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Live longer in good health and you will have a chance to extend your healthy life even further
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Electronic membrane could provide high-res heart care

Electronic membrane could provide high-res heart care | Longevity science | Scoop.it

When it comes to monitoring the electrical activity of the heart, or delivering electrical stimulation to it (as in the case of pacemakers), most current technologies rely on electrodes that make contact with the organ in just a few locations. That doesn't necessarily provide a very detailed picture of what's going on, nor does it deliver stimulation all that evenly.


Now, scientists have created a sensor-laden three-dimensional elastic membrane that can be pulled over the whole heart, to provide a large number of contact points.



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Foods that can save your skin

Foods that can save your skin | Longevity science | Scoop.it

My boys love to talk about the biggest bone in their body (the femur) and the largest muscle (the gluteus maximus). What is it with boys and big? I stumped them recently when I asked them to name the body’s largest organ. They debated between the large intestine and the liver. Nope, neither.


Our skin is our largest organ. It protects us from harsh temperatures, sunlight and chemicals, and also prevents infections from entering our bodies. It makes Vitamin D and has sensors that tell our brains what is happening in the world outside our bodies. Our skin also excretes toxins and waste products — pounds of them a day. And for the aged, it can often tell a story right on our faces!



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Greg Wurn's curator insight, March 4, 2014 9:14 PM

you may take your skin for granted, well until you age and your skin becomes thin and fragile, prevention is far better than cure, how bio accumulative are vitamin tablets is still debatable, correct diet is still the best way to go !

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Alzheimer's News Points to Omega-3s' Promise

Alzheimer's News Points to Omega-3s' Promise | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Omega-3s from fish are essential to brain function and health.
 
Omega-3 EPA and DHA abound in virtually every human cell, and in seafood … and DHA is by far the dominant fat in human brains, where it plays many essential roles.
 
Some, though not all, population studies link higher fish intake to lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other forms of dementia.
 
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How to perform a background check on your doctor

How to perform a background check on your doctor | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Unfortunately, there’s no foolproof way to vet your doctor, says physician Michael Carome, director of the health research group at Public Citizen, a consumer advocacy organization based in Washington. But there are some basic steps you can take to look into a doctor’s credentials and record.



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Vegetarian diets may lower blood pressure

Vegetarian diets may lower blood pressure | Longevity science | Scoop.it

People who eat a vegetarian diet tend to have lower blood pressure than non-vegetarians, according to a new review of past studies.


Researchers said for some people, eating a vegetarian diet could be a good way to treat high blood pressure without medication



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Glove delivers electrical pulses to improve touch for stroke victims and the elderly

Glove delivers electrical pulses to improve touch for stroke victims and the elderly | Longevity science | Scoop.it

While we can counter the deterioration of sight and hearing with glasses and hearing aids, few tools exist for combating a degenerating sense of touch. A common ailment among stroke patients and the aging, treating diminishing tactile perception has proven a complicated task. Looking to provide a wearable solution unimposing enough for everyday use, a research team from Germany's Ruhr University Bochum (RUB) is developing a stimulation glove designed to be worn passively to alleviate such impairments.



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Single-chip device to provide real-time ultrasonic 3D images from inside the heart and blood vessels | KurzweilAI

Single-chip device to provide real-time ultrasonic 3D images from inside the heart and blood vessels | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The technology for a device that would provide real-time 3D imaging from inside the heart, coronary arteries, and peripheral blood vessels has been developed by Georgia Institute of Technology researchers.


With its volumetric imaging, the new device could better guide surgeons working in the heart and allow more of patients’ clogged arteries to be cleared without major surgery.



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New bioprinting technique creates thicker, healthier tissue

New bioprinting technique creates thicker, healthier tissue | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The notion of 3D printed biological tissue holds all kinds of possibilities for drug testing and the reparation of damaged cells, though replicating the complexities of human tissue in a lab presents some very big challenges. A new bioprinting method developed by researchers from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University has enabled the creation of tissue constructs with small blood vessels and multiple cell types, marking important progress toward the printing of living tissue.



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Bionic pancreas could be life-changing for diabetics

Bionic pancreas could be life-changing for diabetics | Longevity science | Scoop.it

For people living with type 1 diabetes, a constant process of monitoring and adjusting blood sugar levels is required. A change may be on the horizon, though. A bionic pancreas trialled among 30 adults has been very well-received by the participants, and has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for three transitional outpatient studies over the next 18 months.


People with type 1 diabetes are unable to produce insulin, a hormone that is required to control the level of sugar in the bloodstream. As a result, blood sugar levels can vary dramatically, causing potential damage to body organs when too high, or confusion and loss of consciousness when too low.



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Nanotechnology could enable on-demand manufacture of vaccines

Nanotechnology could enable on-demand manufacture of vaccines | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers from the University of Washington have created a vaccine with the potential to make on-demand vaccination cheaper and quicker, using engineered nanoparticles. Tests with mice show definite promise for the technology's use on humans.


A vaccine is essentially a biological preparation containing elements that resemble the disease it is designed to inoculate against. This has the effect of teaching the body to recognize the harmful foreign agent, and to allow the body's immune system to efficiently destroy it. This information is stored by the body and creates an immunity to future exposure to the disease.



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Another reason to eat well, lose weight and get in shape

Another reason to eat well, lose weight and get in shape | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Cutting your risk of cancer is no longer just about shunning tobacco. Be lean. Eat healthfully. Get active. Common-sense lifestyle strategies for lowering the risk of heart disease and diabetes are now being shown to help prevent many types of cancer.


Of course, there are few absolutes in cancer prevention. Cancer is still a riddle, with many factors, including genetics, playing a role. But growing evidence suggests that there are steps that we can take to lower our chances of getting the disease, experts say.



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A drug that can help wipe out reservoirs of cancer cells in bone marrow | KurzweilAI

A drug that can help wipe out reservoirs of cancer cells in bone marrow | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Cancer drugs that recruit antibodies from the body’s own immune system to help kill tumors have shown much promise in treating several types of cancer. But the tumors often return.


A new study from MIT reveals a way to combat these recurrent tumors with a drug that makes them more vulnerable to the antibody treatment. This drug, known as cyclophosphamide, is already approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat some cancers.



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Latest Tool to Fight Cancer Is a Crowdsourcing 'Asteroids'-Like Mobile Game

Latest Tool to Fight Cancer Is a Crowdsourcing 'Asteroids'-Like Mobile Game | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The promise of genetics to shed light on how we prevent and treat disease has been inextricably linked to the growth of computer power since the first human genome was sequenced in the 1990s. Computers account for faster, cheaper sequencing, and they allow researchers to sort through huge troves of data to look for the correlations between a specific genetic mutation and a particular health problem.


But Cancer Research UK, a group that has made notable advances in the genetic understanding of breast cancers, is turning that paradigm on its head. The organization is asking humans to sort through its data to mark genetic areas with extra copies of chromosomes because, it says, humans can see the disparities better than computers.


“Although the software is good, it’s nowhere near as good as the human eye for spotting subtle shifts in copy number,” the organization explained in a press release announcing its efforts to recruit citizen scientists.



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Stamp of approval for new living cell printing technique

Stamp of approval for new living cell printing technique | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers in Houston have developed a cost effective method for printing living cells, claiming almost a 100 percent survival rate. The method, which is akin to a modern version of ancient Chinese wood block printing, allow cells to be printed on any surface and in virtually any two dimensional shape. And while current inkjet printers adapted to print living cells can cost upwards of US$10,000 with a cell survival rate of around 50 percent, this simple new technique could see the cell stamps produced for around $1.


While Block-Cell-Printing, BloC-Printing for short, has its limitations, it is much slower and more labor intensive than inkjet and is as yet unable to print in three dimensions, the technology is still in its infancy.



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With the ‘Bionanoprobe,’ rapid freezing leads to better nanoscale imaging of cells | KurzweilAI

With the ‘Bionanoprobe,’ rapid freezing leads to better nanoscale imaging of cells | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

For scientists to determine if a cell is functioning properly, they must destroy it (with X-rays), possibly giving false accounts of how the cell actually works.


Now, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have created a new probe that freezes cells to “see” at greater detail without damaging the sample.*



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Magnetic medicine: nanoparticles and magnetic fields train immune cells to fight cancer in mice | KurzweilAI

Magnetic medicine: nanoparticles and magnetic fields train immune cells to fight cancer in mice | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Johns Hopkins researchers have trained the immune systems of mice to fight melanoma, a deadly skin cancer, by using nanoparticles designed to target cancer-fighting immune cells,  The experiments, described in ACS Nano February 24, represent a significant step toward using nanoparticles and magnetism to treat a variety of conditions, the researchers say.


“By using small enough particles, we could, for the first time, see a key difference in cancer-fighting cells, and we harnessed that knowledge to enhance the immune attack on cancer,” said Jonathan Schneck, M.D., Ph.D., a professor of pathology, medicine and oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine‘s Institute for Cell Engineering.


Schneck’s team has pioneered the development of artificial white blood cells...



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New device uses laser to provide life-saving information on patients' blood

New device uses laser to provide life-saving information on patients' blood | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Not everyone's blood clots at the same rate. While that might seem like simply an interesting bit of trivia, it's anything but trivial to doctors performing operations or emergency procedures, who need to know what might be required in the way of transfusions or anticoagulant drugs. Now, an optical device can provide them with that information within minutes.


Currently, in order to measure its clotting properties, patients' blood must be subjected to a series of lab tests that can take hours to perform, that require relatively large amounts of blood, or that involve large, expensive machines. The new device, developed by a team at Massachusetts General Hospital, gets much quicker, less costly results, it's about the size of a Kleenex box, and it only requires a few drops.



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Researchers hijack cancer migration mechanism to ‘move’ brain tumors | KurzweilAI

Researchers hijack cancer migration mechanism to ‘move’ brain tumors | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

One factor that makes glioblastoma cancers so difficult to treat is that malignant cells from the tumors spread throughout the brain by following nerve fibers and blood vessels to invade new locations.


Now, Georgia Tech and Emory University researchers have learned to hijack this migratory mechanism, turning it against the cancer by using a film of nanofibers to lure tumor cells away.


Instead of invading new areas, the migrating cells latch onto the specially-designed nanofibers and follow them to a location — potentially outside the brain — where they can be captured and killed.



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3D-printed heart helps doctors prepare for life-saving surgery

3D-printed heart helps doctors prepare for life-saving surgery | Longevity science | Scoop.it

3D printing technology has assisted in life-saving heart surgery performed on a 14-month old child, with the J.B Speed School of Engineering at the University of Louisville producing a printed model of the child's heart prior to the procedure, allowing the doctors to better prepare for the operation.


Chief of Radiology at Kosair Children's Hospital Philip Dydysnki approached the school when he and his medical team were looking at ways of treating Roland Lian Cung Bawi, a boy born with four heart defects.



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Stanford scientists use light to control pain in mice

Stanford scientists use light to control pain in mice | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists at Stanford Bio-X, the institution's department for breakthrough discoveries about the human body and disease, have modified mice with gene therapy so that their sensitivity to pain can be altered by shining light on their paws.


This application of the neuromodulation technique called optogenetics starts with the insertion of light-sensitive proteins called opsins into the nerves of the mice. The researchers then showed that that exposure to one color of light can increase pain sensitivity in the mice whilst another reduces it.



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11 Toxic Chemicals Affecting Brain Development In Children

In a study published in The Lancet Neurology, researchers outline new chemicals that may be contributing to what they dub the “global, silent pandemic of neurodevelopmental toxicity.”


In 2006, the team had released a list of five neurotoxins that may contribute to everything from cognitive deficits to attention problems. Now that list is expanded, based on new research that has since accumulated on chemicals linked to developmental disorders in children.



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Personal Genome Diagnostics' Circulating Tumor DNA technology highlighted in landmark study

Personal Genome Diagnostics Inc. (PGDx), a provider of advanced cancer genome analysis and testing services, reported that its proprietary technology was used in a major new study being published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.
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Paralyzed woman walks again with 3D-printed robotic exoskeleton

Paralyzed woman walks again with 3D-printed robotic exoskeleton | Longevity science | Scoop.it

3D Systems, in collaboration with Ekso Bionics, has created a 3D-printed robotic exoskeleton that has restored the ability to walk in a woman paralyzed from the waist down. The Ekso-Suit was trialled and demonstrated by Amanda Boxtel, who was told by her doctor that she'd never walk again after a skiing accident in 1992.


Robotic exoskeletons were once the stuff of sci-fi movies, bestowing their wearers with superhuman strength and speed. Though organizations like DARPA and Lockheed have been developing exoskeletons with human-enhancing military uses in mind, the technology has also proved of great benefit to the medical profession.


ReWalk has provided powered exoskeletons for individuals with spinal cord injuries since 2011 and the EU-funded Mindwalker project has developed a mind-controlled robotic exoskeleton.



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Aiden Waring's curator insight, March 28, 2014 9:05 AM

Human augmentation and interaction with robotics: what was once a niche industry years ago has now become a mainstream success in forwarding technology. A 3D printed exoskeleton has been made specifically to aid a handicapped woman with a severe spinal injury to walk normally again: a medical miracle performed by revolutionary technology.


This news is an excellent example of the many ways 3D printing can be practically used to change a person's life and, more specifically, change many people's lives.

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New therapies targeting cancer could change everything

New therapies targeting cancer could change everything | Longevity science | Scoop.it

...The doctors said he had stage 4 melanoma, with a virtually inoperable tumor, and that patients in his condition typically lived about eight months. By last June, the cancer had spread to his liver and lungs.


At that point Harris joined a clinical trial at Georgetown University, one of scores that have sprung up around the country to test a new class of cancer drugs called immune-checkpoint inhibitors.


Two weeks after his first infusion, Harris’s primary tumor was fading, along with the black cancerous beads around it. A month later, his liver and lungs were clean.



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X-Ray App Assists Doctors In Diagnosing Rare Conditions

X-Ray App Assists Doctors In Diagnosing Rare Conditions | Longevity science | Scoop.it

n recent years, ultrasound machines and eye exams have gone mobile, for example, and tiny portable lab kits have popped up to diagnose a number of diseases.


But an Irish venture, Experior Medical, is taking an indirect route to better care: It gives doctors practical experience via mobile device so they provide better care. Users of the company’s moniker app practice reading real X-ray images on an iPad in their downtime.


While a broken femur is easy to see, a tiny cancerous growth may not be, and doctors don’t ever get much practice spotting rare conditions.



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