Longevity science
75.3K views | +2 today
Follow
Longevity science
Live longer in good health and you will have a chance to extend your healthy life even further
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Microbubbles could image the heart and deliver anti-clotting drugs simultaneously

Microbubbles could image the heart and deliver anti-clotting drugs simultaneously | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A scientist with GE Global Research is now looking into the use of “microbubbles” as a mobile means of imaging the heart and possibly even treating it.

 

The bubbles that biologist Jason Castle is working with are described as “tiny gas-filled spheres the size of red bloods cells.” Delivered through an ordinary IV, they can travel through the bloodstream to the heart – or anywhere else.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Yoga may aid people with irregular heart rhythm

Yoga may aid people with irregular heart rhythm | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Regular yoga classes could help people with a common heart rhythm problem manage their symptoms while also improving their state of mind, a new study suggests.

 

According to the American Heart Association, about 2.7 million people in the U.S. have atrial fibrillation (AF), in which the heart's upper chambers quiver chaotically instead of contracting normally.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

One in 12 in military has clogged heart arteries

One in 12 in military has clogged heart arteries | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Just over one in 12 U.S. service members who died in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars had plaque buildup in the arteries around their hearts - an early sign of heart disease, according to a new study.

 

None of them had been diagnosed with heart disease before deployment, researchers said.

 

"This is a young, healthy, fit group," said the study's lead author, Dr. Bryant Webber, from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Office Attack: stressed at work? Look out for your heart

LONDON (Reuters) - People who have highly demanding jobs and little freedom to make decisions are 23 percent more likely to have a heart attack compared with their less stressed out colleagues, according.

 

Perspective is needed, though. About 3% of heart attacks may come from work stress, but 36% come from smoking and 12% from sedentary living.

 

If you or someone you know can say 'yes' to 2+ of these points, lifestyle changes are in order.

 

-I work too hard, my job stresses me out

-I spend long hours sitting at my desk

-I rarely exercise

-I take cigarette breaks during the day

-I eat fast food or prepackaged food almost everyday

 

Please protect your heart.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Review backs nutrition for cutting stroke risk

Review backs nutrition for cutting stroke risk | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Increasing dietary intake of fruit and vegetables could help slash the risk of stroke, though more information is needed on how other nutrients and diets can modify risks, says a new review of clinical data.

 

Due to small study groups, inconsistent data, and numerous variables, there is no one diet or nutrient proven to reduce stroke.

 

Bottom Line?

Plenty of vegetables and fruits are healthy for the body, no matter who you ask. When it comes to fat, salt, fish, and other dietary factors, there is no shining answer. But minimizing salt, avoiding fried foods, and enjoying life a little won't steer you wrong.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

HDL influences synthesis and absorption of cholesterol

HDL influences synthesis and absorption of cholesterol | Longevity science | Scoop.it

New research indicates that HDL concentrations in the blood influence the synthesis and absorption of cholesterol by the body, besides being linked to how insulin impacts on the metabolism of glucose. HDL, or high-density lipoprotein, is also commonly referred to as "good cholesterol."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Prawn Proteins Eased Blood Pressure

Prawn Proteins Eased Blood Pressure | Longevity science | Scoop.it

One in every four American adults has high blood pressure also known as hypertension.

For decades, it’s been clear that the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in seafood (DHA and EPA) can produce a relatively small but significant drop in blood pressure.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Tea’s health benefits boost its popularity

Tea’s health benefits boost its popularity | Longevity science | Scoop.it

 

The most striking studies find a connection to reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.

 

In the latte-obsessed United States, tea is gaining ground as scientists and the public learn more about its benefits.

A growing body of research suggests that the world’s second-most-consumed beverage — only water is more popular — helps prevent cardiovascular disease, burn calories and ward off some types of cancer.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Framingham data adds to ‘accumulating evidence’ for lycopene’s heart health benefits

Framingham data adds to ‘accumulating evidence’ for lycopene’s heart health benefits | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Increased intakes of lycopene are associated with a reduction in the incidence of cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease, says a new study from Tufts and Boston University.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Induced "pacemaker" heart cells could take the place of man-made pacemakers

Induced "pacemaker" heart cells could take the place of man-made pacemakers | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute have successfully reprogrammed ordinary heart cells to become exact replicas of so-called “pacemaker” heart cells. Such replica cells could conceivably one day be used instead of electronic pacemakers, in patients with heart disease.

 

Also known as SAN cells, pacemaker cells constitute about 10,000 of the human heart’s approximately 10 billion total cells. They generate coordinated electrical impulses that result in rhythmic contractions of the heart muscle – in other words, they allow the heart to beat. If something goes wrong with them, the implantation of an electronic pacemaker is often required ... for now.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Radio waves used to wirelessly power tiny heart implant

Radio waves used to wirelessly power tiny heart implant | Longevity science | Scoop.it

How do you power an implant? Surgical battery replacement is undesirable...

 

Ada Poon, an assistant professor of electrical engineering at Stanford, and doctoral candidates Sanghoek Kim and John Ho have demonstrated that it’s possible to construct a super-small implantable cardiac device the size of a 1.6 millimeter-wide cube.

 

The device uses gigahertz-frequency radio waves that can power extremely small devices five centimeters (1.96 in) inside the chest on the surface of the heart – a depth once thought impossible.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ray and Terry's from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Very early in life, stem cells completely fix heart

Very early in life, stem cells completely fix heart | Longevity science | Scoop.it
New research shows that in a two-day-old mouse, a heart attack causes active stem cells to grow new heart cells and a few months after an attack, the heart is mostly repaired.

 

But in an adult mouse, recovery from such an attack leads to classic after-effects: scar tissue, permanent loss of function, and life-threatening arrhythmias.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

People on calorie restriction have better heart rate variability

People who restrict their caloric intake in an effort to live longer have hearts that function more like those in people who are 20 years younger.

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that a key measure of the heart's ability to adapt to physical activity, stress, sleep and other factors that influence the rate at which the heart pumps blood, doesn't decline nearly as rapidly in people who have significantly restricted their caloric intake for an average of seven years.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Heart Failure Findings Favor Omega-3s over Statin Drug

Heart Failure Findings Favor Omega-3s over Statin Drug | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The American Heart Association and other leading health authorities recommend consuming fish oil and fatty fish high in omega-3 fatty acids, for two reasons:

 

1) To help prevent strokes and cardiovascular disease in healthy people.

 

2) To reduce the risk of stroke, sudden death, or a second heart attack among patients diagnosed with cardiovascular disease.

 

So consider salmon, mahi mahi, tilapia, or other sustainable fish for your summer grilling protein. They are delicious and will keep your heart healthy, your brain strong, and your eyesight sharp.

 

Sustainable fish guide: http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/cr_seafoodwatch/sfw_recommendations.aspx

more...
No comment yet.