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Break Out of that Writing Rut: Tell-Don't Show-and Write More of What You Love! via PHILOSBOOKS

Break Out of that Writing Rut: Tell-Don't Show-and Write More of What You Love!  via PHILOSBOOKS | Love | Scoop.it

Writing is hard work. You are faced with a blank sheet of paper. Don't let this stop you.


Via Penelope
♥ princess leia ♥'s insight:

Writing is love

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Penelope's comment, April 2, 2014 8:23 PM
Thanks for stopping by my little corner of the world, Mick!
Mick D Kirkov's comment, April 3, 2014 12:14 AM
Perhaps love, as you wrote and they sing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mGIfE9uhxSE - will port you out of the sick mood. As to my "stopping", old love doesn't rust, explains.
Ali Anani's curator insight, April 30, 2014 2:11 AM

love writing what you love

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How a planet could survive a collision between its two suns

How a planet could survive a collision between its two suns | Love | Scoop.it

The discovery of transiting circumbinary planets by the Kepler mission suggests that planets can form efficiently around binary stars. None of the stellar binaries currently known to host planets has a period shorter than 7 d, despite the large number of eclipsing binaries found in the Kepler target list with periods shorter than a few days. These compact binaries are believed to have evolved from wider orbits into their current configurations via the so-called Lidov–Kozai migration mechanism, in which gravitational perturbations from a distant tertiary companion induce large-amplitude eccentricity oscillations in the binary, followed by orbital decay and circularization due to tidal dissipation in the stars.


While searching for Earth-like planets, NASA’s Kepler spacecraft has come across 10 that share one very un-Earth-like quality: They orbit two stars, instead of one. The worlds are aptly named “circumbinary planets” (“circum” meaning around, and “binary” referring to two objects), and in this type of binary system, the two stars orbit each other while the planet orbits the two stars (pictured above). But only the lucky binaries seem to have planets that orbit them; some stellar binaries that lack orbiting bodies have a different third party—a distant star that’s so massive, its gravitational fluxes actually change the orbit of the stellar binary, causing the two stars to shrink together in a process called orbital decay. If left uninterrupted, the stars will eventually collide together in a violent, calamitous explosion. Now, astronomers have asked a new question: What would happen if a circumbinary planet were in the mix? Naturally, one assumes its inevitable, fiery demise. But findings, published online 9 July in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reveal that may not be the case.


Using a combination of theoretical and numerical formulas, astronomers calculated that the planet may actually be able to survive the blast. The difference between life and death depends on that third, distant body. The researchers mathematically showed that the same mechanism that forces the binary together shifts the alignment of the circumbinary planet, potentially allowing it to sneak far enough away to escape incineration. Even so, surviving without a home base is a bit of a lonely swap.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Nanowires give 'solar fuel cell' efficiency a tenfold boost

Nanowires give 'solar fuel cell' efficiency a tenfold boost | Love | Scoop.it

Researchers make important step towards a solar cell that generates hydrogen.


Researchers have developed a very promising prototype of a new solar celll. The material gallium phosphide enables their solar cell to produce the clean fuel hydrogen gas from liquid water. Processing the gallium phosphide in the form of very small nanowires is novel and helps to boost the yield by a factor of ten. And does so using ten thousand times less precious material.


According to Bakkers, it's not simply about the yield -- where there is still a lot of scope for improvement he points out: "For the nanowires we needed ten thousand less precious GaP material than in cells with a flat surface. That makes these kinds of cells potentially a great deal cheaper," Bakkers says. "In addition, GaP is also able to extract oxygen from the water -- so you then actually have a fuel cell in which you can temporarily store your solar energy. In short, for a solar fuels future we cannot ignore gallium phosphide any longer."


GaP has good electrical properties but the drawback that it cannot easily absorb light when it is a large flat surface as used in GaP solar cells. The researchers have overcome this problem by making a grid of very small GaP nanowires, measuring five hundred nanometers (a millionth of a millimeter) long and ninety nanometers thick. This immediately boosted the yield of hydrogen by a factor of ten to 2.9 percent. A record for GaP cells, even though this is still some way off the fifteen percent achieved by silicon cells coupled to a battery.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Solar fuels: how planes and cars could be powered by the sun

Solar fuels: how planes and cars could be powered by the sun | Love | Scoop.it
Rooftop solar power is exploding in the US but some scientists are pursuing a radically different route in renewable energy: storing solar energy as a liquid fuel.

Via Norman Warthmann
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Quantum Physics NOVA Discovery Science History Universe full documentary

Universe,universe documentary,universe documentary 2015,documentary national geographic animals,documentary national geographic 2015,documentary ...
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Cancer On The Rise Globally: 15 Million Cancer Cases Diagnosed in 2013

Cancer On The Rise Globally: 15 Million Cancer Cases Diagnosed in 2013 | Love | Scoop.it

The number of new cases of cancer in the world is rising, according to a new report that looked at cancer in 118 countries. Globally, the number of new cancer cases increased from 8.5 million in 1990 to 14.9 million in 2013, the study found. The world population rose from 5.3 billion to 7.1 billion during that time. In addition, cancer is accounting for an increasingly greater proportion of deaths: In 1990, 12 percent of all deaths in the countries studied were due to cancer, but in 2013, it was 15 percent.


The researchers specifically looked at 28 different types of cancer, and found that cases from nearly all of these types of cancer have increased in the last two decades — ranging from a 9 percent increase in cervical cancer cases to a 217 percent increase in prostate cancer cases. The only cancer that decreased during the study period was Hodgkin's lymphoma, which saw a 10 percent decrease in the number of new cases between 1990 and 2013.


The overall rise in cancer cases is partly due to longer life spans, since the risk of cancer increases with age. "With life expectancy increasing globally, the future burden of cancer will likely increase," the researchers said. The growing global population, increases in obesity and poor dietary habits also have contributed to the rise, they said.


Cancer is more common in men than in women, with 1 in 3 men worldwide developing cancer before age 79, compared with 1 in 5 women. The most common cancer overall was cancer of the lungs, trachea or bronchus, with 1.8 million new cases and 1.6 million deaths in 2013, followed by breast cancer and colon cancer. The most common cancer in men was prostate cancer, and the most common cancer in women was breast cancer.


A particularly concerning trend is an increase in cancer cases in developing countries, the researchers said. In 2013, the rates of new cancer cases were higher in developing countries than in developed countries for stomach cancer, liver cancer, esophageal cancer, cervical cancer, mouth cancer, and nose and throat cancer.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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#Alzheimer's Origins Tied to Rise of Human Intelligence #science

#Alzheimer's Origins Tied to Rise of Human Intelligence #science | Love | Scoop.it
Factors that drove the evolution of our intellectual capacity are also implicated in the memory disorder

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Hidden Magnetic Portals Around Earth - #science

A NASA-sponsored researcher at the University of Iowa has developed a way for spacecraft to hunt down hidden magnetic portals in the vicinity of Earth. These...

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India doctors' leave canceled as heat wave kills 1,100

India doctors' leave canceled as heat wave kills 1,100 | Love | Scoop.it
NEW DELHI (Reuters) - A heat wave in India has killed more than 1,100 people this week as temperatures soar above 47 Celsius (116.6 Fahrenheit), and doctors' leave has been canceled to help cope with the

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Chevron defends environmental record in Ecuador, sees bright future for Richmond refinery

Chevron defends environmental record in Ecuador, sees bright future for Richmond refinery | Love | Scoop.it
Chevron warded off a litany of accusations of environmental damage and corporate malfeasance during its annual meeting Wednesday, and after the event the company said the Richmond refinery will remain a major part of its operations.

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Climate change could shrink Mount Everest’s glaciers by 70 percent, study finds

Climate change could shrink Mount Everest’s glaciers by 70 percent, study finds | Love | Scoop.it
By 2100, a new study finds, the iconic glaciers could be mostly gone.

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Scientists are using #herpes to treat skin #cancer — and it’s working #science #medicine #doctor

Scientists are using #herpes to treat skin #cancer — and it’s working #science #medicine #doctor | Love | Scoop.it
The modified virus attacks cancer cells while calling the immune system in for back-up.

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Reclassify psychedelic #drugs so we can properly research them, says a leading #psychiatrist

Reclassify psychedelic #drugs so we can properly research them, says a leading #psychiatrist | Love | Scoop.it
Psychedelic drugs including LSD and magic mushrooms are much less harmful than has been claimed, and should be reclassified to make it easier for scientists to research their potential benefits, a leading psychiatrist has said.

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Driest place on Earth hosts life

Driest place on Earth hosts life | Love | Scoop.it
Researchers have pinpointed the driest location on Earth in the Atacama Desert, a region in Chile already recognised as the most arid in the world. They have also found evidence of life at the site, a discovery that could have far-reaching implications for the search for life on Mars.

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Development of smart clothes for personalized cooling and heating

Development of smart clothes for personalized cooling and heating | Love | Scoop.it

Instead of heating or cooling your whole house, imagine a fabric that will keep your body at a comfortable temperature — regardless of how hot or cold it actually is. That’s the goal of an engineering project called ATTACH (Adaptive Textiles Technology with Active Cooling and Heating) at the University of California, San Diego, funded with a $2.6M grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPA-E).


By regulating the temperature around an individual person, rather than a large room, the smart fabric could potentially cut the energy use of buildings and homes by at least 15 percent, said project leader Joseph Wang, distinguished professor of nanoengineering at UC San Diego.


“In cases where there are only one or two people in a large room, it’s not cost-effective to heat or cool the entire room,” said Wang. “If you can do it locally, like you can in a car by heating just the car seat instead of the entire car, you can save a lot of energy.”


The smart fabric will be designed to regulate the temperature of the wearer’s skin — keeping it at 93° F — by adapting to temperature changes in the room. When the room gets cooler, the fabric will become thicker. When the room gets hotter, the fabric will become thinner, using polymers inside the smart fabric that expand in the cold and shrink in the heat.


“93° F is the average comfortable skin temperature for most people,” added Renkun Chen, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at UC San Diego, and one of the collaborators on this project.


The clothing will incorporate printable “thermoelectrics” into specific spots of the smart fabric to regulate the temperature on “hot spots” — such as areas on the back and underneath the feet — that tend to get hotter than other parts of the body when a person is active.


“With the smart fabric, you won’t need to heat the room as much in the winter, and you won’t need to cool the room down as much in the summer. That means less energy is consumed,” said Chen.


The researchers are also designing the smart fabric to power itself, using rechargeable batteries to power the thermoelectrics and biofuel cells that can harvest electrical power from human sweat.


The 3-D printable wearable parts will be thin, stretchable, and flexible to ensure that the smart fabric is not bulky or heavy. The material will also be washable, stretchable, bendable and lightweight. “We also hope to make it look attractive and fashionable to wear,” said Wang.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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A World Without Work

A World Without Work | Love | Scoop.it
For centuries, experts have predicted that machines would make workers obsolete. That moment may finally be arriving. Could that be a good thing?

Via Norman Warthmann
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Expanding the DNA alphabet: ‘extra’ DNA base (5-formylcytosine) found to be stable in mammals

Expanding the DNA alphabet: ‘extra’ DNA base (5-formylcytosine) found to be stable in mammals | Love | Scoop.it
A rare DNA base, previously thought to be a temporary modification, has been shown to be stable in mammalian DNA, suggesting that it plays a key role in cellular function.

 

Researchers from the University of Cambridge and the Babraham Institute have found that a naturally occurring modified DNA base appears to be stably incorporated in the DNA of many mammalian tissues, possibly representing an expansion of the functional DNA alphabet.


The new study, published in the journal Nature Chemical Biology, has found that this rare ‘extra’ base, known as 5-formylcytosine (5fC) is stable in living mouse tissues. While its exact function is yet to be determined, 5fC’s physical position in the genome makes it likely that it plays a key role in gene activity.


“This modification to DNA is found in very specific positions in the genome – the places which regulate genes,” said the paper’s lead author Dr Martin Bachman, who conducted the research while at Cambridge’s Department of Chemistry. “In addition, it’s been found in every tissue in the body – albeit in very low levels.”


“If 5fC is present in the DNA of all tissues, it is probably there for a reason,” said Professor Shankar Balasubramanian of the Department of Chemistry and the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, who led the research. “It had been thought this modification was solely a short-lived intermediate, but the fact that we’ve demonstrated it can be stable in living tissue shows that it could regulate gene expression and potentially signal other events in cells.”


Since the structure of DNA was discovered more than 60 years ago, it’s been known that there are four DNA bases: G, C, A and T (Guanine, Cytosine, Adenine and Thymine). The way these bases are ordered determines the makeup of the genome. In addition to G, C, A and T, there are also small chemical modifications, or epigenetic marks, which affect how the DNA sequence is interpreted and control how certain genes are switched on or off. The study of these marks and how they affect gene activity is known as epigenetics.


5fC is one of these marks, and is formed when enzymes called TET enzymes add oxygen to methylated DNA – a DNA molecule with smaller molecules of methyl attached to the cytosine base. First discovered in 2011, it had been thought that 5fC was a ‘transitional’ state of the cytosine base which was then being removed from DNA by dedicated repair enzymes. However, this new research has found that 5fC can actually be stable in living tissue, making it likely that it plays a key role in the genome.


Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, the researchers examined levels of 5fC in living adult and embryonic mouse tissues, as well as in mouse embryonic stem cells – the body’s master cells which can become almost any cell type in the body.


They found that 5fC is present in all tissues, but is very rare, making it difficult to detect. Even in the brain, where it is most common, 5fC is only present at around 10 parts per million or less. In other tissues throughout the body, it is present at between one and five parts per million.


The researchers applied a method consisting of feeding cells and living mice with an amino acid called L-methionine, enriched for naturally occurring stable isotopes of carbon and hydrogen, and measuring the uptake of these isotopes to 5fC in DNA. The lack of uptake in the non-dividing adult brain tissue pointed to the fact that 5fC can be a stable modification: if it was a transient molecule, this uptake of isotopes would be high.


The researchers believe that 5fC might alter the way DNA is recognised by proteins. “Unmodified DNA interacts with a specific set of proteins, and the presence of 5fC could change these interactions either directly or indirectly by changing the shape of the DNA duplex,” said Bachman. “A different shape means that a DNA molecule could then attract different proteins and transcription factors, which could in turn change the way that genes are expressed.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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World's largest telescope to reveal dawn of universe - CNN.com

World's largest telescope to reveal dawn of universe - CNN.com | Love | Scoop.it
The Giant Magellan Telescope will be the largest telescope ever built on Earth and it will provide a window into the beginnings of our universe.
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Why privacy matters

Why privacy matters | Love | Scoop.it
Glenn Greenwald was one of the first reporters to see -- and write about -- the Edward Snowden files, with their revelations about the United States' extensive surveillance of private citizens.

Via Aurora Humarán
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Decoding The Universe | The Great Math Mystery | BBC #Science Documentary

Decoding The Universe | The Great Math Mystery | BBC Science Documentary.

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Canada wildfires rage on, intensify near oil sands sites

Canada wildfires rage on, intensify near oil sands sites | Love | Scoop.it
CALGARY, Alberta (Reuters) - A wildfire raging in northeastern Alberta near two major oil sands projects nearly doubled in size to 17,000 hectares (42,000 acres) on Wednesday, although firefighters made

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Your toothpaste may be loaded with tiny plastic beads that never go away

Your toothpaste may be loaded with tiny plastic beads that never go away | Love | Scoop.it
What are microbeads, and why are some states banning them?

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Across U.S., Heaviest Downpours On The Rise | Climate Central

Across U.S., Heaviest Downpours On The Rise | Climate Central | Love | Scoop.it
Very heavy downpours are happening more frequently across most of the U.S.

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Lessons from an ancient climate shift - Yale Climate Connections

Lessons from an ancient climate shift - Yale Climate Connections | Love | Scoop.it
Depleted oxygen zones in the ocean may increase in a warmer climate.

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#Ebola gatekeeper protein identified - #Science News

#Ebola gatekeeper protein identified - #Science News | Love | Scoop.it
Ebola’s ability to infect appears to depend on a key transport protein that guides the virus into cells.

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Stupidity Is Not A Valid Defense For Us - The Automatic Earth

Stupidity Is Not A Valid Defense For Us - The Automatic Earth | Love | Scoop.it

If we can't plead stupidity, what else is there? How do we live with ourselves? Is it all the stuff we buy that manages to numb our brains and consciences?

 

When I see a headline like this one at Bloomberg today, World Needs Record Saudi Oil Supply as OPEC Convenes, there’s just one thought that pops into my head: what the world needs is for us to stop doing this thing we’re doing. Even apart from peak oil concerns, it’s obvious we’re going to run out at some point or another, and it doesn’t matter whether that’s tomorrow or at some other point in the future, though we do know it’s not going to take another 100 years, or even 50.

 

And nothing will ever take the place of oil; once those unique carbons are gone, that’s it, we’ll have to find a completely different way of running our societies, and if we’re not smart enough to prepare for that beforehand, we’ll be cats fighting in a sack and use the last scraps to kill off each other. And our legacy won’t be the Greek thinkers and Picasso and Dostoyevsky and Walt Whitman and Maria Callas, since there won’t be the means for our children anymore to share what makes man great between them. Our main legacy will instead be bloodshed, we will have gone the exact same path that any non-thinking or even primitive organism would have taken, who don’t have opera or philosophy or poetry to their name.


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David Collet's curator insight, August 2, 2014 8:26 PM

A thoughtfull read.