Longevity science
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Live longer in good health and you will have a chance to extend your healthy life even further
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Dance for Parkinson’s Disease: Movement as medicine

Dance for Parkinson’s Disease: Movement as medicine | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Dance has shown short-term benefits for people with Parkinson’s disease.
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Fitness ideas get financial muscle

Fitness ideas get financial muscle | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Ryon Lane wanted to run to yoga class. There was just one problem with that plan: his mat. A three-mile jog from Capitol Hill to Dupont Circle with a rolled-up piece of rubber resting on his shoulder wasn’t particularly appealing. So the lawyer hopped online to shop for a mat he could fold up and stash in a backpack.

Lane couldn’t find one, which is why people searching for a similar product today are stumbling across his Kickstarter campaign for the YogoMat. The lightweight design — with attached straps that allow for easy cleaning and drying in the shower — was something the 36-year-old developed for his own practice. When fellow students started asking about where they could buy one, Lane realized he had a business plan.

 

 

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Fitness after 65 is no one-size-fits-all endeavor

Fitness after 65 is no one-size-fits-all endeavor | Longevity science | Scoop.it

NEW YORK (Reuters) - America's aging population is posing special challenges, fitness experts say, because it is difficult to design effective workout routines for people with such a wide range of abilities.

 

Physical activity can reduce the risk of diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and osteoporosis...

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The armchair turned fitness trainer

The armchair turned fitness trainer | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers have created a prototype armchair designed to take care of the elderly by giving them health and fitness advice ... and even a workout.

 

Developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits (IIS) in Germany, the GEWOS (Gesund Wohnen Mit Stil or Healthy Living With Style) armchair looks like an ordinary, comfortable chair. The difference is that it contains sensors built into the seat cushions, backrest and armrest that measure the heartbeat and oxygen saturation of the seated person, along with an integrated rowing machine that can get you exercising on the spot.

 

 

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UCanRow2's curator insight, July 31, 2013 12:14 PM

Hmmm.  A recliner that doubles as a rowing machine.  Would you use this? 

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Whole body vibration may help elderly get up and go

When the elderly can't exercise, stints on a vibrating platform may help older adults become slightly stronger, faster and more agile, according to a small short-term study.

 

 

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Now 75, Jane Fonda looks back — and ahead

Now 75, Jane Fonda looks back — and ahead | Longevity science | Scoop.it
An interview on aging and life with actress Jane Fonda, who is now 75 years old.
Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Exercise is the biggest enabler for older adults. With fitness comes independence and vitality.

 

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Too much food can kill you? Overeating and obesity now a bigger global problem than lack of food

Too much food can kill you? Overeating and obesity now a bigger global problem than lack of food | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Chronic diseases linked to obesity and overconsumption of food are now a bigger global healthcare burden than illness and disease caused by malnutrition, according to the most comprehensive disease report ever produced on global health issues.
Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Moderate caloric restriction (reduce your daily caloric intake by 10-20%) can have numerous health benefits. Start by finding your target calorie intake to maintain an optimal weight. If you can stick to that daily level, reduce it by 10%.

 

Fasting is also beneficial. The easiest way? Stop eating at 6-7pm and don't eat again until 6-7am. With minimal effort, you have a 12 hour fast. Plus, you will sleep easier if your digestive system is at rest.

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tiana cherie burne's curator insight, November 3, 2014 11:30 PM

 

For the first time ever, diseases associated with obesity are now more of a global health burden the lack of nutrition. This investigation has been going for 5 years with over 50 scientists exploring the deep issues of obesity. I believe it's a personal decision too eat badly, don't do enough physical activity, drink to much, smoke to many cigars and just don't look after your body the way were meant to. Rising numbers of obesity has been increased with young adults over the years. The biggest global risks effecting people is high blood rate, which is also the biggest neglected global health in most countries.

These scientists thankfully have put out antidotes that have helped save many millions of kids and adults from obesity. We really need more help like this in society, we need to team up and help out each other, were all human no one is special so don't be afraid to ask for help.

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To stay fit during holidays bend, don't break routine: experts

To stay fit during holidays bend, don't break routine: experts | Longevity science | Scoop.it
NEW YORK (Reuters) - Sticking to a fitness routine is not always easy, but holiday feasting, drinking and family can make it even harder.‘Tis the season, experts say, to bend your fitness routine so it...
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U.S. study quantifies the effects of exercise on life expectancy

U.S. study quantifies the effects of exercise on life expectancy | Longevity science | Scoop.it

How much life do you get from exercise?

 

To sum it up, the more you do it, the longer you live. For example, 75 minutes of brisk walking per week equates to an extra 1.8 years of life expectancy as opposed to staying sedentary. Increase that to 150–299 minutes of brisk walking per week and the gain in life expectancy goes up to 3.4 years. Make it 450 minutes per week and the estimated life expectancy jumps by 4.5 years.

 

The study also found that people whose weight is above the recommended level still benefit from physical activity .

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Why American men die young; heal a sedentary body by breaking the ‘seated cycle’

Why American men die young; heal a sedentary body by breaking the ‘seated cycle’ | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Washington Post | November 12, 2012

 

A 'seated lifestyle' has associated with everything from increased cancer risk to shorter life expectancy, and it’s costing Americans an arm and a leg — and a back.

 

At least $50 billion is spent each year to treat lower back pain, the fall issue of NYU Physician says. “Lumbar spine issues are starting to explode as people sit in a chair all day,” physician Wayne Stokes told the magazine. “We try to get across the idea that if the body doesn’t move, it’s not going to work.”

 

According to the magazine, chronic back pain isn’t caused so much by acute injury as by muscles that have become weak or imbalanced from disuse

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Vitamin D pills may boost muscle power for overweight people

Vitamin D pills may boost muscle power for overweight people | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Supplementing a resistance training regime with daily doses of vitamin D may improve muscle power and help shed inches from the waistline of overweight and obese people, says a new study.
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People who walk a lot have lower risk of diabetes

Among people with low physical activity and a high risk of diabetes, those who walk more throughout the day are less likely to actually get the blood sugar disorder, according to new research.

 

The study, published in the journal Diabetes Care, is part of a growing body of evidence that for people who get very little exercise, "even small amounts of activity will provide a really good return on their investment,"

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Elevated levels of human hormone motivates mice to exercise

Elevated levels of human hormone motivates mice to exercise | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A team of Swiss researchers has discovered that raising the levels of the hormone erythropoietin (Epo) in the brains of mice resulted in the rodents being more motivated to exercise.

 

The discovery provides the possibility of developing a pill that can motivate people to want to exercise.

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Small Alteration in Lifestyles Reduces Risk of Stroke

Small Alteration in Lifestyles Reduces Risk of Stroke | Longevity science | Scoop.it
One point increase in better score was linked to 8 percent lower risk of stroke. Those with optimum scores had a 48 percent less stroke and the risk factor dropped to 27 percent with average scores.
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Lifelong exercise can help you maintain speed and fitness as you age

Lifelong exercise can help you maintain speed and fitness as you age | Longevity science | Scoop.it

It’s inevitable: As you get older, you slow down. A 40-year-old runs more slowly than a 20-year-old. A 70-year-old can’t be expected to keep up with a 50-year-old on a bike or a hike. It’s only natural.

Well, no, it’s not.

 

 

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Interval training can boost exercise effects while reducing a workout’s length

Interval training can boost exercise effects while reducing a workout’s length | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Want to cut the length of your workout while maintaining or even increasing the benefits? Try interval training, a type of cardiovascular workout in which you alternate bursts of peppier exercise with slower-paced recovery periods.

 

Intervals make you work more efficiently: Your overall intensity is greater, so the length of your workout can be cut by about 20 percent. Plus, a growing body of evidence suggests that this approach yields health benefits comparable or superior to traditional exercise.

 

 

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Caleb's comment, April 10, 2013 5:28 PM
Great way to being able to incorporate workouts into someones schedule while at the same time not taking too much time so as to allow more time for other things.
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Active Desk lets you burn calories while checking your email

Active Desk lets you burn calories while checking your email | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Many of us sit at a desk for extended periods each day – and that has doctors worried. Researchers are beginning to understand the associated health risks triggered by sitting for long durations, and suggest that people need to stand up, walk, and generally be more active throughout their day.

 

One way to get more exercise might be to try out the Active Desk, which combines a recumbent exercise bike with a work desk, allowing you to leisurely pedal off the pounds throughout the day.

 

 

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Amiigo smart fitness bracelet identifies more than 100 exercises

Amiigo smart fitness bracelet identifies more than 100 exercises | Longevity science | Scoop.it

There are quite a few wearable sensors designed to provide some high tech help getting fit, such as larklife and Fitbit. But a team of designers from Salt Lake City in the U.S. is convinced there’s room for their Amiigo, a fitness bracelet project currently going the crowdfunding route. Considering how fast the project has attracted support it seems that, yes, there is room for another player in this niche.

 

 

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Exercise May Add Years of Life

Exercise May Add Years of Life | Longevity science | Scoop.it

“Exercise can partially reverse the effects of the aging process ... a minimum quantity and quality of exercise decreases the risk of death, prevents development of certain cancers, lowers the risk of osteoporosis, and increases longevity.” (Gremeaux V et al. 2012)

 Now, a data analysis from Canada pinpoints the lifespan extension different groups can expect from regular, moderate exercise. 

 

 

Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Again and again, exercise is proven to help increase life expectancy. More importantly, staying active will extend your quality life span, because you will remain healthier and retain vibrancy as you age.

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Walking linked to fewer strokes in women

Walking linked to fewer strokes in women | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Women who walk at least three hours every week are less likely to suffer a stroke than women who walk less or not at all, according to new research from Spain.

 

"The message for the general population remains similar: regularly engaging in moderate recreational activity is good for your health," lead author José María Huerta of the Murcia Regional Health Authority in Spain told Reuters Health.

 

 

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Holiday fitness gifts trend from high-tech to basic

Holiday fitness gifts trend from high-tech to basic | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Looking for the perfect holiday present for a fitness fan? Gift offerings this year range from apps that can store a run in the country to be viewed later to gadgets so sophisticated they measure quality of sleep as well as calories burned.

 

There is also the revival of the humble foam roller, which experts say, like old-time push-ups, squats and planks, has never been more popular.

 

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Walking, cycling may ease cancer-related fatigue: study

The long-lasting tiredness of cancer patients has been blamed both on the cancer itself, including cancer-related pain, and on the effects of treatments such as chemotherapy. Prior studies point to talk therapy, nutrition counseling and acupuncture as possible remedies.

 

But light-to-moderate exercise has the advantage of being something people can do on their own time, for little or no cost, said the researchers, whose findings appeared in The Cochrane Library.

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A 5K that you don’t need to train for, but a sense of humor is required: 32 before 32

A 5K that you don’t need to train for, but a sense of humor is required: 32 before 32 | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Glow in the dark 5Ks, moonlight bike rides and maybe, one day, rock climbing are the kind of fitness alternatives I’m finding myself drawn to. Exercise shouldn’t feel like a chore, and with options like these it sure as heck hasn’t been.

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"Exercise" shown to improve the performance of lab-grown muscle implants

"Exercise" shown to improve the performance of lab-grown muscle implants | Longevity science | Scoop.it

We all know that you need to exercise if you want to develop your muscles. As it turns out, however, exercise also makes lab-grown muscle implants more effective when introduced to the body.

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How Fit is Your City?

How Fit is Your City? | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Fitness is often a combination of personal choice and environmental support, experts say, and a ranking of the 50 healthiest U.S. cities seems to reinforce the theory.


High rates of physical activity helped to propel Minneapolis-St. Paul to the top of the list of the American College of Sports Medicine's 2012 American Fitness Index (AFI) for the second year in a row, while raised obesity levels and smoking pushed Oklahoma City to the bottom.

 

"When I say Minneapolis ranked No. 1, people give me an 'are you kidding me' kind of look," said Walter  

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