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Another Alzheimer’s Drug Fails, Disease Still Confounds Researchers

Another Alzheimer’s Drug Fails, Disease Still Confounds Researchers | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Humans are living longer, but for many, longevity doesn’t equal quality of life. Increasingly, the final years are marked by a steady cognitive decline where memory and personality are swallowed in dementia. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is on the rise, and there is no treatment. Worse, researchers and drug companies wrestling with the disease seem to have hit a wall.

 

Most recently, Baxter announced its Alzheimer’s treatment, Gammagard, proved ineffective at its twin goals of reducing cognitive decline and preserving cognitive abilities in a 490-patient Phase III trial. Although the trial showed some positive results in participants genetically predisposed to the disease, Baxter will discontinue current immunoglobulin studies in Alzheimer’s.

 

 

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Want To Have A Better Memory? Study Shows Sounds During Sleep Can Help

If you’re not willing to send electrical shocks through your brain – “mild” as they might be – to become smarter, here’s a much gentler option: play sounds while you sleep.

 

Researchers have found that “carefully timed” sounds, like the rise and fall of waves washing against the shore, can help people remember things that they learned the previous day.

 

 

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Why exercise slows memory loss in Alzheimer’s

Why exercise slows memory loss in Alzheimer’s | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A stress hormone produced during moderate exercise may protect the brain from memory changes related to Alzheimer’s disease

Via Dimitris Agorastos, Christina Mediate
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Natalie Stewart's curator insight, January 28, 2013 3:46 PM

A research team, led by Marie-Christine Pardon in the School of Biomedical Sciences, discovered that the stress hormone CRF—or corticotrophin-releasing factor—may have a protective effect on the brain from the memory changes brought on by Alzheimer’s disease.
CRF is most associated with producing stress and is found in high levels in people experiencing some forms of anxiety and depressive diseases. Normal levels of CRF, however, are beneficial to the brain, keeping the mental faculties sharp and aiding the survival of nerve cells.
 

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Blocking this molecule in the brain could prevent age-related cognitive decline | KurzweilAI

Researchers have discovered a molecule that accumulates with age and inhibits the formation of new neurons. The finding might help scientists design therapies to prevent age-related cognitive decline.

 

 

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Alzheimer's to triple by 2050 as baby boomers age

The number of U.S. residents aged 65 and older living with Alzheimer's disease is expected to nearly triple to 13.8 million by 2050 as aging baby boomers swell the ranks of those living with the brain-wasting disease, U.S. researchers said on Wednesday.

 

 

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Greg Wurn's comment, February 8, 2013 1:40 PM
one of the reason they are feeding flouride to the population, kill them with cancer before they get Alzhimers
Christina Mediate's comment, February 24, 2013 5:13 PM
I've read that there was hope to have a cure for Alzheimer's by 2025 several times throughout my research. However, this article is saying that the efforts of the Obama Administration to help find this cure, could be unsuccessful due to cutting costs. It's already to late for my grandmother seeing as how she has been living with this disease for about 15 years and is now 86 years old.
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Hearing loss may speed decline in cognitive abilities, a study shows

Hearing loss may speed decline in cognitive abilities, a study shows | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Those who were hearing-impaired were 24 percent more likely to have cognitive problems than were people with normal hearing. Also, cognitive abilities declined 32 to 41 percent more quickly in those with hearing impairment than in the others. People with hearing impairment developed problems with thinking and memory skills about three years sooner than the others did.

 

 

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Promising compound restores memory loss and reverses symptoms of Alzheimer’s | KurzweilAI

Promising compound restores memory loss and reverses symptoms of Alzheimer’s | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

New research in the FASEB Journal by NIH scientists suggests that a small molecule called TFP5 rescues plaques and tangles by blocking an overactive brain signal, thereby restoring memory in mice with Alzheimer’s — without obvious toxic side effects.

 

“We hope that clinical trial studies in AD patients yield an extended and a better quality of life, as observed in mice upon TFP5 treatment,” said Harish C. Pant, Ph.D., a senior researcher involved in the work from the Laboratory of Neurochemistry at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders at Stroke at the National Institutes of Health.

 

 

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Synaptic electronic circuits that learn and forget like neural processes | KurzweilAI

Synaptic electronic circuits that learn and forget like neural processes | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Rui Yang, Kazuya Terabe and colleagues at the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), and the International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA) in Japan and at the California NanoSystems Institute/UCLA have developed “nanoionic” (processes connected with fast ion transport in all-solid-state nanoscale systems) devices capable of a broad range of neuromorphic and electrical functions.

 

 

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PredictAD software promises early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s

PredictAD software promises early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists at VTT Technical Research Centre in Finland have developed new software called PredictAD that could significantly boost the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

 

The comparative software contrasts patient’s measurements with those of other patients kept in large databases, then visualizes the status of the patient with an index and graphics.

 

The support system and imaging methods were developed by VTT and Imperial College London.

 

The researchers used material compiled in the U.S. by the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative based on the records of 288 patients with memory problems. Nearly half of them, or 140 individuals, were diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease on average 21 months after the initial measurements, which is about the same as the current European average of 20 months.

 

 

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Pacemaker-like device being trialled as Alzheimer's treatment

Pacemaker-like device being trialled as Alzheimer's treatment | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers are investigating the use of pacemaker-like devices for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.
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The process of deep brain stimulation involves using a pacemaker-like implanted device to apply controlled mild electrical pulses to specific areas of the brain. In recent studies, it has been used – with some success – to treat conditions such as Parkinson's disease, major depression and Tourette syndrome. Now, in the ADvance Study, researchers at several research centers are exploring its use in restoring memory function to people with Alzheimer’s disease.

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Omega-3 may delay metabolic malady and block mental declines: Study

Omega-3 may delay metabolic malady and block mental declines: Study | Longevity science | Scoop.it

There is a large body of evidence to suggest that omega-3s are beneficial for brain health and heart health. A new study evaluated omega-3 supplements and their effect on cognitive performance. The findings supported established health benefits of these supplements.

 

The researchers concluded that supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) could postpone the onset of metabolic disorders and associated declines in cognitive functioning.

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Scientists successfully treat Alzheimer’s symptoms in mice

Scientists successfully treat Alzheimer’s symptoms in mice | Longevity science | Scoop.it

By turning off an immune system transmitter in mice with an Alzheimer’s-like condition, scientists have been able to greatly reduce the accumulation of an abnormal protein known as amyloid-ß in the animals’ brains.

 

Previous studies have shown that the protein plays a central role in Alzheimer’s disease. It is hoped that the research may ultimately point the way towards a method of preventing or treating the disease in humans.

 

 

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IBM supercomputer used to simulate a typical human brain

IBM supercomputer used to simulate a typical human brain | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The human brain, arguably the most complex object in the known universe, is a truly remarkable power-saver: it can simultaneously gather thousands of sensory inputs, interpret them in real time as a whole and react appropriately, abstracting, learning, planning and inventing, all on a strict power budget of about 20 W. A computer of comparable complexity that uses current technology, according to IBM's own estimates, would drain about 100 MW of power.

 

Clearly, such power consumption would be highly impractical. The problem, then, begs for an entirely new approach. IBM's answer is cognitive computing, a newly coined discipline that combines the latest discoveries in the field of neuroscience, nanotechnology and supercomputing.

 

Neuroscience has taught us that the brain consumes little power mainly because it is "event-driven." In simple terms this means that individual neurons, synapses and axons only consume power as they are activated – e.g. by an external sensory input or other neurons – and consume no power otherwise. This is however not the case with today's computers, which, in comparison, are huge power wasters.

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Video game sharpens seniors' cognitive skills

Video game sharpens seniors' cognitive skills | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists from the University of Iowa are now claiming that by playing a specific video game, test subjects aged 50 and over were able to stop and even reverse the trend.

 

In fact, those that played a particular game showed as much as seven year's worth of cognitive improvement when retested one year after the study.

 

 

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Scientists Inject Human Brain Cells Into Mice, Make Them Smarter

Scientists Inject Human Brain Cells Into Mice, Make Them Smarter | Longevity science | Scoop.it

In an experiment that might seem like something only a mad scientist would conjure, researchers injected human brain cells into the brains of mice to see how it would affect the way the mice thought. It did: the mice got smarter.

 

But the cognition boosting cells weren’t neurons...

 

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How the brain quickly rebounds from injuries | KurzweilAI

How the brain quickly rebounds from injuries | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists at Carnegie Mellon University‘s Center for Cognitive Brain Imaging (CCBI) have used a new combination of neural imaging methods to discover exactly how the human brain adapts to injury.

 

When one brain area loses functionality, a “back-up” team of secondary brain areas immediately activates, replacing not only the unavailable area but also its confederates (connected areas), the research shows

 

 

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Treatment to prevent Alzheimer’s disease moves a step closer | KurzweilAI

A new drug designed to prevent the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease could enter clinical trials in a few years’  time, according to scientists.

Alzheimer’s disease begins when a protein called amyloid-β (Aβ) starts to clump together in senile plaques in the brain, damaging nerve cells and leading to memory loss and confusion.

 

 

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Christina Mediate's comment, February 24, 2013 5:56 PM
Being able to stop the formation of senile plaques makes this drug look promising. Those plaques are what cause the damage to the brain cells and start the initial memory loss. I'm anxious to see how it works on humans though. Right now it's only safe on the mice. But this is a very crucial step towards a possible new treatment or cure for the disease.
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U.S. researchers map emotional intelligence of the brain

U.S. researchers map emotional intelligence of the brain | Longevity science | Scoop.it

We tend to think of reason and emotion as being two different things, but it turns out that there may not be a choice between the heart and the head. A University of Illinois team, led by neuroscience professor Aron Barbey, has made the first detailed 3D map of emotional and general intelligence in the brain, that shows a strong overlap of general and emotional intelligence.

 

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A major step toward an Alzheimer’s treatment and vaccine | KurzweilAI

A major step toward an Alzheimer’s treatment and vaccine | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A way to stimulate the brain’s natural defense mechanisms in people with Alzheimer’s disease has been discovered by researchers at Université Laval, CHU de Québec and pharmaceutical firm GlaxoSmithKline (GSK): a molecule known as MPL (monophosphoryl lipid A) that stimulates the activity of the brain’s immune cells.

The breakthrough opens the door to developing a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease and a vaccine to prevent the illness.

 

 

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Brain scan can sort dementia by type

Brain scan can sort dementia by type | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists say they have found a way to distinguish between different types of dementia without the need for invasive tests, like a lumbar puncture.

 

US experts could accurately identify Alzheimer's disease and another type of dementia from structural brain patterns on medical scans, Neurology reports.

Currently, doctors can struggle to diagnose dementia, meaning the most appropriate treatment may be delayed.

 

More invasive tests can help, but are unpleasant for the patient.

 

 

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Psychiatric News Alert: Inflammation Biomarker Linked to Depression

Psychiatric News Alert: Inflammation Biomarker Linked to Depression | Longevity science | Scoop.it
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Elevated levels in a common blood test used to measure inflammation are associated with increased risk for psychological distress and depression, according to Danish researchers writing online December 24 in Archives of General Psychiatry. Their study looked at the medical records of 73,131 people in Copenhagen. Odds ratios of distress, use of antidepressants, and hospitalization for depression were about double that of the general population for people with CRP levels above the standard cutoff of 10 mg/L.

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Toxic interaction in neurons that leads to dementia and ALS | KurzweilAI

Toxic interaction in neurons that leads to dementia and ALS | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida have uncovered a toxic cellular process by which a protein that maintains the health of neurons becomes deficient and can lead to dementia.

The findings shed new light on the link between culprits implicated in two devastating neurological diseases: Alzheimer’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, which afflicts physicist Stephen Hawking.

There is no cure for frontotemporal dementia, a disorder that affects personality, behavior and language and is second only to Alzheimer’s disease as the most common form of early-onset dementia.
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Johns Hopkins surgeons implant first brain ‘pacemaker’ for Alzheimer’s disease in US | KurzweilAI

Johns Hopkins surgeons implant first brain ‘pacemaker’ for Alzheimer’s disease in US | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have surgically implanted a pacemaker-like device into the brain of a patient in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease, the first such operation in the United States.

 

The device, which provides deep brain stimulation and has been used in thousands of people with Parkinson’s disease, is seen as a possible means of boosting memory and reversing cognitive decline.

 

 

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Studies of gene regulation in brain development may lead to new treatment of mental disorders | KurzweilAI

Studies of gene regulation in brain development may lead to new treatment of mental disorders | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A team of researchers at the University of California, San Diego and the Institut Pasteur, Paris has come up with a novel way to describe brain development.

 

The findings could lead to new drug designs for mental disorders such as autism-spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia.

 

 

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Imaging brain structures that deteriorate in Parkinson’s | KurzweilAI

A new imaging technique developed at MIT offers the first glimpse of the degeneration of two brain structures affected by Parkinson’s disease.

 

The technique, which combines several types of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), could allow doctors to better monitor patients’ progression and track the effectiveness of potential new treatments, says Suzanne Corkin, MIT professor emerita of neuroscience and leader of the research team.

 

 

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