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Training for your first 5K

Training for your first 5K | Longevity science | Scoop.it

In three months, you could run a 5K even if you have never run in your life.

 

If you are otherwise healthy, 12 weeks of training is all you need in order to make that 5K not just doable but enjoyable, says Bill Pierce, co-author of “Run Less Run Faster” and a longtime marathoner.

 

 

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Alacia Romack's curator insight, January 19, 2014 11:05 PM

This article is really helpful because it provides a lot of technique tips and practical advice on how to stay healthy through your training. It also provides advice for the day of the race and how to best prepare. 

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Nano drug crosses blood-brain tumor barrier, targets brain tumors | KurzweilAI

Nano drug crosses blood-brain tumor barrier, targets brain tumors | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

An experimental drug called SapC-DOPS, in early development for aggressive brain tumors, can cross the blood-brain barrier.

 

There, it can kill tumor cells and block the growth of tumor blood vessels, according to a study led by researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center at Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James).

 

 

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Pacific Cove's curator insight, October 24, 2013 4:12 AM

#BrainTumorThursday - “Few drugs have the capacity to cross the tumor blood-brain barrier and specifically target tumor cells,” says principal investigator Balveen Kaur, PhD, associate professor of neurological surgery and chief of the Dardinger Laboratory of Neurosciences. #BrainCancer #BrainTumor #BTSM

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Desk jobs can be killers, literally

Desk jobs can be killers, literally | Longevity science | Scoop.it

 

Workouts are no antidote to the negative effects of sitting at your desk or watching TV too long.

 

Michael Jensen, a researcher at the Mayo Clinic, is talking on the phone, but his voice is drowned out by what sounds like a vacuum cleaner. “I’m sorry,” he says. “I’m on a treadmill.”

 

David Dunstan, an Australian researcher, uses a speakerphone so he can walk around his office at the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute in Melbourne

 

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Facial blood vessel-scanning could be the next form of biometric ID

Facial blood vessel-scanning could be the next form of biometric ID | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists at India’s Jadavpur University are taking a different approach to facial ID. They’ve developed a system that can identify a person based not on the composition of their face, but on the blood vessels withinit.

 

The system starts with an infrared scan being performed on the person’s face, using a thermal imaging camera. The image that is obtained is then processed by a computer, using a specially-designed algorithm. As a result, virtually all of the veins and arteries beneath the skin (including the tiniest capillaries) can be seen in that image.

 

 

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Scientists find how 'obesity gene' makes people fat

Scientists find how 'obesity gene' makes people fat | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists have unraveled how a gene long associated with obesity makes people fat by triggering increased hunger, opening up potential new ways to fight a growing global health problem.

 

A common variation in the FTO gene affects one in six of the population, making them 70 percent more likely to become obese - but until now experts did not know why.

 

 

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GE wants to use artificial intelligence to predict the future of health care innovations

GE wants to use artificial intelligence to predict the future of health care innovations | Longevity science | Scoop.it
GE Healthcare is pushing a system called Corvix for doing agent-based simulations on complex problems. In India, the technology simulated a population of 80 million people in order to determine the best places to build medical facilities.

 

Around the world, the health care system is rife with inefficiencies, and General Electric thinks it can help solve the problem using data. Only it’s not talking about bureaucrats looking at reports: GE has built an artificial intelligence system called Corvix that uses historical data to predict the future, including everything from how diseases will spread to the cities where hospitals will be needed the most.

 

It might sound futuristic, but the techniques behind Corvix have actually been around for a while. The platform uses agent-based modeling to build, essentially, a reasonable facsimile of some sort of complex system and then simulate its evolution over time. The “agents” represent the atomic units of those systems, such as individual people in the case of human populations or perhaps cells in the case of a biological simulation. They act according to a set of rules in any given situation, which is how the models are able to keep the simulations progressing.

 

However, thanks to the advent of big data, GE Healthcare Chief Economist Mitch Higashi thinks the time is right for a platform like Corvix to provide some real value to real-world decisions. There’s enough raw computing power, machine intelligence and data-modeling expertise to start doing fast, accurate simulations over very large and complicated datasets. Also, advances in user-interface design have made these types of models more consumable: GE’s Corvix uses a game-like UI “that any 10-year-old can figure out how to use in 10 minutes,” Higashi said.

 

The first live run for Corvix happened in the state of Andhra Pradesh in India, where the system simulated a population of 80 million people in order to figure out where to build hospitals and medical training centers over the coming years. The GE team used two census datasets and one health care survey in order to build what Higashi calls “a reasonable representation of 80 million people,” as well as a map of India’s existing hospital and energy grid. Health care analysts studying the problem of where to build can drag a new hospital over an area on the map and see how the situation plays out, Higashi explained.

 

The original plan, said Chaitanya Sarawate, GE’s head of health economics and reimbursement for India, was for the Public Health Foundation of India to invest $2 billion building training institutions in different cities over the next five years. Corvix suggested some possible changes in location of those institutions, including placing two institutions in the country’s most-populous state, Uttar Pradesh, instead of just one as was originally planned. The advice is part of a report from the foundation to India’s Minstry of Health, which will make the ultimate decision.

 

Developing countries such as India are great places to use this type of technology, Higashi explained, because they are doing greenfield investing in areas such as health infrastructure and a lot of good can happen if they get it right off the bat. The problem, Sarawate noted, is that they often lack detailed data that can help governments make objective comparisons — that’s the kind of stuff a company like GE, in this case, can track down and try to feed into a model that takes into account its relative importance.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Mr. Crawford's curator insight, November 3, 2013 6:01 PM

In this article, an artificial intelliegnce named Corvix uses historical data to predict the future. It figures out how diseases will spread to the citites and where hospitals are needed the most. It's a great article to read because it explains how the Corvix impacts the world and how valuebale it is to populated areas.

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Gene therapy for metachromatic leukodystrophy corrects errors in DNA and 'cures children', clinical trial shows

Gene therapy for metachromatic leukodystrophy corrects errors in DNA and 'cures children', clinical trial shows | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A disease which robs children of the ability to walk and talk has been cured by pioneering gene therapy to correct errors in their DNA, say doctors. The study, in the journal Science, showed the three patients were now going to school. A second study published at the same time has shown a similar therapy reversing a severe genetic disease affecting the immune system.

 

Gene therapy researchers said it was a "really exciting" development.

Both diseases are caused by errors in the patient's genetic code - the manual for building and running their bodies.

 

Babies born with metachromatic leukodystrophy appear healthy, but their development starts to reverse between the ages of one and two as part of their brain is destroyed. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome leads to a defective immune system. It makes patients more susceptible to infections, cancers and the immune system can also attack other parts of the body.

 

The technique, developed by a team of researchers at the San Raffaele Scientific Institute in Milan, Italy, used a genetically modified virus to correct the damaging mutations in a patient's genes.

 

Bone marrow stem cells are taken from the patient then the virus is used to 'infect' the cells with tiny snippets of DNA which contain the correct instructions. These are then put back into the patient.

 

Three children were picked for treatment from families with a history of metachromatic leukodystrophy, but before their brain function started to decline.

 

Prof Luigi Naldini, who leads the San Raffaele Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy, said: "Three years after the start of the clinical trial the results obtained from the first six patients are very encouraging.

 

"The therapy is not only safe, but also effective and able to change the clinical history of these severe diseases.

 

"After 15 years of effort and our successes in the laboratory, but frustration as well, it's really exciting to be able to give a concrete solution to the first patients."

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Non-drug treatments for hypertension

Non-drug treatments for hypertension | Longevity science | Scoop.it

An evidence-based review looks at diet, acupuncture and other approaches. Some work, some don’t...

 

Often called a silent disease, hypertension has no symptoms beyond the readings that come from a blood pressure cuff. And yet, high blood pressure is a risk factor for a slew of other conditions, including heart attack, congestive heart failure, stroke, kidney disease and vision loss. So treating hypertension is all about lowering your risk for these diseases.

 

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How Safe And Effective Is Alternative Medicine?

How Safe And Effective Is Alternative Medicine? | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Alternative medicine -- from herbs to acupuncture to supplements -- is huge in America. Now, a prominent doctor says it's been way oversold.
Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Listen to a debate between Dr. Grossman and Dr. Offit, who believes that alternative medicine is dangerous.

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Keeping mentally busy tied to less memory loss

People who spend a lot of time reading, writing and otherwise seeking and processing new information lose their thinking and memory skills more slowly as they age, a new study suggests.

 

Researchers found being "cognitively active" both early and later in life was tied to better performance on memory tests among people in their 80s.

 

 

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Study shows iron reduction benefits cardio health | Research and Insights content from New Hope 360

Study shows iron reduction benefits cardio health | Research and Insights content from New Hope 360 | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Statin medications are known to have an effect on cellular iron. A group of researchers have compared the effects of statins on iron reduction and cholesterol levels (HDL/LDL ratio). It included patients with advanced peripheral arterial disease. Improved clinical outcomes were associated with lower iron levels but not with changes in cholesterol levels. This means that iron reduction may provide a low-cost alternative to statins for reducing inflammation associated with arterial ..

 

 

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Qardio unveils portable, wireless cardiovascular monitoring devices

Qardio unveils portable, wireless cardiovascular monitoring devices | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Thanks to the miniaturization of electronics and wireless technology, detailed cardiovascular monitoring no longer requires a visit to the doctor's clinic or a hospital. A new wave of cardiovascular monitoring devices can be carried or worn by patients as they go about their daily routine, with the collected data able to be transmitted wirelessly to healthcare professionals and family members. Healthcare company Qardio has unveiled two such devices that allow patients suffering, or at risk of developing cardiovascular conditions, to better monitor their health.

 

 

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Dance for Parkinson’s Disease: Movement as medicine

Dance for Parkinson’s Disease: Movement as medicine | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Dance has shown short-term benefits for people with Parkinson’s disease.
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Smart Diapers test chidren's urine to monitor their health over time

Smart Diapers test chidren's urine to monitor their health over time | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The Smart Diaper uses several reactive agents and an app to monitor irregularities in an infant's urine over time and alert parents if they should take thei...
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Later retirement linked to lower risk of Alzheimer's, study shows

Workers who postpone retirement are less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia known to affect the elderly than those who leave their jobs at age 60, a recent survey of nearly half a million European retirees shows.


The study looked at health and insurance records of more than 429,000 former workers in France and found that the risk of developing dementia declined with each additional year worked beyond an average retirement age, said Carole Dufouil, research director at INSERM, a French government agency in charge of the study.

 

 

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Prostate cancer hormonal therapy tied to kidney risks

Men who are treated for prostate cancer with hormone-targeted therapy have a higher risk of developing kidney problems, a new study suggests.

 

The treatment, known as androgen deprivation therapy, lowers the risk of death among men with advanced, aggressive prostate cancer

 

 

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Largest cancer gene database made public

National Cancer Institute scientists have released the largest-ever database of cancer-related genetic variations, providing researchers the most comprehensive way so far to figure out how to target treatments for the disease.


Open access worldwide to the new database, based on genome studies, is expected to help researchers accelerate development of new drugs and better match patients with therapies, NCI said in a statement on Monday

 

 

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Engineering longer lifespan for joint replacements | KurzweilAI

Engineering longer lifespan for joint replacements | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of Southampton have completed a project that will enable surgeons to fit joint replacements with longer, optimized lifespans.

 

The MXL project uses computational modelling to define the mechanics of an artificial joint — a complex interaction of individual anatomy, prosthesis design, sizing and placement — to ensure successful surgery and longer lifespans of the prosthetic joints

 

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Odoreader detects bladder cancer in urine

Odoreader detects bladder cancer in urine | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A new, non-invasive type of test could spell the beginning of a new age in bladder cancer diagnosis. Researchers at the University of Liverpool and University of the West of England in Bristol have created a device that can analyze the odors in urine to catch early signs of this type of cancer. The researchers claim the device has generated an accuracy rate of 100 percent in tests with 98 urine samples.

 

 

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Eating fruits and vegetables tied to longer life

Eating fruits and vegetables tied to longer life | Longevity science | Scoop.it
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Eating fewer than five servings of fruit and vegetables each day is linked with a higher chance of dying early, according to a large study from Sweden.People who said they
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Flexible sensor could lead to better artificial skin

Flexible sensor could lead to better artificial skin | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Using gold nanoparticles on top of a PVC substrate, researchers at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have built a new type of cheap, flexible sensor that simultaneously detects pressure, humidity and temperature with surprising accuracy. The sensor could be used to monitor cracks in bridges, create a better artificial skin to benefit amputees, or even to give robots that special "human touch."

 

 

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Stem-cell therapy wipes out HIV in two patients

Two men with HIV have been off AIDS drugs for several months after receiving stem-cell transplants for cancer that appear to have cleared the virus from their bodies, researchers reported on Wednesday.

 

Both patients, who were treated in Boston and had been on long-term drug therapy to control their HIV, received stem-cell transplants after developing lymphoma, a type of blood cancer.

 

 

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Fiber-rich grains tied to lower diabetes risk

People who eat a diet high in fiber-rich whole grains are less likely to develop diabetes or heart disease, according to a review of past studies.

 

The analysis was conducted for the American Society for Nutrition. In a position statement, the group said evidence suggests foods with cereal fiber or mixtures of whole grains and bran are "modestly associated" with a reduced disease risk.

 

 

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Red meat tied to worse colon cancer outcomes: study

People who report eating the most red and processed meat before being diagnosed with colon cancer are more likely to die during the next eight years, according to a new study.

 

"It's another important reason to follow the guidelines to limit the intake of red and processed meat," said Marjorie McCullough, the study's lead author from the American Cancer Society in Atlanta.

 

 

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3D-printed Cortex concept scratches the itch of healing broken bones

3D-printed Cortex concept scratches the itch of healing broken bones | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The only thing worse than breaking a bone is waiting for it to heal. During the healing process itself, wearing a fiberglass and plaster cast can be a stinky, itchy endeavor that is uncomfortable and inconvenient; all for an injury that is completely internal. Enter Jake Evill's Cortex concept. Beyond having an awesome last name, Jake Evill, a media design graduate of the Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, has managed to modernize the ancient concept of a splint using 3D printing technology.

 

 

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