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Gene Therapy Turns Several Leukemia Patients Cancer Free. Will It Work for Other Cancers, Too?

Gene Therapy Turns Several Leukemia Patients Cancer Free. Will It Work for Other Cancers, Too? | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A new cancer treatment pioneered at the University of Pennsylvania has generated a lot of excitement in the field in addition to a handful of breathless media reports. Called targeted cellular therapy, the approach has given several dozen patients what Laurence Cooper of the MD Anderson Cancer Center called “a Lazarus moment.”

 

The patients all suffered from lymphocytic leukemia and had exhausted other treatment options. The researchers, Carl June and David Porter, announced the results recently at the American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition in New Orleans.

 

“Those patients were facing certain death,” said Cooper, who wasn’t involved in the Penn study but is researching a similar treatment at MD Anderson.

 

 

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Credit Card-Sized Chip Diagnoses HIV and Provides T Cell Counts on the Spot

Credit Card-Sized Chip Diagnoses HIV and Provides T Cell Counts on the Spot | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Advances in microfluidics are driving the invention of many portable medical testing devices. A portable HIV diagnostic test was shown to work in a 2011 study, but, unlike the new chip, it didn’t also provide T cell counts.

 

The device used in the study was tabletop rather than hand-held, but the researchers are confident that it could be shrunk to the size of a toaster or smaller.

 

 

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The paradox of chronic infections

The paradox of chronic infections | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Microbiologist Kim Lewis on chronic relapsing infections, persister cells, and Metronidazole
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Turning off the ‘aging genes’ | KurzweilAI

Turning off the ‘aging genes’ | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Tel Aviv University researchers have developed a computer algorithm that predicts which genes can be “turned off” to create the same anti-aging effect as calorie restriction*. The findings, reported in Nature Communications, could lead to the development of new drugs to treat aging.

 

“Most algorithms try to find drug targets that kill cells to treat cancer or bacterial infections,” says Keren Yizhak, a doctoral student in Prof. Eytan Ruppin’s laboratory. “Our algorithm is the first in our field to look for drug targets not to kill cells, but to transform them from a diseased state into a healthy one.”

 

 

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Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, January 4, 2014 3:13 PM

Want to stay forever young? Turn off your aging genes

Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, January 6, 2014 12:33 PM

DO YOU WANT TO LIVE FOREVER? 

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Vitamin E may slow early Alzheimer's decline: study

Taking vitamin E during the early stages of Alzheimer's disease slowed declines in patients' ability to perform basic tasks by about six months in a new study.

 

 

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Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, January 3, 2014 1:44 PM

VItamin E for Alzheimers-no known side effects observed to date

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Ultrathin ‘diagnostic skin’ allows continuous patient monitoring | KurzweilAI

Ultrathin ‘diagnostic skin’ allows continuous patient monitoring | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

An entirely new approach to measuring body temperature — an ”electronic skin” that adheres non-invasively to human skin, conforms well to contours, and provides a detailed temperature map of any surface of the body — has been developed by an international multidisciplinary team including researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB).

 

 

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"Mini-kidney" grown from stem cells

"Mini-kidney" grown from stem cells | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Instead of having to wait for one of the limited number of available donor kidneys, patients in need of a transplant may eventually be able to have a new kidney custom-grown for them. That possibility recently took one step closer to reality, as scientists at Australia's University of Queensland successfully grew a "mini-kidney" from stem cells.

 

The researchers created a proprietary new protocol, that prompts stem cells in a petri dish to self-organize into a miniature kidney. "During self-organization, different types of cells arrange themselves with respect to each other to create the complex structures that exist within an organ, in this case, the kidney," says project leader Prof. Melissa Little.

 

 

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Multivitamin and mineral use and breast cancer mortality in older women with invasive breast cancer in the women’s health initiative - Springer

Multivitamin and mineral use and breast cancer mortality in older women with invasive breast cancer in the women’s health initiative - Springer | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Postmenopausal women with invasive breast cancer using MVM (multi-vitamins with minerals) had lower breast cancer mortality than non-users. The results suggest a possible role for daily MVM use in attenuating breast cancer mortality in women with invasive breast cancer but the findings require confirmation.

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Sue Tamani's curator insight, December 30, 2013 8:26 PM

I love anything from Ray and Terry - they are in the forefront of anti aging research.

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Carmat self-regulating artificial heart implanted in first human subject

Carmat self-regulating artificial heart implanted in first human subject | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Last Wednesday in Paris, a 75 year-old man received an artificial heart. That in itself might not be newsworthy, as such devices have been in use since the early 80s. In this case, however, the gadget in question was the first Carmat bioprosthetic artificial heart to ever be implanted in a human. According to its inventor, cardiac surgeon Alain Carpentier, it's the world's first self-regulating artificial heart.

 

When Carpentier uses the term "self-regulating," he refers to the Carmat's ability to speed up or slow down its flow rate based on the patient’s physiological needs – if they're performing a vigorous physical activity, for instance, the heart will respond by beating faster. This is made possible via "multiple miniature embedded sensors" and proprietary algorithms running on its integrated microprocessor.

 

Most other artificial hearts, by contrast, beat at a constant unchanging rate. This means that patients either have to avoid too much activity, or risk becoming breathless and exhausted quickly.

 

 

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Ray Kurzweil: This is your future

Ray Kurzweil: This is your future | Longevity science | Scoop.it

By the early 2020s, we will have the means to program our biology away from disease and aging.


Up until recently, health and medicine was basically a hit or miss affair. We would discover interventions such as drugs that had benefits, but also many side effects. Until recently, we did not have the means to actually design interventions on computers.

 

All of that has now changed, and will dramatically change clinical practice by the early 2020s.

 

 

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Portable scanner designed to make eye exams quicker and easier

Portable scanner designed to make eye exams quicker and easier | Longevity science | Scoop.it

If you're like a lot of people, you don't make an annual trip to the ophthalmologist to get your eyes checked ... and you really ought to, in order to catch any problems before it's too late. If it were possible to get them checked at a regular doctor's office or clinic, though, perhaps you might do so more often. That's one of the reasons that a team at MIT have designed a new hand-held retinal scanner, that can quickly and easily be used anywhere.

 

Ordinarily, eye exams are carried out using relatively large instruments that are permanently located in an optometrist or ophthalmologist's office. The portable prototype MIT device, by contrast, is about the size of a consumer camcorder. It can "read" a patient's eye in seconds, using a single measurement to look for conditions such as diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and macular degeneration.

 

 

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Delicate Eye Cells Are Latest to Be 3D-Printed

Delicate Eye Cells Are Latest to Be 3D-Printed | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Blindness might just be the first major disability to disappear, at least if our high-tech future takes more a utopian than dystopian bent. A bionic eye is already on the market in the United States, and stem cell therapy has been shown to restore sight in mice. Now British scientists have successfully printed retinal cells.

 

Researchers have used 3D printing — an essential part of the effort to produce viable tissue and organs to replace what is damaged — with body cells before, but the process is more successful with some types of cells than others.

 

 

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Ask Ray | Supplement study quoted in The Wall Street Journal is misleading | KurzweilAI

Ask Ray | Supplement study quoted in The Wall Street Journal is misleading | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

 

Dear readers, I read this recent article: The Wall Street Journal | Multivitamins found to have little benefit --- no effect seen in preventing cognitive

 

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Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, December 24, 2013 11:15 AM

GMO foods do not provide the vitamins and minerals we need to be healthy which is why we need supplements. 

Paul Joseph Smith's curator insight, December 30, 2013 11:11 PM

Kurzwell

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Can an apple a day keep the doctor (and statins) away?

Can an apple a day keep the doctor (and statins) away? | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The old proverb may stand the test of time, according to new research that suggests consuming an apple a day has the same benefits as statin drugs for people over 50.
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Growing human organs inside pigs in Japan | KurzweilAI

Growing human organs inside pigs in Japan | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Meiji University professor Hiroshi Nagashima is creating chimeric pigs, which carry genetic material from two different species, BBC News reports. It starts off by making what Nagashima calls “a-pancreatic” embryos. Inside the white pig embryo, the gene that carries the instructions for developing the animal’s pancreas has been “switched off.”

 

The Japanese team then introduces stem cells from a black pig into the embryo. What they have discovered is that as the pig develops, it will be normal except for its pancreas, which will be genetically a black pig’s.

 

In a lab at Tokyo University, Professor Hiro Nakauchi is taking the next step. He takes skin cells from an adult brown rat. He then uses gene manipulation to change these adult skin cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) cells, which can develop into any part of the animal’s body.

 

 

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Cholesterol linked to Alzheimer's protein, unclear why

Cholesterol linked to Alzheimer's protein, unclear why | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Patterns of "good" and "bad" cholesterol usually associated with heart risks also predicted the levels of Alzheimer's-related beta amyloid protein seen in the brains of study participants.

 

"One of the important themes emerging from dementia research over the past 15 years is that there are intriguing connections between vascular disease and Alzheimer's disease," Bruce Reed, who led the research, told Reuters Health by email.

 

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Heart disease could be tied to dementia for older women

Heart disease could be tied to dementia for older women | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Older women with a history of heart trouble were more likely to develop thinking and memory problems than those without heart disease, it was found in a new study.

 

Women who'd had a heart attack, in particular, were twice as likely to see declines in their thinking and memory skills, researchers found.

Doctors had already suspected such a link existed, lead author Dr. Bernhard Haring told Reuters Health.

 

"But our study provides new evidence on a broad scale including many different types of heart disease with a specific focus on postmenopausal women," he said.

 

 

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Top Science: NutraIngredients reveals top 10 science stories of 2013

Top Science: NutraIngredients reveals top 10 science stories of 2013 | Longevity science | Scoop.it
From the fallout over a controversial omega-3 link to cancer, to links between gut microbes and autism, and so much in between - it’s been a busy year for research in the functional food and nutrition arena...
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Antioxidants in diet linked to cataract risk

Women who eat foods rich in antioxidants may have a lower risk of cataracts as they age, according to a new Swedish analysis.

"Oxidative damage of the eye lens caused by free radicals has been suggested to be crucial in development of cataract," said Susanne Rautiainen of the Institute of Environmental Medicine at the Karolinska Institutet, who led the study.

 

Her team looked at the diets of more than 30,000 middle aged and older women, and found those with the highest total intake of antioxidants had about a 13 percent lower risk of developing cataracts than women who consumed the least.

 

 

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Progress in Efforts to Develop Lab-Grown Lungs: Functional Cells

Progress in Efforts to Develop Lab-Grown Lungs: Functional Cells | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Since the development of induced pluripotent stem cellsin 2006, scientists have managed to use the manufactured stem cells like seeds to grow a wide range of tissues and rudimentary organs. These advances have generated a lot of excitement about future applications — specifically, the potential to grow new organs for patients rather than requiring them to wait for a transplant.

 

It’s an exciting endpoint, but there are still major hurdles to clear before we get there. Different tissue types have not proven equal, and researchers are still struggling to coax stem cells to take on certain roles, including workhorses like lung cells. But Columbia University researchers recently managed to develop functional lung and airway cells from human iPSCs.

 

In work published in Nature Biotechnology, the researchers developed six types of lung and airway cells and documented evidence of basic functionality.

 

 

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Genomic Studies Sift Centenarian DNA for Genes Protecting Against Age-Related Diseases

Genomic Studies Sift Centenarian DNA for Genes Protecting Against Age-Related Diseases | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Occasionally, you hear tell of a hale hundred-year-old who drank and smoked her way through life—or the reverse, a health nut who tragically fell prey to a killer disease at 40.
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Researchers, Startups Hope One Drop of Blood Could Diagnose All Types of Cancer

Researchers, Startups Hope One Drop of Blood Could Diagnose All Types of Cancer | Longevity science | Scoop.it

As genetics reveals the incredible diversity among cancer cells, researchers have largely given up pursuing a silver bullet to cure all types of cancer. Instead, many have begun searching for the next-best thing: a silver bullet test to diagnose all cancers. The test would look for markers of cancer in the patient’s blood, where the process of tumor-making leaves a trail that can often be picked up before tumors are big enough to spot.

 

And early diagnosis makes a big difference in survival rates. When cancer is found in Stage 0, as it’s just getting started, or in Stage 1, it kills only 10 percent of patients, regardless of what type of cancer it is, for the most part. Many of the cancers we know as the deadliest are so known because they are rarely found in earlier stages.

 

 

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Sue Tamani's curator insight, December 30, 2013 8:27 PM

amazing research here

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Edible Batteries Could Power a Range of Smart Pills and Medical Devices

Edible Batteries Could Power a Range of Smart Pills and Medical Devices | Longevity science | Scoop.it

How can we safely power electronic technology inside the body? A number of researchers are aggressively seeking answers to that question. For instance, Singularity Hub has covered an electronic pill that, when activated by stomach acid, generates enough power to signal an external device that then registers that the pill has been taken.

 

 

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Wear takes a fashionable approach to hearing aids

Wear takes a fashionable approach to hearing aids | Longevity science | Scoop.it

From hiding hearing aids in your mouth to having them built-in to the arms of your glasses, we have seen some innovative efforts to assist those with hearing difficulties in recent years. With these unobtrusive technologies available, you might think that wearing a hearing aid around your neck would be the least desirable of options. Yet the team behind Wear believe that by favoring comfort and aesthetics over discretion, it may have conceived a viable alternative.

 

Wear looks like a regular necklace, but features a built-in high-fidelity analog microphone array that is designed to capture conversations in noisy environments and filter out unwanted noise. Sound is then relayed to the ears via any pair of 3.5 mm headphones with the user able to control the volume by a knob on the device.

 

 

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Insulin "capsules" may ultimately replace daily injections for diabetics

Insulin "capsules" may ultimately replace daily injections for diabetics | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Help could be on the way for the hundreds of millions of diabetics who are tired of giving themselves daily insulin injections. Scientists from India's Nati...
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