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Longevity science
Live longer in good health and you will have a chance to extend your healthy life even further
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Bacteria-killing blue light used to stop infections

Bacteria-killing blue light used to stop infections | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Over the past few years, blue light has allowed us to understand heart problems, control brain functions, and activate muscle tissue. Now, another biomedical function can be added to its list – because it’s known to have antimicrobial qualities, it’s been used to stop infections of the skin and soft tissues.

According to the American Society for Microbiology, such infections are the second most commonly-encountered type in private practice, and the most common type presented in emergency rooms. Unfortunately, as bacterial resistance to antibiotics grows, other means of stopping these infections are increasingly needed.

 

 

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Supplements for kids: There’s not much evidence that they’re valuable.

Supplements for kids: There’s not much evidence that they’re valuable. | Longevity science | Scoop.it

 

One exception: Many experts recommend Vitamin D supplements for kids of all ages.

 

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Free Public health Open Courseware & Classes - College@Home

Public health is a diverse field that includes ideas and practices from economics, social studies, intercultural communication, global outreach, public policy, disaster preparedness, refugee health, and much more.

 

For students thinking about pursuing a career in one of the many different avenues of public health, and for professionals already working in the industry, open courseware provides a unique opportunity for exploration in public health.

 

Classes offered from schools like MIT and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health make quality education available for anyone with access to an Internet connection.

 

This collection of courses features classes offered by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Students learn skills like intercultural communication, understanding diversity, understanding addiction, analyzing public policy, working with different kinds of health care providers, organizations and communities, and providing services to underdeveloped countries or communities that have experienced disaster.

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Resource for anyone interested in public health education

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Scientists win 2 billion euros to fight brain disease, study graphene

The European Commission will award a total of 2 billion euros for research into brain disease and into the "miracle material" graphene which could be used to make flexible electronic devices and could lead to superfast Internet speeds.

 

 

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High doses of folic acid don't raise cancer risk: study

People taking high doses of the B vitamin folic acid are not at an increased risk of cancer, according to an international analysis - easing some concern about the possible side effects of national programs aimed to raise intake of the vitamin.

 

 

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Brain enhancements will play a major role in determining the future

Brain enhancements will play a major role in determining the future | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Many forward-thinking scientists are looking into solutions that would strengthen the brain by reinforcing its neurons with non-biological neurons made from carbon nanotubes.

 

These new artificial neurons would not only act as electrical bypass circuitry, giving patients a ‘fail-safe’ system should their brain become damaged, but would also enhance performance of healthy cells, providing ‘superhuman’ brain functions. Thoughts could be processed millions of times faster.

 

 

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Big medical data | KurzweilAI

Big medical data | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Recent new research has the potential to reshape medicine and health care through new scientific knowledge, novel treatments and products, better management of medical data, and improvements in health-care delivery.

 

At the end of 2012, the National Public Radio show “Fresh Air” featured a segment in which its linguistics commentator argued that “big data” should be the word of the year.

 

 

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Ray Kurzweil Says We’re Going to Live Forever

Ray Kurzweil Says We’re Going to Live Forever | Longevity science | Scoop.it

As a futurist, you are famous for making predictions of when technological innovations will actually occur. Are you willing to predict the year you will die?


My plan is to stick around. We’ll get to a point about 15 years from now where we’re adding more than a year every year to your life expectancy.

 

 

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Active Desk lets you burn calories while checking your email

Active Desk lets you burn calories while checking your email | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Many of us sit at a desk for extended periods each day – and that has doctors worried. Researchers are beginning to understand the associated health risks triggered by sitting for long durations, and suggest that people need to stand up, walk, and generally be more active throughout their day.

 

One way to get more exercise might be to try out the Active Desk, which combines a recumbent exercise bike with a work desk, allowing you to leisurely pedal off the pounds throughout the day.

 

 

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Patients and handicapped users test new mind-controlled tech | KurzweilAI

Patients and handicapped users test new mind-controlled tech | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Brain-computer interface allows patient to move his paralyzed arm with his mind (credit: ) More than 100 patients or handicapped users have voluntarily
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Caloric restriction has a protective effect on chromosomes

Caloric restriction has a protective effect on chromosomes | Longevity science | Scoop.it

According to a study carried out by a team led by María Blasco, the director of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) and head of the Telomeres and Telomerase Group, a sustained lowering of food intake over time results in an increase of telomere length -- the ends of chromosomes -- in adult mice, which has a protective effect on the DNA and genetic material.

 

 

Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Caloric restriction is step 6 of the Transcend program. Moderate CR (10%) is manageable and easier to sustain over the long term.

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How to kill lymphoma cancer cells without chemotherapy | KurzweilAI

How to kill lymphoma cancer cells without chemotherapy | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Northwestern Medicine researchers have developed a nanoparticle that attacks a cancerous lymphoma cell by mimicking HDL.(high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol, an essential nutrient for the cell.

 

The nanoparticle tricks the cell by blocking cholesterol from entering the cell. Deprived of an essential nutrient, the cell eventually dies.

 

 

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Nanobubbles used to kill and treat different cells at the same time

Nanobubbles used to kill and treat different cells at the same time | Longevity science | Scoop.it

U.S. scientists are developing a technique that will target and kill cancer cells while simultaneously treating others in the same sample. Centered on fine-tuning the use of cancer destroying nanobubbles, the research holds promise for treating cancer patients in a way that’s far more targeted than chemotherapy.

 

 

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U.S. researchers map emotional intelligence of the brain

U.S. researchers map emotional intelligence of the brain | Longevity science | Scoop.it

We tend to think of reason and emotion as being two different things, but it turns out that there may not be a choice between the heart and the head. A University of Illinois team, led by neuroscience professor Aron Barbey, has made the first detailed 3D map of emotional and general intelligence in the brain, that shows a strong overlap of general and emotional intelligence.

 

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Hearing loss may speed decline in cognitive abilities, a study shows

Hearing loss may speed decline in cognitive abilities, a study shows | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Those who were hearing-impaired were 24 percent more likely to have cognitive problems than were people with normal hearing. Also, cognitive abilities declined 32 to 41 percent more quickly in those with hearing impairment than in the others. People with hearing impairment developed problems with thinking and memory skills about three years sooner than the others did.

 

 

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Stem cell 'first aid' for rat stroke

Stem cell 'first aid' for rat stroke | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Stem cells given in the vital period immediately after a stroke may aid recovery, suggest researchers.

 

Rats injected with stem cells 30 minutes after a stroke had almost normal brain function restored within a fortnight.

 

The research, published in the journal Stem Cell Research and Therapy, adds to others which have found that stem cells could aid stroke patients by boosting the body's ability to repair tissue damage.

 

 

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Resveratrol may help to protect against alcohol induced nerve damage, suggest researchers

Resveratrol may help to protect against alcohol induced nerve damage, suggest researchers | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Resveratrol could help to battle diseases characterised by damaged to nerve cells from alcohol, according to new lab findings.
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Healthspot replaces doctor's office with a telepresence kiosk

Healthspot replaces doctor's office with a telepresence kiosk | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Telepresence physicians have been predicted since Hugo Gernsback foresaw the “radio doctor” in the 1920s. HealthSpot of Dublin, Ohio takes this idea a step further with its HealthSpot Station. It’s a telepresence kiosk that acts as an alternative to the traditional doctor’s office.

 

 

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Better Than The Borg: The Neurotech Era

Better Than The Borg: The Neurotech Era | Longevity science | Scoop.it

What if you could read my mind? What if I could beam what I’m seeing, hearing, and thinking, straight to you, and vice versa? What if an implant could store your memories, augment them, and make you smarter?

 

Long the stuff of science fiction, technology that can directly tap into, augment, and connect human brains is becoming science fact. And that means big changes for all of us.

 

 

Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Sight, hearing, motion, memory-- we have made many advances in human hacking already. What's next?

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Correcting faulty DNA: stronger bodies, smarter minds, longer lives

Correcting faulty DNA: stronger bodies, smarter minds, longer lives | Longevity science | Scoop.it
What if you could improve your memory, become smarter and stronger, and live in an ageless disease-free body – just by taking a pill?

 

Though this may sound like the stuff of science fiction, experts are developing a better understanding of our genetic mysteries, including the powerful influence that DNA wields on our lives. It's becoming clear that cancer, heart disease, diabetes, obesity; most mental disorders, and many other ailments, could all be the result of a clash between genes we inherited from our past, and today's modern environment.

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Crumpled graphene and rubber combined to form artificial muscle

Crumpled graphene and rubber combined to form artificial muscle | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Engineers at Duke University have now found that by attaching graphene to a stretchy polymer film, they are able to crumple and then unfold the material, resulting in a properties that lend it to a broader range of applications, including artificial muscles.

 

 

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Understanding bat evolution could lead to new treatments for viruses and aging

Understanding bat evolution could lead to new treatments for viruses and aging | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists believe the genes of virus-resistant and long-living wild bats might hold clues to treating cancer and infectious diseases in humans.

 

The theory is that when bats started flying millions of years ago, something changed in their DNA that provides resistance to viruses and helps give them a relatively long life. The researchers hope a better understanding of bat evolution could lead to new treatments for disease and aging in humans.

 

 

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Rice-Cell Cocktail Tough on Cancer Cells, Nice to Normal Cells

Rice-Cell Cocktail Tough on Cancer Cells, Nice to Normal Cells | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Juice from rice cells can knock out two kinds of human cancer cells as well or better than the potent anti-cancer drug Taxol, a Michigan Technological University scientist has discovered in laboratory tests. Plus, it does something Taxol can’t do: it plays nice with normal cells.

 

 

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Yearly payments to Canada's doctors exceeds $20B: report

Yearly payments to Canada's doctors exceeds $20B: report | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Canada's doctors are paid more than $20 billion overall a year, making physicians' services the third largest component of health-care spending after hospitals and drugs, a report released Tuesday says.
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‘Feel-good’ food may be addictive, though direct evidence has not been found

‘Feel-good’ food may be addictive, though direct evidence has not been found | Longevity science | Scoop.it

High levels of sugar, fat and salt, and various flavors and food additives might actually hijack the pathways of the brain in ways that are similar to opiates and other drugs.

The evidence suggests that sugar in particular stimulates a greater release of chemicals in the brain — including dopamine, the “pleasure molecule” — than releases triggered by, say, fruit and vegetables. Over time, the brain’s circuitry might become rewired to produce less dopamine in response to high-calorie, flavor-enhanced foods.

 

 

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