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Promising New Cancer Drugs Empower the Body’s Own Defense System

Promising New Cancer Drugs Empower the Body’s Own Defense System | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The early success of a new class of cancer drugs, revealed in test results released here over the last several days, has raised hope among the world’s top cancer specialists that they may be on the verge of an important milestone in the fight against the disease.

 

 

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Statins may be linked to cancer survival

(Reuters Health) - Danish cancer patients taking cholesterol-lowering statin drugs were 15 percent less likely to die, of cancer or any other cause, than patients who were not on the popular medications, in a new study.

 

The pattern held regardless of a person's age, cancer type, tumor size or whether it had spread. Only patients who had received chemotherapy showed no apparent benefit from taking statins - the most commonly-prescribed drugs in the world.

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Nanoparticles could lead to stronger drugs, fewer side effects for cancer patients | KurzweilAI

Nanoparticles could lead to stronger drugs, fewer side effects for cancer patients | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

One result of the side effects of cancer treatments is that patients often can’t tolerate or survive a combination of different drugs at the same time — which can limit a doctor’s ability to knock out the disease.

 

The head of a Boston-area biotech called Cerulean Therapeutics thinks the solution is nanoparticle-delivered drugs, which have fewer and less severe side effects. They could make it easier for doctors to mount a multipronged attack on tumors and kill the cells before they can develop a resistance to any one compound.

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No More Skipping Your Medicine – FDA Approves First Digital Pill | Singularity Hub

No More Skipping Your Medicine – FDA Approves First Digital Pill | Singularity Hub | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The Food and Drug Administration has just approved a device that is integrated into pills and let’s doctors know when patients take their medicine – and when they don’t.

 

Adherence to prescriptions is a serious problem, as about half of all patients don’t take medications the way they’re supposed to. But with patients doctors now becoming big brother, that statistic could change drastically.

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Easter Island drug improves learning and memory in mice of all ages

Easter Island drug improves learning and memory in mice of all ages | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Rapamycin, a bacterial product first discovered in a soil sample from Easter Island – also known as Rapa Nui, hence the name – is an immunosuppressant drug used to prevent rejection in organ transplants that has now been found to enhance learning and memory in young and old mice alike.

 

Researchers at the School of Medicine at The University of Texas (UT) Health Science Center San Antonio made the discovery while looking for a way to prevent the decline in cognitive skills that comes with age.

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Virtual safety panel predicts drugs' side effects

Virtual safety panel predicts drugs' side effects | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A team of scientists from the UCSF School of Pharmacy, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research (NIBR) and SeaChange Pharmaceuticals has developed a set of computer models that can predict negative side effects associated with existing drugs. By speeding up the process and increasing accuracy, the software could potentially save billions in research and decrease the number of animals used in toxicity tests.

 

The model, based on UCSF’s “similarity ensemble approach” (SEA), uses the similarities between the shape of each drug and thousands of other compounds to predict possible side effects. The theory behind SEA technology is that proteins can be related by their pharmacology, and these network relationships can be explored to discover new targets for established drugs.

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Anti-Inflammatory Drug with a New Benefit to Glucose

In a modern-day clinical trial of a medicine belonging to one of the world's oldest classes of drugs, researchers have found that a drug related to aspirin and salicylate, which was first used by ancient Egyptians and Greeks to ease pain caused by inflammation, also has glucose-lowering properties and may be a potential treatment for people with type 2 diabetes, according to results presented at the American Diabetes Association's 72nd Scientific Sessions(R).

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Drug Helps Immune System Fight Cancer

Drug Helps Immune System Fight Cancer | Longevity science | Scoop.it

One of the great frustrations for researchers in the war on cancer is that the body’s own defense system does not do a better job fighting the disease. Tumors, it turns out, have a molecular shield that repels attacks from the immune system.

 

Now, a new study says, an experimental drug is showing promise in disabling that shield...

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Automated drug design using synthetic DNA self-assembly | KurzweilAI

Automated drug design using synthetic DNA self-assembly | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Using a simple “drag-and-drop” computer interface and DNA self-assembly techniques, Parabon NanoLabs researchers have developed a new automated method of drug development that could reduce the time required to create and test medications, with the support of an NSF Technology Enhancement for Commercial Partnerships grant.

 

 

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New Biomarker May Allow Earlier Diagnosis of Mesothelioma

"Researchers have shown that the protein fibulin-3 may be able to distinguish patients with mesothelioma from people with similar conditions and from healthy individuals. Although preliminary, the results suggest that this protein may be a promising new biomarker for diagnosing the disease and possibly informing prognosis. The study was published October 11 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

 

Pleural mesothelioma, a disease of the tissue that lines the chest cavity and covers the lungs (the pleura), is an aggressive cancer often associated with asbestos exposure. Patients diagnosed with this disease have a median survival of 1 year.

 

Diagnosing mesothelioma early, when treatment may be most effective, is difficult because of its long latency period and the lack of reliable methods to detect the disease in its early stages. A protein called soluble mesothelin-related protein is the best-studied biomarker for mesothelioma, but the test for it has low sensitivity, meaning that it fails to detect mesothelioma in some people who have the disease.."


Via Brian Shields
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New clot drug for heart patients

New clot drug for heart patients | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Hundreds of thousands of heart patients could benefit from new blood thinning drugs to cut their risk of stroke.

 

The existing (and popular) blood thinning medications coumadin and warfarin have a number of side effects and require frequent monitoring and often dietary adjustments to maintain proper levels.

 

Alternatives to these drugs, although bound to have their own side effects, could help many patients who require blood thinners to reduce stroke risk.

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European regulators back first gene therapy drug

European regulators back first gene therapy drug | Longevity science | Scoop.it

LONDON (Reuters) - European regulators have recommended approval of the Western world's first gene therapy drug -- after rejecting it on three previous occasions -- in a significant advance for the novel medical technology.

 

More than 20 years since the first experiments with the ground-breaking method for fixing faulty genes, scientists and drug companies are still struggling to apply gene therapy in practice.

 

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ImmunID's new biomarker links reduced immune diversity with cancer

ImmunID's new biomarker links reduced immune diversity with cancer | Longevity science | Scoop.it
ImmunID's latest biomarker is named divpenia®, which underpins a new concept for the scientific community for reduced immune diversity of T & B lymphocytes potentially correlated to immune deficiencies.

Via Brian Shields
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Do statins drain your energy?

There is a large population that take 'statin drugs' to lower cholesterol.

 

These drugs are very effective, but can result in muscle pain and fatigue. Why? The drugs deplete the body's natural reserves of CoEnzyme Q10, which is involved in energy production at the cellular level.

 

Fortunately, supplementing with the enzyme can help restore the blood levels and counterract the side effects. But few doctors mention this when they prescribe the drugs.

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Glaxo melanoma drugs beat chemo in pivotal trials

Late-stage trials of two experimental skin cancer drugs from GlaxoSmithKline, each designed to block different pathways used by tumor cells, have found the drugs helped patients with fewer side effects than current chemotherapy. Both drugs, trametinib and dabrafenib, were tested in patients with a mutation in a gene known as BRAF. About half of all melanomas, the deadliest form of skin cancer, have the genetic aberration.

 

Cancer occurs through genetic changes in cells allowing tumor growth factor receptors which activate various pathways, including a protein known as MEK. It is believed that BRAF-mutated melanomas should be particularly dependent on MEK, which is needed to amplify the cancer's genetic signal. Roche's Zelboraf, or vemurafenib, is the only BRAF inhibitor currently approved for treating melanoma. Latest results from a pivotal trial of the Roche drug, presented at a meeting in Chicago of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, found that it improved survival by nearly four months.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Meet ROBOT-Rx, The Robot Pharmacist Doling Out 350 Million Doses Per Year | Singularity Hub

Meet ROBOT-Rx, The Robot Pharmacist Doling Out 350 Million Doses Per Year | Singularity Hub | Longevity science | Scoop.it

You probably didn't know it, but robots already work in pharmacies. Many hospitals have been using ROBOT-Rx to dispense medication doses.

 

With near-perfect accuracy, this robo-pharmacist stores, counts, dispenses, and keeps records. All the humans have to do is prescribe the medication.

 

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