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Longevity science
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Measuring the human pulse from tiny head movements to help diagnose cardiac disease | KurzweilAI

Measuring the human pulse from tiny head movements to help diagnose cardiac disease | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have developed a new algorithm that can accurately measure the heart rates of people depicted in ordinary digital video by analyzing imperceptibly small head movements that accompany the rush of blood caused by the heart’s contractions.

 

In tests, the algorithm gave pulse measurements that were consistently within a few beats per minute of those produced by electrocardiograms (EKGs). It was also able to provide useful estimates of the time intervals between beats, a measurement that can be used to identify patients at risk for cardiac events.

 

A video-based pulse-measurement system could be useful for monitoring newborns or the elderly, whose sensitive skin could be damaged by frequent attachment and removal of EKG leads.

 

 

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New method of mass-producing high-quality DNA molecules | KurzweilAI

New method of mass-producing high-quality DNA molecules | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A new method of manufacturing short, single-stranded DNA molecules can solve many of the problems associated with current production methods.

 

The new method can be of value to development of drugs consisting of DNA fragments and to DNA nanotechnology research.

 

The novel technique for manufacturing short, single-stranded DNA molecules — or oligonucleotides — has been developed by researchers at Karolinska Institute in Sweden and Harvard University.

 

 

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Stem cell injections improve spinal injuries in rats | KurzweilAI

Stem cell injections improve spinal injuries in rats | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A single injection of human neural stem cells produced neuronal regeneration and improvement of function and mobility in rats impaired by an acute spinal cord injury (SCI), an international team led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine reports.

 

Grafting neural stem cells derived from a human fetal spinal cord to the rats’ spinal injury site produced an array of therapeutic benefits — from less muscle spasticity to new connections between the injected stem cells and surviving host neurons.

 

 

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AnalyticalInstrument's curator insight, May 29, 2013 11:49 AM

Can we get them to test them on rat knees?

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Reducing caloric intake delays nerve cell loss | KurzweilAI

Reducing caloric intake delays nerve cell loss | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Activating an enzyme known to play a role in the anti-aging benefits of calorie restriction delays the loss of brain cells and preserves cognitive function in mice, according to a study published in the May 22 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

 

The findings could one day guide researchers to discover drug alternatives that slow the progress of age-associated impairments in the brain.

 

 

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Scientists discover why a specific cancer drug is so effective | KurzweilAI

Scientists discover why a specific cancer drug is so effective | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists from the Manchester Collaborative Center for Inflammation Research (MCCIR) have discovered why a particular cancer drug is so effective at killing cells. Their findings could be used to aid the design of future cancer treatments.

Professor Daniel Davis and his team used high quality video imaging to investigate why the drug rituximab is so effective at killing cancerous B cells. It is widely used in the treatment of B cell malignancies, such as lymphoma and leukaemia — as well as in autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.

 

 

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Future ‘microrockets’ and ‘micromotors’ to deliver drugs, perform microsurgery | KurzweilAI

Future ‘microrockets’ and ‘micromotors’ to deliver drugs, perform microsurgery | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

An advance in micromotor technology is opening the door to broad new medical and industrial uses for these tiny devices, scientists said the national American Chemical Society meeting this week.

 

Akin to the invention of cars that fuel themselves from the pavement or air, rather than gasoline or batteries,

 

Joseph Wang, D.Sc., who leads research on the motors, said that efforts to build minute, self-powered robot devices have evoked memories of the 1966 science fiction film Fantastic Voyage. It featured a miniaturized submarine, which doctors injected into a patient. It then navigated through blood vessels to remove a blood clot in the brain.

 

 

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High speed cancer-cell testing | KurzweilAI

High speed cancer-cell testing | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

 

Fast, precise, inexpensive cancer-cell testing device (credit: EPFL)

 

Among a significant percentage of patients, the risk of metastasis of cancer is particularly expressed by the presence of an abnormal amount of protein HER2 on the surface of cancer cells.

 

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Graham Player Ph.D.'s curator insight, April 3, 2013 11:04 AM

A new diagnostic device has been developed that tests for the presence of a protein on the surface of cancer cells. The test can be done in just a few minutes compared to the current lengthy traditional method.

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How would you like to invest in immortality? | KurzweilAI

How would you like to invest in immortality? | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

With his 2045 Initiative, Russian Internet mogul Dmitry Itskov is looking for backers for the world’s first immortality research center.

The new venture sells itself: invest in his new research and development interest and the payoff could be immortality, reports Fortune.

 

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Engineered artificial human livers for drug testing and discovery | KurzweilAI

Engineered artificial human livers for drug testing and discovery | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) researchers have engineered an artificial human liver that mimics the natural tissue environment closely.

 

The development makes it possible for companies to predict the toxicity of new drugs earlier, potentially speeding up the drug development process and reducing the cost of manufacturing

 

 

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Rapid point-of-care testing for multiple diseases from a drop of blood | KurzweilAI

Rapid point-of-care testing for multiple diseases from a drop of blood | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A diagnostic system using DNA powder and gold nanoparticles being developed by scientists at the University of Toronto’s Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering could provide rapid point-of-care diagnosis of the world’s leading infectious diseases in the near future.

 

BBME PhD student Kyryl Zagorovsky has developed a rapid diagnostic biosensor that will allow technicians to test for multiple diseases at the same time with one small sample, and with high accuracy and sensitivity. The biosensor relies upon gold nanoparticles, which change color.

 

 

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Kevin Moran's curator insight, March 5, 2013 7:00 AM

Technology Continues To Empower Patients When It Come To Early Detection & Treatment!

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3D-printing human embryonic stem cells for drug testing, future replacement of human organs | KurzweilAI

3D-printing human embryonic stem cells for drug testing, future replacement of human organs | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A new 3D printing process using human stem cells could pave the way to custom replacement organs for patients, eliminating the need for organ donation and immune suppression, and solving the problem of transplant rejection.

 

The process, developed at Edinburgh-based Heriot-Watt University, in partnership with Roslin Cellab, could also speed up and improve the process of reliable, animal-free drug testing by growing three-dimensional human tissues and structures for pharmaceuticals to be tested on.

 

 

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Estibaliz Undiano Hernandez's curator insight, November 17, 2013 4:22 AM

Mediante este pequeño artículo me gustaría destacar la importancia de las nuevas técnicas tecnológicas. Es una manera de ir sustituyendo poco a poco la experimentación animal en la ciencia. La técnica que aquí se describe es además sencilla y no produce riesgo alguno para la salud.

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Drug-delivery nanoparticles mimic white blood cells to avoid immune rejection | KurzweilAI

Drug-delivery nanoparticles mimic white blood cells to avoid immune rejection | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists at The Methodist Hospital Research Institute have found a possible way to fool the immune system to prevent it from recognizing and destroying nanoparticles before they deliver their drug payloads.

 

“Our goal was to make a particle that is camouflaged within our bodies and escapes the surveillance of the immune system to reach its target undiscovered,” said Department of Medicine Co-Chair Ennio Tasciotti, Ph.D., the study’s principal investigator.

 

 

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How to kill lymphoma cancer cells without chemotherapy | KurzweilAI

How to kill lymphoma cancer cells without chemotherapy | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Northwestern Medicine researchers have developed a nanoparticle that attacks a cancerous lymphoma cell by mimicking HDL.(high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol, an essential nutrient for the cell.

 

The nanoparticle tricks the cell by blocking cholesterol from entering the cell. Deprived of an essential nutrient, the cell eventually dies.

 

 

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Reversing the loss of brain connections in Alzheimer’s disease | KurzweilAI

Reversing the loss of brain connections in Alzheimer’s disease | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The first experimental drug to boost brain synapses lost in Alzheimer’s disease has been developed by researchers at Sanford-Burnham.

 

The drug, called NitroMemantine, combines two FDA-approved medicines to stop the destructive cascade of changes in the brain that destroys the connections between neurons, leading to memory loss and cognitive decline.

 

 

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A step closer to artificial livers | KurzweilAI

A step closer to artificial livers | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

MIT engineer Sangeeta Bhatia and colleagues have have identified a dozen chemical compounds that can help liver cells maintain their normal function while grown in a lab dish and also multiply to produce new tissue.

 

Cells grown this way could help researchers develop engineered tissue to treat many of the 500 million people suffering from chronic liver diseases such as hepatitis C, according to the researchers.

 

 

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Stroke patients show signs of recovery in stem-cell treatment trial | KurzweilAI

Stroke patients show signs of recovery in stem-cell treatment trial | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Encouraging interim data from the world’s first clinical trial examining the safety of neural stem cell treatment in ischemic stroke patients has been reported by researchers ahead of an application for Phase II trials.

 

 

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Scientists discover how to slow down aging in mice and increase longevity | KurzweilAI

Scientists discover how to slow down aging in mice and increase longevity | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists discover how to slow down aging in mice and increase longevity
Blocking a specific protein complex in the hypothalamus and injecting a hormone slow aging and cognitive decline


Their discovery of a specific age-related signaling pathway opens up new strategies for combating diseases of old age and extending lifespan.

 

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Ramond Smith's comment, May 5, 2013 12:28 PM
there is nothing you people cannot do>>>what is left now is to make normal human and send him on errand.what about that?
Natalia Zhukova's curator insight, May 5, 2013 1:20 PM

While young people are not so enthusiastic about having many children, and older ones will be getting even older, what will the human society look like?

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Researchers bypass the blood-brain barrier, widening treatment options for neurodegenerative and central nervous system disease | KurzweilAI

Researchers bypass the blood-brain barrier, widening treatment options for neurodegenerative and central nervous system disease | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The first known method to permanently bypass the blood-brain barrier*, using mucosa, or the lining of the nose, has been demonstrated by researchers in the department of Otology and Laryngology at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School and the Biomedical Engineering Department of Boston University.

The method opens the door to new treatment options for those with neurodegenerative and CNS disease.

 

 

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Ask Ray | Thoughts on the consequences of the elimination of aging | KurzweilAI

Ask Ray | Thoughts on the consequences of the elimination of aging | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

What if humans were to completely eliminate the process of aging in, say, the next ten or twenty years (probably before the technological singularity)?

 

What would be the worldwide consequences of such a development?

 

Would the elimination of aging, and thereby the elimination of death, ultimately, have good or bad consequences?

 

 

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Scott Baldwin's comment, April 9, 2013 9:25 PM
Well, I hate to suggest such horrible expectations, but I fear that the following would occur, over time: Overpopulation, insurmountable taxing of natural resources, mounting tensions leading to unbridled war, and more death than what happened naturally prior to the elimination of aging. I suspect that the only thing that could prevent these inevitabilities would be the development of space travel sufficient to reduce earth's bio-load, and the massive reduction of our collective carbon footprint by emerging green technology.
Scott Baldwin's comment, April 9, 2013 10:33 PM
Holy smokes, I did not click through to the actual article and the other responses, but it seems there are some similar thoughts.
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Wireless device powers implanted blood-pressure sensor, eliminating batteries | KurzweilAI

Wireless device powers implanted blood-pressure sensor, eliminating batteries | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at A*STAR Institute of Microelectronics in Singapore are developing a prototype wireless device that powers an implanted blood-pressure sensor, eliminating the need to recharge or replace a battery.

The microscale electronic sensor monitors blood flow through artificial blood vessels. Surgeons use these prosthetic grafts to bypass diseased or clogged blood vessels in patients experiencing restricted blood supply, for example.

 

 

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Scientists transplant neural stem cells from a monkey’s skin into its brain | KurzweilAI

Scientists transplant neural stem cells from a monkey’s skin into its brain | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists have transplanted neural cells derived from stem cells from a monkey’s skin into its brain and watched the cells develop into several types of mature brain cells.

After six months, the cells looked entirely normal, and were only detectable because they initially were tagged with a fluorescent protein.

 

 

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Bioteeth generated from your own cells | KurzweilAI

Bioteeth generated from your own cells | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers are developing a method to replace missing teeth with new bioengineered teeth generated from a person’s own gum cells.

Current implant-based methods of whole tooth replacement fail to reproduce a natural root structure and as a consequence of the friction from eating and other jaw movement, loss of jaw bone can occur around the implant.

Research towards producing bioengineered teeth (bioteeth) has largely focused on generating immature teeth (teeth primordia) that mimic those in the embryo that can be transplanted as small cell pellets into the adult jaw to develop into functional teeth, the researchers say.

 

 

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Treatment to prevent Alzheimer’s disease moves a step closer | KurzweilAI

A new drug designed to prevent the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease could enter clinical trials in a few years’  time, according to scientists.

Alzheimer’s disease begins when a protein called amyloid-β (Aβ) starts to clump together in senile plaques in the brain, damaging nerve cells and leading to memory loss and confusion.

 

 

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Christina Mediate's comment, February 24, 2013 2:56 PM
Being able to stop the formation of senile plaques makes this drug look promising. Those plaques are what cause the damage to the brain cells and start the initial memory loss. I'm anxious to see how it works on humans though. Right now it's only safe on the mice. But this is a very crucial step towards a possible new treatment or cure for the disease.
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Could stem cells repair damaged cones in retinas, allowing for daylight color vision? | KurzweilAI

Could stem cells repair damaged cones in retinas, allowing for daylight color vision? | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

For some time geneticists have known that stem cells in zebrafish can replace damaged vision cells.

 

This study showed that cone damage, rather than just rod damage, is possible with these stem cells.

 

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Artificial pancreas and algorithm improve treatment for type 1 diabetes | KurzweilAI

Artificial pancreas and algorithm improve treatment for type 1 diabetes | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The first trial comparing a new dual-hormone “artificial pancreas” with conventional diabetes treatment using an insulin pump has been completed by researchers at IRCM (Institut de Recherches Cliniques) of Montreal, led by endocrinologist Dr. Rémi Rabasa-Lhoret. It showed improved glucose levels and lower risks of hypoglycemia.

 

 

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