Longevity science
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Live longer in good health and you will have a chance to extend your healthy life even further
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Tiny aquatic bio-bots swim like sperm and are powered by heart cells

Tiny aquatic bio-bots swim like sperm and are powered by heart cells | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Imagine how helpful it might be if sperm-like machines could be used for applications such as delivering medication to targeted areas of the body. Well, tha...
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Omega-3 intake linked to signs of brain aging

"The brain gets smaller during the normal aging process - about 0.5 percent per year after age 70, but dementia is associated with an accelerated and localized process of brain shrinkage," said researcher James Pottala.

 

Older women with higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids in their blood had slightly less brain shrinkage than women with low fatty acid levels in the new study.

 

The results may suggest that omega-3s protect the brain from the loss of volume that happens with normal aging and is seen more severely in people with dementia.

 

 

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Are you sitting down? Your heart failure risk is higher

Are you sitting down? Your heart failure risk is higher | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Heart failure is when the heart muscle isn't pumping blood adequately, but it doesn't mean the heart stops beating.

 

Both sitting too much — sometimes called sitting disease — and exercising too little may increase the chance of heart failure, a new study suggests.

 

The risk of heart failure was more than double for men who sat for at least five hours a day outside of work and didn't exercise very much compared with men who were physically active and sat for less than two hours a day, says the study's lead author, Deborah Rohm Young, a senior scientist at Kaiser Permanente in Pasadena, Calif.

 

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3D-printed prostheses give hope to amputees in war-torn Sudan

3D-printed prostheses give hope to amputees in war-torn Sudan | Longevity science | Scoop.it
US-based technology company Not Impossible Labs, through its Daniel Project, has not only provided 3D-printed prosthetic arms for amputees in war-torn Sudan...
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Injected microparticles shown to greatly reduce heart attack damage

Injected microparticles shown to greatly reduce heart attack damage | Longevity science | Scoop.it

After a heart attack has occurred, inflammatory cells known as monocytes rush to the damaged tissue. This causes the heart to swell, reducing its ability to pump blood, and further damaging the tissue – a potentially lethal situation. Now, however, scientists have discovered that injectable microparticles can help stop that from happening.

 

Developed in a collaboration between Illinois' Northwestern University and the University of Sydney in Australia, the 500-nanometer-wide particles are made from a biocompatible, biodegradable polymer called poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid. The substance is already approved by the FDA, for use in absorbable sutures. It's also being looked at for use in the treatment of diabetes and breast cancer.

 

 

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Hydrogel could dispense pain-killing medicine to joints as they move

Hydrogel could dispense pain-killing medicine to joints as they move | Longevity science | Scoop.it

People suffering from joint problems such as osteoarthritis tend to take a lot of anti-inflammatory drugs, even though such medications affect their whole body, all of the time. Scientists at the University of Delaware, however, are developing what could be a more effective alternative. It's a hydrogel that can be injected into the joint, and it releases medication only in response to mechanical force – in other words, whenever the joint is used.

 

In laboratory tests, it was confirmed that when the hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel was compressed, encapsulated drugs that had been mixed into it were discharged into the surrounding environment.

 

 

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Team's curator insight, October 16, 2014 10:52 AM

philippe : ciblage d'actif

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Vitamin D may improve cognition and mood in people with Parkinson's

Vitamin D may improve cognition and mood in people with Parkinson's | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Increased levels of vitamin D may reduce the risk of developing cognitive impairments and depression in people who suffer from Parkinson's disease, according to new research.
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10 nutrients that can lift your mood

10 nutrients that can lift your mood | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Not only are foods rich in vitamins, minerals and fatty acids healthful, but studies show they can also increase happiness, lessen symptoms of depression and quell anxiety.

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Researchers have studied the association between foods and the brain and identified 10 nutrients that can combat depression and boost mood: calcium, chromium, folate, iron, magnesium, omega-3 fatty acids, Vitamin B6, Vitamin B12, Vitamin D and zinc.

 

 

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World’s first $1,000 genome enables ‘factory’ scale sequencing for population and disease studies | KurzweilAI

Illumina, Inc. announced Tuesday that its new HiSeq X Ten Sequencing System has broken the “sound barrier” of human genomics by enabling the $1,000 genome.

 

“This platform includes dramatic technology breakthroughs that enable researchers to undertake studies of unprecedented scale by providing the throughput to sequence tens of thousands of human whole genomes in a single year in a single lab,” Illumina stated.

 

 

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Brain training helped older adults stay sharp for years: study

Brain training helped older adults stay sharp for years: study | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A brief course of brain exercises helped older adults hold on to improvements in reasoning skills and processing speed for 10 years after the course ended, according to results from the largest study ever done on cognitive training.

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The federally sponsored trial of almost 3,000 older adults, called the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly study, or ACTIVE, looked at how three brain training programs...

 

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Eating tree nuts tied to lowered obesity risk

Eating tree nuts tied to lowered obesity risk | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A new U.S. study adds to growing evidence that nuts - once considered too fattening to be healthy - may in fact help keep weight down, in addition to offering other health benefits.

 

Researchers found that study participants who ate the most tree nuts - such as almonds, Brazil nuts, pistachios and walnuts - were between 37 and 46 percent less likely to be obese than those who ate the fewest tree nuts.

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Two-in-one nanoparticles exploit tumor cells to precisely deliver multiple drugs

Two-in-one nanoparticles exploit tumor cells to precisely deliver multiple drugs | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A nanoparticle delivery system exploits biochemical and cellular pathways in tumor cells to deliver two different drugs to different locations in the cell. ...

 

Treating tumors is combining two or more drugs, which has the effect of decreasing toxicity and increasing the synergistic effects between the drugs. However, the efficacy of this kind of cocktail treatment suffers when the drugs require access to different parts of the cell, a bit like fighting a battle by depositing all your archers on the same spot as your infantrymen.

 

By making use of nanoparticle-based carriers, researchers at North Carolina State University are able to transport multiple drugs into cancerous cells optimally and precisely...

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How do you measure up? New health gadgets can tell you

How do you measure up? New health gadgets can tell you | Longevity science | Scoop.it

One of the fastest-growing areas for new products: digital health and fitness devices, geared toward helping people tackle those New Year's resolutions head-on.

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So how helpful are the latest batch of self-regulating devices? Very, if you want to beat depression, lose weight, reduce stress or improve your fitness level. The one thing you still can't get from technology however: motivation. These apps only work if you actually get yourself to use them.

 

Among products making their debuts at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas:

 

 

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Stem cells could offer alternative treatment for patients with resistant tuberculosis

Stem cells could offer alternative treatment for patients with resistant tuberculosis | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A team of international researchers has turned to stem cells in a quest to find an a more effective treatment for patients with drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). The new method being investigated involves using the patients’ own bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to boost immune response and heal damaged tissue.

 

Multi-drug resistant TB effects around 450,000 in Eastern Europe, Asia, and South Africa according to the World Health Organization, and conventional treatments have a low rate of success.

 

Currently in its preliminary stages, the study is designed to investigate the possibility that MSCs can help organs to regulate themselves and repair damaged or traumatized tissues. Specifically in this case, the stem cells migrate to the lung with TB bacteria inflammation and improve the immune response to help the body get rid of the bacteria.

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Soft pneumatic exoskeleton could be perfect for use in rehab

Soft pneumatic exoskeleton could be perfect for use in rehab | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Exoskeletons can be used in rehabilitation, guiding patients' disabled limbs through a normal range of motion in order to develop muscle memory. The problem is, most exoskeletons are rigid.

 

Scientists are working on a new partial "soft exoskeleton" that replicates the body's own muscles, tendons and ligaments.

 

It incorporates pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs), lightweight sensors and control software.

 

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New technique allows minimally invasive ‘nanobiopsies’ of living cells | KurzweilAI

New technique allows minimally invasive ‘nanobiopsies’ of living cells | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at UC Santa Cruz (UCSC) have developed a robotic “nanobiopsy” system that can extract tiny samples from inside a living cell without killing it.

 

The single-cell nanobiopsy technique is a powerful tool for scientists working to understand the dynamic processes that occur within living cells, according to Nader Pourmand, professor of biomolecular engineering in UCSC’s Baskin School of Engineering.

 

“We can take a biopsy from a living cell and go back to the same cell multiple times over a couple of days without killing it. With other technologies, you have to sacrifice a cell to analyze it,” said Pourmand, who leads the Biosensors and Bioelectrical Technology group at UCSC.

 

 

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New test could make ulcer-causing bacteria emit green light in the stomach

New test could make ulcer-causing bacteria emit green light in the stomach | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Research carried out by a team of scientists at the University of Southern Denmark literally sheds new light on how a non-invasive technique for the early diagnosis of stomach ulcers could be performed in the future. The findings of the researchers point to a fast, hassle-free method that does not require sample tissues, unlike current testing methods.

 

The experiments were carried out to detect the presence of a bacteria called Helicobacter Pylori. It's found in virtually every other person, and is a risk factor associated with gastric cancer, the second most deadly cancer across the globe.

 

 

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Understanding the aging gut: Microbiome modifications may be linked to health and lifespan

Understanding the aging gut: Microbiome modifications may be linked to health and lifespan | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Modifications to the microbiota could lead to changes in health and lifespan that are associated with aging, according to new research in fruit flies.
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Google announces glucose-monitoring contact lens prototype

Google announces glucose-monitoring contact lens prototype | Longevity science | Scoop.it

While we have seen the technology behind glucose-monitoring contact lenses develop over the least few years, getting them out of the lab and onto the eyes of diabetes sufferers has been a different story. With Google announcing its testing of a smart contact lens designed to measure glucose levels in tears, the search giant is looking to provide more effective management of the disease.

 

The project team, led by Brian Otis and Babak Parvis at the Google X laboratory, developed a wireless chip and miniaturized glucose sensor, embedding them between two layers of soft contact lens material. This formed a prototype of a smart contact lens, which Google says is capable of generating one reading of glucose levels per second.

 

 

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Experimental gene therapy improves sight in patients going blind

Toby Stroh was in his 20s when his doctor told him he would go blind in his 50s, and his years of playing tennis and being able to drive or work could be gone long before that.

 

Now aged 56, two years after his retina was deliberately infected with a virus carrying a gene to correct a protein deficiency that was destroying its cells, he is a regular on the tennis court and has a successful career in law.

 

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Although the results are from only six patients in a very early stage Phase I trial, researchers said they suggest more studies should be done to see if similar gene therapies could be developed for other more common genetic causes of blindness such as macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa.

 

 

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Could Implanted Pellets Replace Booster Shots?

Could Implanted Pellets Replace Booster Shots? | Longevity science | Scoop.it

What if doctors could deliver a no-tears vaccine? That’s what some researchers at the University of Freiburg, in Germany, are working toward. In a recent paper, they demonstrated that a small pellet could be implanted under the skin along with an injected vaccine. Later, instead of a booster shot, a pill taken orally would signal the pellet to release a second dose.

 

 

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Leukemia treatment given shot in the arm by artificial bone marrow development

Leukemia treatment given shot in the arm by artificial bone marrow development | Longevity science | Scoop.it

European researchers have announced a breakthrough in the development of artificial bone marrow which expands the ability of scientists to reproduce stem cells in the lab and could lead to increased availability of treatment for leukemia sufferers.

 

One of the main treatments for the blood cancer is the injection of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). These HSCs can either be harvested from a compatible donor or cultivated from the patient’s own bone marrow in the lab.

 

The greatest challenges in producing HSCs in the lab has been their limited longevity outside of the bone marrow environment. This problem may soon be circumvented

 

 

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New superglue fixes holes in the heart

New superglue fixes holes in the heart | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists have developed a sort of superglue for the heart, that quickly and securely bonds patches to holes.

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The liquid glue, along with possessing those same characteristics, is also biocompatible, biodegradable, and has an elastic consistency once set.

 

 

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Team's curator insight, November 1, 2014 2:11 PM

Philippe: superglue

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Scientists identify possible key to drug resistance in Crohn's disease

Scientists identify possible key to drug resistance in Crohn's disease | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Two-thirds to three-quarters of the estimated 700,000 Americans living with Crohn's disease, an autoimmune condition that can disrupt the entire gastrointestinal tract, will require surgery at some point during their life. Patients and physicians often turn to this surgical intervention after a patient develops resistance to current treatments, such as steroids.

 

 

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Lung cancer rates decline for U.S. men, women: study

The percentage of U.S. adults developing lung cancer is falling, with the sharpest declines among those aged 35 to 44, according to U.S. data released on Thursday, fifty years after the surgeon general's first-ever report warning of the dangers of smoking.

 

The lung cancer rate dropped by 2.6 percent per year among men and 1.1 percent per year among women, between 2005 and 2009, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found, using the most recent available data.

 

 

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