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Guiding stem cells into damaged hearts with MRI and ultrasonics | KurzweilAI

Stem-cell therapy for damaged hearts is a brilliant idea whose time has not yet come. The problem: no way to ensure against faulty initial placement of the stem cells.

Stanford’s Sam Gambhir, PhD, MD, who heads Stanford medical school’s Department of Radiology may have found a way around it.

“You can use ultrasound to visualize the needle through which you deliver stem cells to the heart. But once those cells leave the needle, you’ve lost track of them,” he said.

 

 

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Imaging brain structures that deteriorate in Parkinson’s | KurzweilAI

A new imaging technique developed at MIT offers the first glimpse of the degeneration of two brain structures affected by Parkinson’s disease.

 

The technique, which combines several types of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), could allow doctors to better monitor patients’ progression and track the effectiveness of potential new treatments, says Suzanne Corkin, MIT professor emerita of neuroscience and leader of the research team.

 

 

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GE Silent Scan turns down the volume on MRI scanners

GE Silent Scan turns down the volume on MRI scanners | Longevity science | Scoop.it

GE Healthcare has introduced a new data acquisition technology designed to improve patient comfort by largely eliminating the horrible noise generated during an MRI scan. Conventional MRI scanners can generate noise levels in excess of 110 dBA (creating a din that sounds like a cross between a vehicle's reverse warning horn and a Star Trek phaser) but GE says its new Silent Scan MRI technology can reduce this to just above background noise levels in the exam room.

The noise that MRI scanners produce is related to changes in the magnetic field that allow the slice by slice body scan to be carried out. In recent years, industry efforts to speed up the scanning process have also resulted in louder and louder scans. The designers have attempted to dampen these noises with mufflers and baffles, achieving only limited success.

 

 

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New MRI technique may predict rate of progress and prion-like spread of dementias | KurzweilAI

New MRI technique may predict rate of progress and prion-like spread of dementias | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A new technique for analyzing brain images may make it possible to predict the rate of progression and physical path of many degenerative brain diseases, using just one magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image...

 

The technique also supports mounting evidence that dementias spread through the brain along specific neuronal pathways in the same manner as prion diseases."

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