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Toxic interaction in neurons that leads to dementia and ALS | KurzweilAI

Toxic interaction in neurons that leads to dementia and ALS | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida have uncovered a toxic cellular process by which a protein that maintains the health of neurons becomes deficient and can lead to dementia.

The findings shed new light on the link between culprits implicated in two devastating neurological diseases: Alzheimer’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, which afflicts physicist Stephen Hawking.

There is no cure for frontotemporal dementia, a disorder that affects personality, behavior and language and is second only to Alzheimer’s disease as the most common form of early-onset dementia.
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Quick Test Speeds Search for Alzheimer's Drugs: Compound Restores Motor Function and Longevity to Fruit Flies | ZeitNews

Quick Test Speeds Search for Alzheimer's Drugs: Compound Restores Motor Function and Longevity to Fruit Flies | ZeitNews | Longevity science | Scoop.it
An efficient, high-volume technique for testing potential drug treatments for Alzheimer's disease uncovered an organic compound that restored motor function and longevity to fruit flies with the disease, according to new research that could help...

Via LeapMind
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Imaging brain structures that deteriorate in Parkinson’s | KurzweilAI

A new imaging technique developed at MIT offers the first glimpse of the degeneration of two brain structures affected by Parkinson’s disease.

 

The technique, which combines several types of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), could allow doctors to better monitor patients’ progression and track the effectiveness of potential new treatments, says Suzanne Corkin, MIT professor emerita of neuroscience and leader of the research team.

 

 

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WSJ: Head in the Cloud, Human Intelligence Takes a Leap

WSJ: Head in the Cloud, Human Intelligence Takes  a Leap | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Will our increased understanding of how our brains work allow us to transcend human nature?

 

Yes indeed.

 

Ray Kurzweil, the software inventor and visionary, argues that human intelligence will radically evolve beyond biology and become embedded in new "spiritual" machines.

 

The book, How to Create a Mind, is available through Amazon and BN.com

 

 

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Exclusive: Ray Kurzweil Interview – The Future of Man And Machine

Exclusive: Ray Kurzweil Interview – The Future of Man And Machine | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Video: Singularity Hub’s recent interview with Ray Kurzweil

 

The interview with Kurzweil focused at first on his new book to be released November 13 “How to Create a Mind”, but then moved on to broader topics, such as Kurzweil’s more general thoughts on the future of man and machine, and Kurzweil’s personal goals for his work. The interview features a closeup, raw style.

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Hormone therapy may cut Alzheimer's risk in menopausal women

Hormone therapy may cut Alzheimer's risk in menopausal women | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The latest data from a long-running study of hormone therapy suggests women who started taking hormone replacements within five years of menopause were 30 percent less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease than women who started years later.

 

 

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The strange neuroscience of immortality | KurzweilAI

The strange neuroscience of immortality | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Neuroscientist Kenneth Hayworth believes that he can live forever, the Chronicle of Higher Education reports. But first he has to die.

 

“The human race is on a beeline to mind uploading: We will preserve a brain, slice it up, simulate it on a computer, and hook it up to a robot body,” he says.

 

He wants that brain to be his brain. He wants his 100 billion neurons and more than 100 trillion synapses to be encased in a block of transparent, amber-colored resin — before he dies of natural causes.

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Johns Hopkins surgeons implant first brain ‘pacemaker’ for Alzheimer’s disease in US | KurzweilAI

Johns Hopkins surgeons implant first brain ‘pacemaker’ for Alzheimer’s disease in US | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have surgically implanted a pacemaker-like device into the brain of a patient in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease, the first such operation in the United States.

 

The device, which provides deep brain stimulation and has been used in thousands of people with Parkinson’s disease, is seen as a possible means of boosting memory and reversing cognitive decline.

 

 

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Studies of gene regulation in brain development may lead to new treatment of mental disorders | KurzweilAI

Studies of gene regulation in brain development may lead to new treatment of mental disorders | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A team of researchers at the University of California, San Diego and the Institut Pasteur, Paris has come up with a novel way to describe brain development.

 

The findings could lead to new drug designs for mental disorders such as autism-spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia.

 

 

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A New Look At Einstein’s Brain May Answer Why He Was So Smart

A New Look At Einstein’s Brain May Answer Why He Was So Smart | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Thanks to work of pathologist Thomas Harvey to preserve Albert Eisntein’s brain decades ago, we can continue to busy ourselves today with trying to figure out what made Albert Einstein so smart.

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CultureLab: Will we ever understand how our brains work?

CultureLab: Will we ever understand how our brains work? | Longevity science | Scoop.it

When it comes to the human brain, many scientists believe that we are incapable of understanding how it works because we lack the tools and intelligence to measure its mind-blowing complexity.

 

Others are starting to question that notion, and to subtly redefine the task. In How to Create a Mind, futurist Ray Kurzweil has ridden into battle for the challengers.

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Exercise may protect the aging brain, a study shows

Exercise may protect the aging brain, a study shows | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A new study suggests that physical activity may mitigate cognitive decline in older adults.

 

Men who were inactive displayed the greatest atrophy (brain shrinkage).

 

Contrary to common understanding, social and intellectual activity did not appear to affect shrinkage according to this study.

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Ray Kurzweil’s How to Create a Mind to be published Nov. 13 | KurzweilAI

Ray Kurzweil’s How to Create a Mind to be published Nov. 13 | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Ray Kurzweil's next book --- How to Create a Mind: The Secret of Human Thought Revealed* --- will be published Nov. 13, Viking announced today.

 

In this new work, the bold futurist and author of The New York Times bestseller The Singularity Is Near explores the limitless potential of reverse engineering the human brain..

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