Look Through These
48 views | +0 today
Follow
Look Through These
Personal notebook of valuable resources, news and tips.
Curated by Arttu Vanninen
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Arttu Vanninen
Scoop.it!

Constructive Developmental Framework - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Constructive Developmental Framework (CDF) is a theoretical framework for psychological assessment based on empirical research.

The framework is based on the assumption that an individual’s perception of reality is an actively constructed “world of their own”, unique to them and which they continue to develop over their lifespan. The assessment methodology involves three separate instruments that respectively measure a person’s social-emotional stage, cognitive level of development, and psychological profile. The empirical methodology of CDF is grounded in research which began under Lawrence Kohlberg 40 years ago, continued by Robert Kegan and others, and developed further since 1998 by Dr. Otto Laske, who integrated different forms of assessment and incorporated ideas about dialectical thinking as developed by the Frankfurt School and the philosopher Hegel. In Laske’s conception CDF makes a strict differentiation between social-emotional and cognitive development and relates these two lines of development through empirical research.

Psychological assessment based on CDF measures three essential aspects of a person: Social-emotional Development (ED), Cognitive Development (CD) and personality profile (NP), the latter describing a person’s likely behaviour in terms of their psychological ‘needs’ and ‘press’ - the environmental forces that they perceive acting on them (concepts developed by the psychologist Henry Murray). These three different aspects combine to present a unique picture of the individuality of a person.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Arttu Vanninen
Scoop.it!

Argumentation theory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Argumentation theory, or argumentation, is the interdisciplinary study of how conclusions can be reached through logical reasoning; that is, claims based, soundly or not, on premises. It includes the arts and sciences of civil debate, dialogue, conversation, and persuasion. It studies rules of inference, logic, and procedural rules in both artificial and real world settings.[citation needed]

Argumentation includes debate and negotiation which are concerned with reaching mutually acceptable conclusions. It also encompasses eristic dialog, the branch of social debate in which victory over an opponent is the primary goal. This art and science is often the means by which people protect their beliefs or self-interests in rational dialogue, in common parlance, and during the process of arguing.

Argumentation is used in law, for example in trials, in preparing an argument to be presented to a court, and in testing the validity of certain kinds of evidence. Also, argumentation scholars study the post hoc rationalizations by which organizational actors try to justify decisions they have made irrationally.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Arttu Vanninen
Scoop.it!

Center for Foresight and Innovation - Playbook

Center for Foresight and Innovation - Playbook | Look Through These | Scoop.it
The playbook is packed with multiple methods and techniques, step-by-step instructions, tips, examples, case studies, and more. All available for free download.
Arttu Vanninen's insight:

This seems like a useful resource.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Arttu Vanninen
Scoop.it!

Adult development - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Adult development is a branch of developmental psychology that deals specifically with how adults age through physical, emotional, and cognitive means. One simple breakdown of the field is to look at its three dimensions.

For example, positive adult developmental may be divided into at least six parts: hierarchical complexity, (orders, stages), knowledge, experience, expertise, wisdom, and spirituality.

Nondevelopmental forms include adulthood and adult human behavior.[vague]

Arttu Vanninen's insight:

Is this the route to the subject I found many years ago about adult cognitive development?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Arttu Vanninen
Scoop.it!

Neo-Piagetian theories of cognitive development

Jean Piaget's theory of cognitive development has been criticized on many grounds. One criticism is concerned with the very nature of development itself. It is suggested that Piaget's theory does not explain why development from stage to stage occurs. The theory is also criticized for ignoring individual differences in cognitive development. That is, the theory does not account for the fact that some individuals move from stage to stage faster than other individuals. Finally, another criticism is concerned with the nature of stages themselves. Research shows that the functioning of a person at a given age may be so variable from domain to domain, such as the understanding of social, mathematical, and spatial concepts, that it is not possible to place the person in a single stage.[1] To remove these weaknesses, a group of researchers, who are known as neo-Piagetian theorists, advanced models that integrate concepts from Piaget's theory with concepts from cognitive and differential psychology.[2][3][4][5]

Initially, neo-Piagetian theorists explained cognitive growth along Piagetian stages by invoking information processing capacity as the cause of both development from the one stage to the next and individual differences in developmental rate. Juan Pascual-Leone was the first to advance this approach.[6] Specifically, he argued that human thought is organized in two levels. The first and more basic level is defined by mental power or capacity. That is, this level involves processes that define the volume and kind of information that the individual can process. Working memory is the functional manifestation of mental power. The capacity of working memory is usually specified in reference to the number of information chunks or units that one can keep in mind simultaneously at a given moment. The second level involves mental content as such. That is, it involves concepts and schemes about the physical, the biological, and the social world, and the symbols we use to refer to them, such as words, numbers, mental images. It also involves the mental operations that we can carry on them, such as arithmetic operations on numbers, mental rotation on mental images, etc. Pascual-Leone proposed that the increase of the number of mental units that one can represent simultaneously makes the persons able to handle more complex concepts. For instance, one needs to be able to hold two mental units in mind to be able to decide if one number is bigger than another number. To be able to add them, the person needs to be able to hold three units, that is, the two numbers plus the arithmetic operation to be applied, such as addition or subtraction. To be able to understand proportionality, one must be able to keep in mind five units, that is the two pairs of numbers to be compared and their relation.

According to Pascual-Leone, mental power is equal to 1 scheme or unit of information at the age of 2–3 years and it increases by one unit every second year until it reaches its maximum of 7 units at the age 15 years. He claimed that the classical Piaget's stages of pre-operational, intuitive, early concrete, late concrete, transitional from concrete to formal, early formal, and late formal thought require a mental power of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 mental units, respectively. Having a lesser degree of mental power than required by a task makes the solution of this task impossible, because the necessary relations cannot be represented and computed. Thus, each increase in mental power with age opens the way for the construction of concepts and skills up to the new level of capacity. Falling short or exceeding the mental power that is typical of a given age results in slower or faster rates of development, respectively.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neo-Piagetian_theories_of_cognitive_development

more...
No comment yet.