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FDA To Decide Whether Antibacterial Soap Is Safe – After Four Decades

FDA To Decide Whether Antibacterial Soap Is Safe – After Four Decades | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Antibacterial soap has been around for 40 years. But research now shows that the active ingredient in the soap, triclosan, alters hormonal balance in animals, is possibly harmful to the immune system, and possibly contributes to the rise of antibiotic resistant germs.
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Triclosan, which kills both bacteria and fungus, is found in about 75 percent of antibacterial products. In addition to soaps, it’s found in deodorants and toothpaste and mouthwashes where it helps prevent gingivitis, and it’s infused in various household products such as garbage bags, kitchen utensils, furniture, clothing, toys, and some cosmetics.

 

 

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Superbug-killing coating "magnetically" draws in bacteria

Superbug-killing coating "magnetically" draws in bacteria | Longevity science | Scoop.it

"Scientists at Singapore's Nanyang Technological University (NTU) have created a "magnetic-like" coating that traps and destroys 99 percent of the bacteria and fungi that it encounters.

 

The antibacterial coating has been shown to be effective against superbugs like Staphylococcus aureus and is already being used...

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Scientists develop "eco-friendly" antibacterial material

Scientists develop "eco-friendly" antibacterial material | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Because they’re known for being effective killers of bacteria, silver nanoparticles have been finding their way into a wide variety of antimicrobial materials. There are concerns, however, regarding the consequences of those nanoparticles being shed by the material and entering the environment.

 

Now, researchers from Sweden’s KTH Royal Institute of Technology have announced the development of a new type of antibacterial material, made from cellulose and polymers.

 

 

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