more openly we can discuss it, but in order to talk about something, we kind of need to agree what we’re talking about. Otherwise our

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Sex workers just want you to understand that:

Sex workers just want you to understand that: | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
ithotyouknew:
“1. We do this for money, not liberation or empowerment or anything else. Money.
2. We deserve rights and protection just like any other worker.
3. You hurt both victims and consensual...

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Gracie Passette's curator insight, May 25, 2015 3:52 AM

There are some who would take exception to #1...

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I've Been a Prostitute for Almost Ten Years, And I Wish I'd Never Started It

I've Been a Prostitute for Almost Ten Years, And I Wish I'd Never Started It | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
I am embarrassed to be a sex worker, even though I like my job, I’m good at it, and I’ve made exceptional progress in my career over the past few years.

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The Horrifying Reason Women Are Buying Plan B for One Another 

The Horrifying Reason Women Are Buying Plan B for One Another  | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
You guys are the real heroes.

You guys are the real heroes.

 

Via Deanna Dahlsad, Gracie Passette
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What The Wild World Of Vintage Erotica Can Teach Us About Today's Porn (NSFW)

What The Wild World Of Vintage Erotica Can Teach Us About Today's Porn (NSFW) | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
Yes, we're talking about your grandparent's naughty secrets, because porn was just as multifaceted in the 16th century as it is in 2016
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Dig these awesome ‘gay pulp’ paperback covers from the 1970s

Dig these awesome ‘gay pulp’ paperback covers from the 1970s | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
 
I stumbled upon these fantastic covers of “gay pulp” paperbacks from the 1970s the other day and immediately became entranced with them. I saw a few of them at the blog Knee-Deep in the Flooded Victory and immediately knew I had to find out more. It turns out that these covers date from 1974 and 1975; they are from the “RAM-10” series from Hamilton House, a company about which I have no information.

It may not be apparent how unusually striking these covers are—for a nice gallery of more standard-issue gay paperback covers, you could do a lot worse than this post I did for DM a couple of years ago. You’ll see that the more usual style of gay pulp covers relies on well-nigh abstract juxtapositions of male silhouettes and that male/Mars symbol in garish colors. Not so for the RAM-10 series, which uses documentary-style photographic portraits of males dressed up as gay archetypes in front of a field of light blue or blood red, while a vertical line pierces the book’s title and author in a stately serif font. Actually, the covers remind me a bit of Gay Semiotics, the brilliantly deadpan monograph that photographer...
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Denver jury awards $3.9M to former stripper who sued wealthy rancher

Denver jury awards $3.9M to former stripper who sued wealthy rancher | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
“The judge presiding over the civil trial called the attack "indescribably brutal," but in 2013 Denver District Attorney Mitch Morrissey chose to drop the original criminal charge to misdemeanor unlawful contact instead of felony sexual assault.The victim, Amanda Wilson, and her attorney, Qusair Mohamedbhai, told The Denver Post the verdict announced late last week was a victory for other sexual assault victims. And they criticized the district attorney's office for failing to prosecute her attacker on more serious charges for the February 2013 attack."I hope this verdict is empowering to any woman or person who has felt helpless and terrified at the hands of another," Wilson, 30, wrote in an e-mail to The Post. "Rape destroys lives and it does matter, even when the criminal justice system brushes you off and prefers you to be quiet. You do matter."The case is unusual for many reasons, including its large verdict and because a jury took the word of a former exotic dancer over that of a respected businessman who had lavished her with gifts, money and a job, court observers said.”
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In this remote village, some boys don’t grow a penis until they’re 12

In this remote village, some boys don’t grow a penis until they’re 12 | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
Puberty can be an awkward time for anybody, but spare a thought for the Guevedoce children of the Dominican Republic, who literally appear to change their sex when they hit adolescence. As covered by Michael Mosley in the new BBC series, Countdown...
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How A Surrealist Photographer Used Art To Explore His Sexual Identity

How A Surrealist Photographer Used Art To Explore His Sexual Identity | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
Warning: We're serious. It gets (gloriously) dirty down there. At the age of 50, well before his death in 1976, French photographer Pierre Molinier fashioned himself an imaginary grave. It read: "Here
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'Possessing The Lily' And Other Sexual Euphemisms You Never Knew You Needed

'Possessing The Lily' And Other Sexual Euphemisms You Never Knew You Needed | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
Why can't we just say ... *whisper* penis and vagina?
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5 Secrets I Know About Women (From Writing Their Weird Porn)

5 Secrets I Know About Women (From Writing Their Weird Porn) | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
We talked to one of the guys who cranks out erotic fiction by the truckload for sale on Amazon, making a nice living in the process. This is what we learned.
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The Nu Project

The Nu Project | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
The Nu Project is a collection of nude photographs. The premise is simple: anyone over 21 with a body and a space to shoot can volunteer.
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Why romance novelists are the rock stars of the literary world

Why romance novelists are the rock stars of the literary world | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
When American filmmaker Laurie Kahn set out to make Love Between the Covers, a documentary about the women who read and write romance novels, she was struck by how often she heard the same story. It wasn’t a tale of beefy bodice rippers or love at first sight; it was a story about snobs. “I can’t tell you how many people I interviewed,” says Kahn, “who told me that people will walk up to them on a beach and say, ‘Why do you read that trash?’ ” Apparently, where lovers of romance novels go, contempt follows. Sometimes it’s subtle contempt—a raised eyebrow from a colleague, or a snarky comment from a friend (usually the kind of person who claims to read Harper’s on a beach vacation). Other times it’s more overt, even potentially damaging. When Mary Bly (pen name Eloisa James), an academic and New York Times bestselling author, began writing romance, she was advised to keep her fiction writing secret or risk not making tenure at the university where she worked.

For some reason, argues Kahn, perhaps because its subjects are female, romance novels are perceived as fundamentally silly, when other popular “genre fiction”—namely, fiction by and for men—is not. “Nobody,” she says, would walk up to “a man reading Stephen King, or a mystery or sci-fi novel” and scoff. And she’s right: Stephen King may write circles around romance novelist Nora Roberts, but mystery-thriller buffs James Patterson and Dean Koontz most certainly do not. Yet Roberts is the butt of jokes—a universal default example of “bad writing,” while her equally schlocky male contemporaries get a free pass.

A filmmaker whose previous work includes the Emmy-winning documentary A Midwife’s Tale, and Tupperware!, a film about American women of the 1950s who made small fortunes throwing Tupperware parties, Kahn wanted to explore not only the double standard faced by romance authors, but the wild success and collaborative nature of the romance community itself. Love Between the Covers, which premieres at Toronto’s Hot Docs festival at the end of the month, explores life from the perspective of the genre’s giants and veterans—the Nora Robertses and Beverly Jenkinses of the field (the latter a pioneer of African-American romance writing)—and its millions of readers and aspiring writers, some of whom work full-time jobs, yet write more than a thousand words every evening. (When Lenora Barot, pen name Radclyffe, began writing what would become groundbreaking lesbian romance fiction in the ’90s, she was a full-time plastic surgeon.) “It’s these untold stories of women that really appeal to me,” says Kahn. “Here is this community that is huge. It’s a multi-billion-dollar business and the women in it are writing a huge range of romantic fiction and no one gives them the time of day.”

The amazing thing is that this historically derided genre is not only wildly successful (it regularly outsells both mystery and sci-fi; Romance Writers of America estimates the genre made $1.08 billion in sales in 2013) but also preternaturally friendly.

In an age where women are constantly encouraged to “lean in” at predominantly male workspaces, there exists this frequently ignored, yet massive and diverse, woman-steered industry where writers literally tutor their competition. As Bly says early on in Kahn’s film, the romance industry may be one of the last meritocracies left on the planet.

And it’s a very functional one. The annual Romance Writers of America conference, where thousands of authors offer detailed advice to newbie writers on everything from where to pitch to how to find an agent, is unique in a publishing world in which authors are typically discouraged from discussing their contracts openly. Kahn attributes this friendly, inclusive atmosphere, in part, to the recent popularity and acceptance of self-publishing (formerly known as “vanity publishing”).

A common criticism expressed about major romance publisher Harlequin (which declined to comment for this story) is that it promotes the “line”—the type of romance novel, be it “historical” or “intrigue” or other—over the author. Apparently this has been an issue for a long time. “Because of this practice, romance authors have to hustle their own books and find their own markets,”writes Leslie W. Rabine in her 1985 essay, “Romance in the Age of Electronics: Harlequin Enterprises.” They can also have a difficult time getting royalties from publishers, they report, with waits of up to two years, Rabine adds. Today, many romance authors have turned that liability into a strength. If they’re going to do the hustle on their own, many writers figure, why not reap the bulk of the financial reward? Ironically, the entity that’s allowed them to do this is the biggest publishing behemoth of them all—Amazon. Kahn says that, in the three to four years in which she worked on the film, “There’s been a revolution in publishing, and it has upended everything. It used to be that the power was completely in the hands of the publishers, and authors were like hitchhikers waiting by the side of the road, hoping some agent would pick them up,” Kahn says. “When I was shooting, Amazon started Kindle Direct Publishing. That radically changed the picture.”

Shelley Bates (pen names include Shelley Adina and Adina Senft), who writes steampunk and Amish romance fiction, was once one of those metaphorical hitchhikers waiting for an agent to pick up her new book series, Magnificent Devices, set, according to her website, “in an [alternative] Victorian age where steam-powered devices are capable of sending the adventurous to another city, another continent, or even another world.” Bates grew up on Vancouver Island, and today lives near San Francisco with her husband, where, in addition to writing fiction, she rescues chickens (some of them abandoned, others coming to her from people moving out of the area who “can’t take their birds with them”). She shopped her series around to 10 different publishers in 2010, all of which rejected her. She says the editorial department at a major U.K. publisher was really interested at one point, but eventually turned Magnificent Devices down because it wasn’t sure how to market steampunk.


Photograph by Erik Putz

“I put it out myself [on Amazon] in 2011,” says Bates, “and, eight books later, it’s going up like gangbusters. That’s what paid for the house.” Bates, who hired a graphic designer for the cover and marketed the book herself, says she made “six figures” in 2013, and again in 2014, success she attributes to self-publishing and the collaborative nature of her business model. “Suddenly I realized I could go directly to my readers. I bounced things off them on my blog,” she says. “It’s not writing by committee, but my readers are so invested. I’ll give them two cover options [for a book] and they’ll come back and tell me and that will be the cover.”

Romance writers may get little respect from the literary world, but they are, without a doubt, its rock stars. “We don’t really care what the establishment thinks, because we’re paying off our houses,” says Bates. “Readers vote with their wallets. I think the big-publisher business models will have to become more author-friendly if they want to retain their authors.”

Or perhaps they’ll have to embrace diversity. The notion that steampunk, for example, wouldn’t sell, or would be too difficult to market, is a sensibility at odds with other forms of popular entertainment—from television to Hollywood movies—where many producers have realized that diverse ideas and new voices do well in the mainstream. Because publishers sell books to retailers, as opposed to readers themselves, they have an often confused perception of what readers want and who reads what. This is a frustration Barot, who also publishes LGBT books, knows well. She says she’s seen some of her own books placed in the “cultural studies” section of major bookstores—the likely assumption on the part of retailers being that LGBT romance is too niche for general fiction. In other words, if you’re a run-of-the-mill heterosexual romance novel, you’re the subject of cheap ridicule, and if you’re an LGBT romance novel, you’re perceived as irrelevant outside the realm of esoteric academic study.

In the end, the most common assumption about romance novels, buoyed by the success of Fifty Shades of Grey, is that they are anti-feminist. And though the so-called bodice rippers of the 1970s (in which men who look like Fabio ravish passive sweethearts) are still quite popular, the genre has also expanded rapidly in recent years to include fiction of the paranormal, gay, evangelical, steampunk, time travel and Gothic variety (and many more). Its female leads, in many contexts, have evolved with the times, rendering the charge that romance novels are full of oppressed, unthinking women, or who are profoundly ignorant. Not only is the industry itself rife with female entrepreneurs; its heroines always get what they want. In fact, the only formula that rings true across all romance novels is the HEA: the Happily Ever After. It is unanimously believed to be the defining principle of the genre. “The women always win,” says Kahn. “And that doesn’t happen in most places.”

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Annie Edmonds 's curator insight, May 29, 2015 7:08 PM

This isn't new news. Romance novels, and erotic romance novels have been big business for decades. 

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The Women Behind Erotic Fiction

The Women Behind Erotic Fiction | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it
Warning: The captions of this post are excerpts from the featured writers' erotic literature and contain sexually explicit language.  Who are the people behind erotic fiction, those accounts of racy affairs and clandestine romances so often stashed away in secret, read in the privacy of one’s home?

Via Deanna Dahlsad
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Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, May 21, 2015 7:02 PM

Quote: “Easy to imagine they would be foxy, leather-clad mistresses, whip in one hand, the other on the keyboard. I knew the reality would be very different. I wanted to see behind their pseudonyms and secret lives,” Woolfall said in a statement.


Why even begin with the nasty stereotype? Do men get that wrap?

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Meet the UK’s best-paid sex worker who's campaigning to rid prostitution of its stigma

Meet the UK’s best-paid sex worker who's campaigning to rid prostitution of its stigma | Love n Sex n Whatnot | Scoop.it

Josh said there’s a negative attitude towards sex workers. He is now campaigning for the stigma attached to the industry to end. For him, being an escort is just like any regular job.

 

“It’s the most practiced since the dawn of man so I don’t understand why people have to make such a big deal of it like it’s some sacred cow.

 

“The only other job you can be in and learn so much about people is being a psychologist.”


Via Gracie Passette
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