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Soda drinking tied to kids' behavior problems: study

Soda drinking tied to kids' behavior problems: study | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Children who drink soda tend to score slightly higher on scales that measure aggressive behavior than kids who don't drink the carbonated beverages, according to a new study.

 

The study's lead author cautioned, however, that the increase may not be noticeable for individual children and the researchers can't prove soda caused the bad behaviors.

 

 

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Nanoparticles reprogram immune cells to fight cancer | KurzweilAI

Nanoparticles reprogram immune cells to fight cancer | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
In the lab, UGA scientists injected nanoparticles (NPs) into the mitochondria of cancer cells and activated the NPs with laser light to produce reactive oxygen
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A potential cure for Alzheimer’s? Scientists discover new culprit behind brain-wasting disease

A potential cure for Alzheimer’s? Scientists discover new culprit behind brain-wasting disease | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The accumulation of a specific protein in the aging brain may be the cause of numerous devastating neurodegenerative diseases – most notably Alzheimer’s disease. (RT @foxnewshealth: A potential cure for #Alzheimer’s?
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New process allows for creation of complex silicon nanostructures | KurzweilAI

New process allows for creation of complex silicon nanostructures | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
This silicon-germanium nanostructure was created using salt to absorb heat to prevent its collapse (credit: Oregon State University) Chemists at Oregon
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CTC-Based Biomarkers Can Be Measured for Sensitivity to Novel Breast Cancer Drug

CTC-Based Biomarkers Can Be Measured for Sensitivity to Novel Breast Cancer Drug | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Biomarkers for sensitivity to etirinotecan pegol that are found in circulating tumor cells of breast cancer patients can be
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Garlic reduces lung cancer risk by nearly half

Garlic reduces lung cancer risk by nearly half | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Consuming raw garlic could serve as a protective factor against lung cancer, even for smokers, suggests a new study by Chinese scientists.
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Robotic intubation device seeks out patients' airways

Robotic intubation device seeks out patients' airways | Longevity science | Scoop.it
An experimental new robotic device automatically steers an inserted breathing tube towards a patient's trachea. It promises to make the intubation process e...
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Ultrasound-emitting "band-aids" speed healing of venous ulcers

Ultrasound-emitting "band-aids" speed healing of venous ulcers | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Venous ulcers are nasty things, often found on the lower extremities of elderly or inactive people. They occur when high blood pressure causes the skin adjacent to the affected veins to break down, leaving open wounds that take months or even years to heal. Standard treatments include compression bandages, infection control and standard wound dressings, although these approaches don’t work in all cases. Now, however, scientists are getting good results using band-aid-like patches that emit ultrasound into the ulcers.

 

It’s been suspected for some time that ultrasound could have a curative effect on the ulcers, although most studies have investigated the use of fairly high frequencies – around 1 to 3 megahertz. Instead, a group of scientists from Philadelphia’s Drexel University tried using frequencies that were considerably lower.

 

 

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Chocolate may help keep brain healthy | KurzweilAI

Chocolate may help keep brain healthy | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Drinking two cups of hot chocolate a day may help older people keep their brains healthy and their thinking skills sharp, according to...
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Software upgrades to bionic eye enable color recognition, improve resolution, image focus, zooming | KurzweilAI

Software upgrades to bionic eye enable color recognition, improve resolution, image focus, zooming | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
An Argus II device implanted over the eye's macula. (Credit: UCSF) The first bionic eye to be approved for patients in the U.S. is getting software
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Cancer biomarker tests undervalued by doctors and patients, authors say - News-Medical.net

Cancer biomarker tests undervalued by doctors and patients, authors say
News-Medical.net
Doctors need a way to target treatments to patients most likely to benefit and avoid treating those who will not.

Via Brian Shields
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Brian Shields's curator insight, August 4, 2013 1:37 PM

Very interesting observations regarding the importance of biomarkers and the obstaclescreated by the current cancer research environment.  The quote below is a great summary of the current status quo preventing personalized medicine from flousishing in the U.S.:


"The regulatory process, the research funding, the reimbursement, even the standards for journal publications for tumor biomarker tests are all meager compared to the robust support for drug development, the authors say."

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Smelling Cancer: Device Detects Bladder Cancer From Odor of Urine

Smelling Cancer: Device Detects Bladder Cancer From Odor of Urine | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The smell of urine is not usually associated with having life-saving properties. But a new UK device called the ‘Odoreader’ can analyze urine odors and determine if bladder cancer (BC) is present.
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Exercise may cut endometrial cancer risk for heavy women

Overweight and obese women who get plenty of exercise may have a lower risk of endometrial cancer than if they were sedentary, according to new research.

 

Strenuous and moderate physical activity were linked to lowered risk for heavy women, but there was no association between activity level and endometrial cancer risk for thinner women, Christina M. Dieli-Conwright of the Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope in Duarte, California, and her colleagues found.

 

 

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Aspirin tied to smaller lung and colon cancer tumors

Colon and lung cancer patients who regularly took low-dose aspirin before their diagnosis tended to have less advanced tumors, in a new study.

 

Scientists already knew that aspirin was tied to a decreased risk of death for people with colon cancer, said senior author Yudi Pawitan.

 

"We showed evidence that it is also beneficial for lung cancer, and has both early and late protective effects," Pawitan, of the department of medical epidemiology and biostatistics at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, told Reuters Health.

 

 

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Bioengineered mouse heart gets a beat using human cells

Bioengineered mouse heart gets a beat using human cells | Longevity science | Scoop.it
With the goal of meeting the shortfall in donor hearts, scientists have bioengineered a mouse heart in the lab that beats on its own. The mouse heart had it...
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Virus-derived particles target blood cancer | KurzweilAI

Virus-derived particles target blood cancer | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Brightfield microscopy images of leukemia patient samples treated with control saline (left) and NRRPs (right). Ottawa researchers have developed unique
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Lab grown meat? Surely it's a matter of taste...

Lab grown meat? Surely it's a matter of taste... | Longevity science | Scoop.it
I think everybody agrees that in vitro production of meat could have big potential in solving world hunger. But the technology will not be to everybody's tastes ...
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Blood clots could be sucked out of the brain by a robotic device

Blood clots could be sucked out of the brain by a robotic device | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Intracerebral hemorrhaging is what occurs when a blood vessel in the brain bursts, and the blood which subsequently leaks out of that vessel forms a clot that places pressure on the surrounding brain tissue. It’s not that uncommon of an occurrence, it’s difficult to treat, and is fatal in about 40 percent of cases. Help may be on the way, however. A team from Nashville’s Vanderbilt University has created a robotic device that is designed to remove those clots, in a safe and minimally-invasive fashion.

 

As things currently stand, surgery is a risky approach to removing the clots. An access hole has to be drilled in the skull, and unless the clot is right on the outside of the brain, healthy brain tissue must be disturbed and damaged in order to reach it. The amount of damage caused by the surgery may even outweigh the benefits of removing the clot, which is why physicians often instead choose to administer anti-inflammatory drugs and hope for the best.

 

 

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How cancer chromosome abnormalities form in living cells | KurzweilAI

How cancer chromosome abnormalities form in living cells | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A chromosome translocation with breaks visualized by differently colored fluorescent proteins (green, red). DNA is stained cyan. (Credit: NCI) National
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Robot uses steerable needles to treat brain clots | KurzweilAI

Robot uses steerable needles to treat brain clots | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Vanderbilt University researchers are developing an image-guided robotic surgical system to remove blood clots in the brain. It uses steerable needles about the size of those used for biopsies to penetrate the brain with minimal damage and suction away the blood clot that has formed. The odds of a person getting an intracerebral hemorrhage are...
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High blood sugar tied to dementia in non-diabetics

Elderly people with high blood sugar - but not high enough to be diabetic - face a slightly greater risk of developing dementia, according to a new study of over 2,000 volunteers.

 

The research, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, does not prove that high glucose levels directly cause dementia.

 

 

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A bounty of ideas for healthful breakfasts

A bounty of ideas for healthful breakfasts | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Protein, healthful fat and fiber are what make a breakfast nutritious.
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Gadgets can track your sleep, monitor eating habits and help you stay fit

Gadgets can track your sleep, monitor eating habits and help you stay fit | Longevity science | Scoop.it

To help people become more aware of their physical activity — or lack of it — companies are marketing high-tech gadgets with claims that they can measure movement, sleep, food intake and weight. Here’s a quick look at some of the devices available now or coming soon. (None of them were tested in Consumer Reports’ labs.)

 

 

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New technology offers 3D images inside colon, pointing toward better colonoscopy

New technology offers 3D images inside colon, pointing toward better colonoscopy | Longevity science | Scoop.it

MIT researchers have developed a new endoscopy technology that could make it easier for doctors to detect precancerous lesions in the colon. Early detection of such lesions has been shown to reduce death rates from colorectal cancer, which kills about 50,000 people per year in the United States.

The new technique, known as photometric stereo endoscopy, can capture topographical images of the colon surface along with traditional two-dimensional images. Such images make it easier to see precancerous growths, including flatter lesions that traditional endoscopy usually misses, says Nicholas Durr, a research fellow in the Madrid-MIT M+Vision Consortium, a recently formed community of medical researchers in Boston and Madrid.

 

“In conventional colonoscopy screening, you look for these characteristic large polyps that grow into the lumen of the colon, which are relatively easy to see,” Durr says. “However, a lot of studies in the last few years have shown that more subtle, nonpolypoid lesions can also cause cancer.”

 

In the United States, colonoscopies are recommended beginning at age 50, and are credited with reducing the risk of death from colorectal cancer by about half. Traditional colonoscopy uses endoscopes with fiber-optic cameras to capture images.

Durr and his colleagues, seeking medical problems that could be solved with new optical technology, realized that there was a need to detect lesions that colonoscopy can miss. A technique called chromoendoscopy, in which a dye is sprayed in the colon to highlight topographical changes, offers better sensitivity but is not routinely used because it takes too long.

 

“What is attractive about this technique for colonoscopy is that it provides an added dimension of diagnostic information, particularly about three-dimensional morphology on the surface of the colon,” says Nimmi Ramanujam, a professor of biological engineering at Duke University who was not part of the research team.

The researchers built two prototypes — one 35 millimeters in diameter, which would be too large to use for colonoscopy, and one 14 millimeters in diameter, the size of a typical colonoscope. In tests with an artificial silicon colon, the researchers found that both prototypes could create 3-D representations of polyps and flatter lesions. 

The new technology should be easily incorporated into newer endoscopes, Durr says. “A lot of existing colonoscopes already have multiple light sources,” he says. “From a hardware perspective all they need to do is alternate the lights and then update their software to process this photometric data.” 

The researchers plan to test the technology in human patients in clinical trials at MGH and the Hospital Clinico San Carlos in Madrid. They are also working on additional computer algorithms that could help to automate the process of identifying polyps and lesions from the topographical information generated by the new system. 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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