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Microbubbles could image the heart and deliver anti-clotting drugs simultaneously

Microbubbles could image the heart and deliver anti-clotting drugs simultaneously | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A scientist with GE Global Research is now looking into the use of “microbubbles” as a mobile means of imaging the heart and possibly even treating it.

 

The bubbles that biologist Jason Castle is working with are described as “tiny gas-filled spheres the size of red bloods cells.” Delivered through an ordinary IV, they can travel through the bloodstream to the heart – or anywhere else.

 

 

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How Genomics Is Changing Clinical Outcomes: Q&A with Heidi Rehm | New York Genome Center

How Genomics Is Changing Clinical Outcomes: Q&A with Heidi Rehm | New York Genome Center | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Heidi Rehm has been using disease-targeted gene panels to diagnose patients in her clinical molecular genetics practice for a decade. Having adopted next-generation sequencing approaches two years ago, and whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing for some patients in the past year, she is a pioneer in applying genomics in the clinic.


Via Brian Shields
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Brian Shields's curator insight, February 12, 2013 8:36 PM

Very good discussion on the current impact that genetic and genomic sequencing are having on clinical decisions, and a look into the future when  genome analysis is much more cost effective.


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Yearly payments to Canada's doctors exceeds $20B: report

Yearly payments to Canada's doctors exceeds $20B: report | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Canada's doctors are paid more than $20 billion overall a year, making physicians' services the third largest component of health-care spending after hospitals and drugs, a report released Tuesday says.
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The future of medicine is now | KurzweilAI

The future of medicine is now | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Six medical innovations are poised to transform the way we fight disease, The Wall Street Journal reports.

Surgeons at Boston Children’s Hospital have developed a way to help children born with half a heart to essentially grow a whole one — by marshaling the body’s natural capacity to heal and develop.Oxford Nanopore Technologies has unveiled the first of a generation of tiny DNA sequencing...

 

 

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The New Medicine: Hacking our biology to extend our lives- IEEE Spectrum

The New Medicine: Hacking our biology to extend our lives- IEEE Spectrum | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The New Medicine: Hacking Our Biology is part of the series “Engineers of the New Millennium” from IEEE Spectrum magazine and the Directorate for Engineering of the National Science Foundation.

 

These stories explore technological advances in medical inventions to enhance and extend life.

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New nanoparticles shrink tumors in mice | KurzweilAI

New nanoparticles shrink tumors in mice | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

MIT researchers have developed RNA-delivering nanoparticles that allow for rapid screening of new drug targets in mice.

 

By sequencing cancer-cell genomes, scientists have discovered vast numbers of genes that are mutated, deleted or copied in cancer cells. This treasure trove is a boon for researchers seeking new drug targets, but it is nearly impossible to test them all in a timely fashion.

 

 

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Nanoparticles cross blood-brain barrier, enhance medication delivery and MRI performance | KurzweilAI

Nanoparticles cross blood-brain barrier, enhance medication delivery and MRI performance | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

"Researchers at Harvard-affiliated McLean Hospital have developed a new category of non-toxic, protein-based green nanoparticles that can non-invasively cross the blood brain barrier and transport various types of drugs."

 

The particles "crossed and/or bypassed the blood-brain barrier without enhancers or modifications, unlike other nanoparticles. These findings open the door to exploring..."

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U.S. spending on medicines fell for first time in 2012

(Reuters) - Patent expirations on big-name drugs such as Lipitor and Plavix has resulted in modestly less spending on medicines in the United States for the first time in at least 55 years, according to...
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Researchers say AI prescribes better treatment than doctors

Researchers say AI prescribes better treatment than doctors | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Two Indiana University researchers have developed a computer model they say can identify significantly better and less-expensive treatments than can doctors acting alone. It’s just the latest evidence that big data will have a profound impact on our health care system.

 

How much better? They claim a better than 50 percent reduction in costs and more than 40 percent better patient outcomes.

 

The idea behind the research, carried out by Casey Bennett and Kris Hauser, is simple and gets to the core of why so many people care so much about data in the first place: If doctors can consider what’s actually happening and likely to happen instead of relying on intuition, they should be able to make better decisions.

 

In order to prove out their hypothesis, the researchers worked with “clinical data, demographics and other information on over 6,700 patients who had major clinical depression diagnoses, of which about 65 to 70 percent had co-occurring chronic physical disorders like diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease.” They built a model using Markov decision processes — which predict the probabilities of future events based on those immediately preceding them — and dynamic decision networks — which extend the Markov processes by considering the specific features of those events in order to determine the probabilities. Essentially, their model considers the specifics of a patient’s current state and then determines the best action to effect the best possible outcome.

 

Specifically, Bennett and Hauser found via a simulation of 500 random cases that their model decreased the cost per unit of outcome change to $189 from the $497 without it, an improvement of 58.5 percent. They found their original model improved patient outcomes by nearly 35 percent, but that tweaking a few parameters could bring that number to 41.9 percent.

 

IBM has been banging this drum loudly, most recently with two new commercial versions of its Watson system — one of which is designed to determine the best-possible course of treatment for lung cancer patient by analyzing their situations against a library of millions of pages of clinical evidence and medical research.

 

So, although we won’t hear “Paging Dr. Watson” at the hospital anytime soon, there’s an increasingly high chance our doctors will retire to their offices with our charts and ask a computer system of some sort what might be wrong with us and how they might best fix it.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Skip Stein's curator insight, February 12, 2013 5:28 AM

This is compounded by the fact that most of the illnesses in the study are direct results from poor/lousy nutrition.  Since doctors get little or no training in nutrition during all those years in medical school, the obvious solutions, the most natural and inexpensive ones are not even mentioned.  Plant based nutrition can help reduce the impact of many illnesses and in many cases totally reverse/cure the 'disease'.  Things like heart disease, diabetes 2, many cancers and a host of other ailments from depression, hypertension, high cholesterol and a plethora of others.

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Analysis: Entering the age of the $1 million medicine

Analysis: Entering the age of the $1 million medicine | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The Western world's first drug to fix faulty genes promises to transform the lives of patients with an ultra-rare disease that clogs their blood with fat. The only snag is the price.

 

The gene therapy for lipoprotein lipase deficiency (LPLD), a hereditary disorder that raises the risk of potentially lethal inflammation of the pancreas, is likely to cost more than $1 million per patient when it goes on sale in Europe this summer.

 

 

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Paging Dr. Watson: IBM and Cleveland Clinic Collaborate to Train Watson in Medicine

Paging Dr. Watson: IBM and Cleveland Clinic Collaborate to Train Watson in Medicine | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Can you imagine telling someone a century ago that a hundred years hence a stack of electrified silicon would be studying for its medical exam?

 

IBM announced its question answering machine Watson will begin to study medicine.

 

The students and staff at the Cleveland Clinic will do for Watson what the rest of us do for Google—hone its answering accumen by using it. 

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Danny Hillis – With A Drop Of Your Blood, We’ll Soon Diagnose Your Disease Before You Even Have Symptoms | Singularity Hub

Danny Hillis – With A Drop Of Your Blood, We’ll Soon Diagnose Your Disease Before You Even Have Symptoms | Singularity Hub | Longevity science | Scoop.it

As the data piles up, preventative medicine will become a quantitative endeavor.

 

Danny Hillis believes the doctors visit of the future will be a simple blood test that measures proteins, lipids and some other key signals, which will then be plugged into a systematic database to help us treat diseases long before any symptoms arise.

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No More Skipping Your Medicine – FDA Approves First Digital Pill | Singularity Hub

No More Skipping Your Medicine – FDA Approves First Digital Pill | Singularity Hub | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The Food and Drug Administration has just approved a device that is integrated into pills and let’s doctors know when patients take their medicine – and when they don’t.

 

Adherence to prescriptions is a serious problem, as about half of all patients don’t take medications the way they’re supposed to. But with patients doctors now becoming big brother, that statistic could change drastically.

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Cancer: 'Book of knowledge' published | BBC News

Cancer: 'Book of knowledge' published | BBC News | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A new volume has been published in the growing database of cancer knowledge. This 'Book of cancer knowledge' is predicted to speed up the development of new cancer drugs.

 

This new data compilation includes details on how many types of cancer cells react to various anti-cancer chemicals. The hope is that this brings us closer to personalized cancer medicine.

 

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