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Longevity science
Live longer in good health and you will have a chance to extend your healthy life even further
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Implanted hearing aid uses bone conduction to bypass defective middle ear

Implanted hearing aid uses bone conduction to bypass defective middle ear | Longevity science | Scoop.it

There may soon be help for people who have been rendered functionally deaf by problems of the middle ear. Researchers from Sweden’s Chalmers University of Technology have developed an implant that bypasses the defective middle ear, transmitting sounds to the inner ear by sending vibrations right through the skull bone.

 

 

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Probiotic plus aloe shows cholesterol-lowering potential: Animal data

Probiotic plus aloe shows cholesterol-lowering potential: Animal data | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Combining probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supplements with aloe vera may slash cholesterol levels by over 40%, suggests a new study with lab rats.
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Fish oil plus sterols and B vitamin may improve heart disease risk factors: Pilot study

A mixture of B vitamins, fish oils and plant sterols shows promise in boosting heart health by improving the lipid profile of young people with high levels of cholesterol, according to new research.
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How to convert connective tissue directly into neurons | KurzweilAI

How to convert connective tissue directly into neurons | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Repression of a single protein in ordinary fibroblasts (connective tissue) is sufficient to directly convert them into functional neurons, scientists in the U.S. and China have discovered.

 

The findings could have far-reaching implications for the development of new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases like Huntington’s, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

 

 

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Stem Cells Used To Bolster Body’s Cancer Fighting Cells

Stem Cells Used To Bolster Body’s Cancer Fighting Cells | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at the RIKEN Research Center for Allergy and Immunology in Yokohama, Japan have devised a way to increase the number of cancer-fighting T cells and make up for their short life spans with the hope that the superior numbers of immune cells will enable them to overwhelm and conquer.

 

 

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Berkeley develops quick blood test to ID people exposed to ionizing radiation

Berkeley develops quick blood test to ID people exposed to ionizing radiation | Longevity science | Scoop.it

As early treatment is the key to maximizing the odds of surviving a large dose of radiation, sorting out the radiological exposure of the victims is a high priority. Unfortunately, at present no quick medical screen exists to identify people exposed to dangerous levels of radiation. While there are early changes in white cell populations, these also can result from an infection due to an injury or chemical exposure.

 

Medical researchers at the US Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have now developed a simple blood test to determine the exposure of a patient to ionizing radiation, that can be carried out in the field with a hand-held analyzer.

 

 

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Bioengineer developing needle-free nanopatch vaccines

Bioengineer developing needle-free nanopatch vaccines | Longevity science | Scoop.it
LONDON (Reuters) - When it comes to protecting millions of people from deadly infectious diseases, Mark Kendall thinks a fingertip-sized patch covered in thousands of vaccine-coated microscopic spikes...
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Compact radiation source could put an X-ray scanner in your pocket

Compact radiation source could put an X-ray scanner in your pocket | Longevity science | Scoop.it

While we’ve seen developments that could see T-ray spectrometers featuring in a future handheld tricorder-like device, good ol’ X-rays could also get a guernsey thanks to an engineering team from the University of Missouri. The team has invented an accelerator about the size of a stick of gum that can create X-rays and other forms of radiation, opening up the possibility of cheap and portable X-ray scanners.

 

 

Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Enabling technologies such as inexpensive genomic sequencing, portable medical equipment, and smart-phone medical gadgets can democratize medical care... if the developments are handled properly.

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12 months to healthier eating

12 months to healthier eating | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Break your better-eating resolution into 12 manageable parts and implement one each month.
Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Also in this article, 25 recipes under 500 calories.

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How to sequence an entire genome from a single cell | KurzweilAI

How to sequence an entire genome from a single cell | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The notion that police can identify a suspect based on the tiniest drop of blood or trace of tissue has long been a staple of TV dramas, but scientists at Harvard have now taken the idea a step further. Using just a single human cell, they can reproduce an individual’s entire genome.

 

The researchers developed a method — dubbed MALBAC, short for Multiple Annealing and Looping-based Amplification Cycles — that requires just one cell to reproduce an entire DNA molecule.

 

 

Ray and Terry's 's insight:

As reported by KurzweilAI.net, this technique could lead to more nimble cancer treatments and enhanced prenatal screening.

 

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Promising compound restores memory loss and reverses symptoms of Alzheimer’s | KurzweilAI

Promising compound restores memory loss and reverses symptoms of Alzheimer’s | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

New research in the FASEB Journal by NIH scientists suggests that a small molecule called TFP5 rescues plaques and tangles by blocking an overactive brain signal, thereby restoring memory in mice with Alzheimer’s — without obvious toxic side effects.

 

“We hope that clinical trial studies in AD patients yield an extended and a better quality of life, as observed in mice upon TFP5 treatment,” said Harish C. Pant, Ph.D., a senior researcher involved in the work from the Laboratory of Neurochemistry at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders at Stroke at the National Institutes of Health.

 

 

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GE Silent Scan turns down the volume on MRI scanners

GE Silent Scan turns down the volume on MRI scanners | Longevity science | Scoop.it

GE Healthcare has introduced a new data acquisition technology designed to improve patient comfort by largely eliminating the horrible noise generated during an MRI scan. Conventional MRI scanners can generate noise levels in excess of 110 dBA (creating a din that sounds like a cross between a vehicle's reverse warning horn and a Star Trek phaser) but GE says its new Silent Scan MRI technology can reduce this to just above background noise levels in the exam room.

The noise that MRI scanners produce is related to changes in the magnetic field that allow the slice by slice body scan to be carried out. In recent years, industry efforts to speed up the scanning process have also resulted in louder and louder scans. The designers have attempted to dampen these noises with mufflers and baffles, achieving only limited success.

 

 

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Green tea trumps rivals for antioxidant and antimicrobial properties

Green tea trumps rivals for antioxidant and antimicrobial properties | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A South Korean study evaluating the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of tea extracts found that green tea showed the highest antioxidant activity in most tests and potent antimicrobial activity.
Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Green tea contains 1/4 the caffeine of coffee and also provides l-theanine, a calming agent. Plus the active extract (EGCG) has been studied for its additional amazing health properties, including the ability to help prevent cancerous activity in the cells.

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Coughs take longer to clear up than people think

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The gap between how long people expect their cough to last and how long it actually does may drive some to the doctor for antibiotics that won't help, according to a new study.Researchers...
Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Antibiotics are overused and create an imbalance in your digestive and immune system. If you have been taking antibiotics for an illness, consider supplementing with probiotics afterwards in order to reset your gastric balance of healthy bacterium. 

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Curcumin + Omega-3 Curbed Breast Cancer - Vital Choice

Curcumin + Omega-3 Curbed Breast Cancer - Vital Choice | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Lab experiments and preliminary clinical studies indicate that curcuminoids support immune and brain health in uniquely powerful ways. And earlier this month, the authors of a review paper painted this positive picture of the substantial clinical evidence on curcumin:“Extensive clinical trials over the past quarter century have addressed the … efficacy of [curcumin and] promising effects have been observed in patients with various pro-inflammatory diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, arthritis … [and more than 25 others]. (Gupta SC et al. 2013).

 

 

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Pill-sized device provides rapid, detailed imaging of esophageal lining

Pill-sized device provides rapid, detailed imaging of esophageal lining | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Physicians may soon have a new way to screen patients for Barrett's esophagus, a precancerous condition usually caused by chronic exposure to stomach acid. Researchers at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have developed an imaging system enclosed in a capsule about the size of a multivitamin pill that creates detailed, microscopic images of the esophageal wall.

 

The system has several advantages over traditional endoscopy.

 

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Tiny machine apes production line

Tiny machine apes production line | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Manchester scientists have developed a tiny molecular machine that mirrors the function of the ribosome, which builds the proteins in our body's cells.

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The ultimate goal is to synthesize new drug molecules or new types of plastic.

 

 

Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Nanotechnology is part of Bridge 3, which is the final bridge to radical life extension.

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UV Light Emitting Machine Disinfects Hospital Rooms In Minutes

UV Light Emitting Machine Disinfects Hospital Rooms In Minutes | Longevity science | Scoop.it

It’s a staggering modern-day irony that the most common complication for hospital patients is acquiring an infection during their visit, affecting 1 in 20 patients in the US. It’s a problem estimated to cause millions of infections with 100,000 or so leading to death per year and a whopping $45 billion annually in hospital costs. If this isn’t bad enough, the tragedies from deadly superbugs within healthcare facilities are on the rise and will likely continue as the last lines of antibiotics fail without any new drugs moving fast enough up the pipeline to help.

 

Fortunately, an alternative to medication promises to vastly improve the disinfection of hospital rooms, thanks to a UV light-emitting robot from Xenex Healthcare.

 

 

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MIT developing self-healing materials that act like blood clots

MIT developing self-healing materials that act like blood clots | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Blood clots are one way in which the body heals itself after injuries on even the tiniest level. The process is fast, reliable and goes on every minute of the day without our being aware of it.

 

Now, a team led by MIT assistant professor of materials science and engineering Alfredo Alexander-Katz is studying blood clots as a new model for producing self-healing materials.

 

 

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Insulin “docking“ breakthrough could lead to better diabetes treatments

Insulin “docking“ breakthrough could lead to better diabetes treatments | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Despite decades of study, scientists remained unsure as to how insulin binds to the insulin receptor on the surface of cells to allow them to take up sugar from the blood and transform it into energy.

 

Now, a definitive answer has now been found with a team of scientists capturing the first three-dimensional images of insulin “docking” to its receptor.

 

It is hoped that the new knowledge can be exploited to develop new and improved insulin medications to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

 

 

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Now 75, Jane Fonda looks back — and ahead

Now 75, Jane Fonda looks back — and ahead | Longevity science | Scoop.it
An interview on aging and life with actress Jane Fonda, who is now 75 years old.
Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Exercise is the biggest enabler for older adults. With fitness comes independence and vitality.

 

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Are You Scared of What’s in Your Genome?

Are You Scared of What’s in Your Genome? | Longevity science | Scoop.it

I’m sick of reading about the dangers of the genome. There are lots of popular articles I could point to, but let’s start with a recent series in Time that included eight online features and the Dec. 13 cover story, ominously titled “The DNA Dilemma.”

 

The series, written by Bonnie Rochman, is thoroughly reported, balanced, and full of fascinating personal stories about children whose genomes have been sequenced. It’s also timely: The primary question Rochman raises—how much information is too much information?—has been dominating commentaries about genetic testing in the medical literature.

 

But this is the wrong question, or at least one that’s becoming increasingly irrelevant.

 

 

Ray and Terry's 's insight:

With the wealth of genetic information (at a reasonable price) available to the public, there are ethical questions that arise. Some might panic about individuals having too much information about their own DNA, but this author suggests that we can handle it.

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Exercise May Add Years of Life

Exercise May Add Years of Life | Longevity science | Scoop.it

“Exercise can partially reverse the effects of the aging process ... a minimum quantity and quality of exercise decreases the risk of death, prevents development of certain cancers, lowers the risk of osteoporosis, and increases longevity.” (Gremeaux V et al. 2012)

 Now, a data analysis from Canada pinpoints the lifespan extension different groups can expect from regular, moderate exercise. 

 

 

Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Again and again, exercise is proven to help increase life expectancy. More importantly, staying active will extend your quality life span, because you will remain healthier and retain vibrancy as you age.

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Too much food can kill you? Overeating and obesity now a bigger global problem than lack of food

Too much food can kill you? Overeating and obesity now a bigger global problem than lack of food | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Chronic diseases linked to obesity and overconsumption of food are now a bigger global healthcare burden than illness and disease caused by malnutrition, according to the most comprehensive disease report ever produced on global health issues.
Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Moderate caloric restriction (reduce your daily caloric intake by 10-20%) can have numerous health benefits. Start by finding your target calorie intake to maintain an optimal weight. If you can stick to that daily level, reduce it by 10%.

 

Fasting is also beneficial. The easiest way? Stop eating at 6-7pm and don't eat again until 6-7am. With minimal effort, you have a 12 hour fast. Plus, you will sleep easier if your digestive system is at rest.

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tiana cherie burne's curator insight, November 3, 11:30 PM

 

For the first time ever, diseases associated with obesity are now more of a global health burden the lack of nutrition. This investigation has been going for 5 years with over 50 scientists exploring the deep issues of obesity. I believe it's a personal decision too eat badly, don't do enough physical activity, drink to much, smoke to many cigars and just don't look after your body the way were meant to. Rising numbers of obesity has been increased with young adults over the years. The biggest global risks effecting people is high blood rate, which is also the biggest neglected global health in most countries.

These scientists thankfully have put out antidotes that have helped save many millions of kids and adults from obesity. We really need more help like this in society, we need to team up and help out each other, were all human no one is special so don't be afraid to ask for help.

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The Future of Medicine Is Now

The Future of Medicine Is Now | Longevity science | Scoop.it
From cancer treatments to new devices to gene therapy, a look at six medical innovations that are poised to transform the way we fight disease.
Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Technology can propel us towards a healthier future. The advances of recent years provide ammunition to protect and repair our biology.

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