Longevity science
Follow
Find
53.2K views | +23 today
Longevity science
Live longer in good health and you will have a chance to extend your healthy life even further
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Curcumin's ability to wage war on cancer stem cells further verified by research

Curcumin's ability to wage war on cancer stem cells further verified by research | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Promising new research has demonstrated once again that the ingredient curcumin, which is the principal curcuminoid of the widely used Indian spice turmeric, a member of the ginger family, is a major cancer fighter, this time proving effective against esophageal cancer.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Diabetes may be linked to hearing loss: study

Diabetes has already been tied to an increased risk of kidney and cardiovascular troubles, nerve damage and vision loss, and now a Japanese study finds diabetics to be more than twice as likely as those without the disease to have hearing impairment.

 

It's thought that high blood sugar levels brought on by diabetes may lead to hearing loss by damaging blood vessels in the ears, said Horikawa.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Bebionic: Bionic Hands Are Getting Closer To The Real Thing

Bebionic: Bionic Hands Are Getting Closer To The Real Thing | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The bebionic is tightening its grip on its reputation as one of the world’s most advanced prosthetic hands. Watching a recent video of an amputee with the bebionic and it’s clear that bionics are nearing the point where they are no longer awkward and insufficient substitutes but life-changing replacements that give back much of what was so dearly lost.

 

See video about the 'Terminator arm'

 

For more on robotic hands:

http://www.gizmag.com/robot-rebuilt-sensitive-robotic-hands/25263/

more...
Nathan Heath's curator insight, March 23, 9:40 PM

Bebionic is clearly displaying why they are the leading company  in the development and production of prosthetic limbs. Bebionic are currently developing the world's most advanced prosthetic hands, known as the 'Terminator arm'.

 

This new technology will allow amputees to once again be able to undertake activities that require the use of both limbs.

 

 

Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Scanadu unveils its first medical home diagnostic tools

Scanadu unveils its first medical home diagnostic tools | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Ready for home diagnostic tools?

 

Scanadu is one of the many companies already on the case.

 

SCOUT, a palm-sized device designed by Yves Behar that Scanadu says will accurately read a variety of vital signs when held to the temple for a period of under 10 seconds. Data collected by the device is transmitted via Bluetooth to a smartphone, where the Scanadu app will display pulse transit time, pulse rate, electrical heart activity, temperature, heart rate variability and blood oxygenation. The data can also be transmitted to the user’s doctor. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Omega-3 Really Is Helpful | Linus Pauling review

Omega-3 Really Is Helpful | Linus Pauling review | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Although there have been conflicting reports on the benefits of omega-3 fish oil, a new study indicates that it’s still a good idea to take the supplement.

 

Scientists at the Linus Pauling Institute of Oregon State University analyzed studies of omega-3 fish oil supplements and reached several conclusions. They said that taking the supplement, as well as eating fatty fish, may prevent heart disease, and that the supplement could be beneficial for serious health problems besides heart disease.

 

Linus Pauling Research:

http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/othernuts/omega3fa/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

A novel thought-controlled prosthesis for amputees | KurzweilAI

A novel thought-controlled prosthesis for amputees | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

An implantable robotic arm controlled by thoughts is being developed by Chalmers University of Technology industrial doctoral student Max Ortiz Catalan in Sweden.

 

Ever since the 1960s, amputees have been able to use prostheses controlled by electrical impulses in the muscles, their functionality is limited because they are difficult to control, according to Catalan.

more...
Alexis GC's curator insight, February 13, 2013 5:50 PM

Definitivamente un post digno de RESCOOP
La idea es excelente, poco invasiva y con una muy alta probabilidad de éxito, además de ser totalmente revolucionaria pues hasta ahora no se han podido tomar los impusos electricos directamente de los nervios correspondientes para lograr el movimiento voluntario de una prótesis, con esta idea se aumentará la estabilidad de las señales captadas por los electrodos y podrán realizarse movimientos mucho más finos.

Excelente contenido, bien distribuído y perfectamente referenciado.

Puntaje 9.5 

Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Probiotics' Benefits May Be More Than a Gut Feeling

Probiotics' Benefits May Be More Than a Gut Feeling | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Probiotics, believed to help with digestion, are increasingly being studied to treat wide-ranging conditions, from colic to cholesterol and the common cold.

 

One of the fastest-growing dietary supplements, probiotics are now prominent on drug and big-box store shelves. They are live microorganisms—or "good" bacteria—that when consumed in capsules or yogurt are said to confer a health benefit.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Can a jellyfish unlock the secret of immortality? | KurzweilAI

Can a jellyfish unlock the secret of immortality? | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Interesting quotes from this story:

 

“There’s a shocking amount of genetic similarity between jellyfish and human beings,”

 

“Immortality might be much more common than we think,”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

MIT Media Lab births robotic weight loss coach

MIT Media Lab births robotic weight loss coach | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Autom, a robotic weight loss coach which began as a prototype at MIT, launches via an indiegogo campaign.

 

Hackers and investors welcome.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ray and Terry's from Biomarkers and Personalized Medicine
Scoop.it!

Whole-Genome Sequencing Trials Suggest Time Has Come to Bring Personalized Medicine to Cancer Field

Whole-Genome Sequencing Trials Suggest Time Has Come to Bring Personalized Medicine to Cancer Field | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Pathologists take note! Human whole-genome sequencing of tumors was the source of information for making treatment decisions in a recently published study.

Via Brian Shields
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Sorry, vegans: Eating meat and cooking food is how humans got their big brains

Sorry, vegans: Eating meat and cooking food is how humans got their big brains | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Vegetarian, vegan and raw diets can be healthful, probably far more healthful than the typical American diet. But to call these diets “natural” for humans is a bit of a stretch in terms of evolution, according to two recent studies.

 

Eating meat and cooking food made us human, the studies suggest, enabling the brains of our prehuman ancestors to grow dramatically over a few million years.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

New hope for sufferers of degenerative muscle disorders | KurzweilAI

New hope for sufferers of degenerative muscle disorders | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A new therapeutic technique to repair and rebuild muscle for sufferers of degenerative muscle disorders has been developed by an international team of researchers, according to a study published today in BioMed Central’s open access journal Skeletal Muscle.

 

The therapy brings together two existing techniques for muscle repair — cell transplantation (mesoangioblast stem cells) and tissue engineering, delivering the stem cells via a hydrogel cell-carrier matrix.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

As drug industry’s influence over research grows, so does the potential for bias

As drug industry’s influence over research grows, so does the potential for bias | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Over a year-long period ending in August, NEJM published 73 articles on original studies of new drugs, encompassing drugs approved by the FDA since 2000 and experimental drugs, according to a review by The Washington Post.

 

Of those articles, 60 were funded by a pharmaceutical company, 50 were co-written by drug company employees and 37 had a lead author, typically an academic, who had previously accepted outside compensation from the sponsoring drug company in the form of consultant pay, grants or speaker fees.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Scientists successfully treat Alzheimer’s symptoms in mice

Scientists successfully treat Alzheimer’s symptoms in mice | Longevity science | Scoop.it

By turning off an immune system transmitter in mice with an Alzheimer’s-like condition, scientists have been able to greatly reduce the accumulation of an abnormal protein known as amyloid-ß in the animals’ brains.

 

Previous studies have shown that the protein plays a central role in Alzheimer’s disease. It is hoped that the research may ultimately point the way towards a method of preventing or treating the disease in humans.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Holiday fitness gifts trend from high-tech to basic

Holiday fitness gifts trend from high-tech to basic | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Looking for the perfect holiday present for a fitness fan? Gift offerings this year range from apps that can store a run in the country to be viewed later to gadgets so sophisticated they measure quality of sleep as well as calories burned.

 

There is also the revival of the humble foam roller, which experts say, like old-time push-ups, squats and planks, has never been more popular.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Imaging brain structures that deteriorate in Parkinson’s | KurzweilAI

A new imaging technique developed at MIT offers the first glimpse of the degeneration of two brain structures affected by Parkinson’s disease.

 

The technique, which combines several types of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), could allow doctors to better monitor patients’ progression and track the effectiveness of potential new treatments, says Suzanne Corkin, MIT professor emerita of neuroscience and leader of the research team.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Human stool treatment upends race to treat colon germ

Human stool treatment upends race to treat colon germ | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Drugmakers racing to develop medicines and vaccines to combat a germ that ravages the gut and kills thousands have a new challenger: the human stool.

 

For patients hit hardest by the bacterium Clostridium difficile, getting a "stool transplant" could become a standard treatment within just a few years. Just as blood banks and sperm banks are now commonplace, stool banks may soon dot the landscape.

 

About 3 million Americans are infected annually with the bacterium - also known as C. diff - which spreads mainly through hospitals, nursing homes and doctors' offices.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

A step toward creating a bio-robot hybrid | KurzweilAI

A step toward creating a bio-robot hybrid | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Would it be possible to integrate biological components with advanced robotics, using biological cells to do machine-like functions and interface with an electronic nervous system — in effect, creating an autonomous, multi-cellular biohybrid robot?

 

...manipulation of signal transduction pathways is one way to interface cells with electronics. So the researchers genetically engineered protein cells from a Chinese hamster ovary to produce nitric oxide (NO) in response to visible light. Here’s how:

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

A New Look At Einstein’s Brain May Answer Why He Was So Smart

A New Look At Einstein’s Brain May Answer Why He Was So Smart | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Thanks to work of pathologist Thomas Harvey to preserve Albert Eisntein’s brain decades ago, we can continue to busy ourselves today with trying to figure out what made Albert Einstein so smart.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Why Your Heartburn Drugs Don't Work

Why Your Heartburn Drugs Don't Work | Longevity science | Scoop.it

New research suggests that in many people, heartburn may be caused by something other than acid reflux. But gastroenterologists are often stumped as to what it is and how to treat it.

 

Some 44% of Americans have heartburn at least once a month, and 7% have it daily, according to the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders. Heartburn that frequent is the most common symptom of gastroesophageal reflux disease, a diagnosis believed to be rising world-wide with obesity and advancing age.

 

One 2004 study cited a 46% increase in GERD-related visits to primary-care physicians over a three-year period alone.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

‘Fountain of youth’ technique rejuvenates aging stem cells | KurzweilAI

‘Fountain of youth’ technique rejuvenates aging stem cells | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A new method of growing cardiac tissue is teaching old stem cells new tricks.

The discovery, which transforms aged stem cells into cells that function like much younger ones, may one day enable scientists to grow cardiac patches for damaged or diseased hearts from a patient’s own stem cells — no matter what age the patient — while avoiding the threat of rejection.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Polymer implants could help heal brain injuries

Polymer implants could help heal brain injuries | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Using implants made from porous biocompatible materials, scientists have recently been successful in regrowing things such as teeth, tendons and heart tissue, plus bone and cartilage. The materials act as a sort of nanoscale three-dimensional scaffolding, to which lab-cultivated cells can be added, or that the recipient’s own cells can colonize.

 

Now, a Spanish research team has used the same principle to grow new brain tissue – the technique could ultimately be used to treat victims of brain injuries or strokes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Nobel winner and organ transplant pioneer Joseph Murray dies at 93

Nobel winner and organ transplant pioneer Joseph Murray dies at 93 | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Thank you, Dr. Joseph Murray, for your valuable contributions to medical science...

 

Dr. Joseph Murray, the surgeon who carried out the first successful kidney transplant and later won a Nobel Prize for his work in medicine and physiology, died on Monday in Boston at the age of 93.

 

Murray and his team completed the first human organ transplant in 1954, taking a kidney from one identical twin and giving it to his twin brother, opening a new field in medicine, the hospital said.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Wearable microchip monitors vital signs, draws power from cell phones

Wearable microchip monitors vital signs, draws power from cell phones | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Monitoring medical vital signs requires expensive, bulky equipment, but this could soon change thanks to a sensor being developed for the market that is so small it could be embedded in bandage. The microchip was created by electrical engineers at Oregon State University and is ready for clinical trials while a patent is currently being processed.

 

The reason the system-on-a-chip device is so small and thin, roughly the same as a postage stamp, is the absence of a battery. Here is the most impressive aspect of the sensor: it draws power from the radio-frequency energy emitted by a cell phone. It can harvest that type of energy within 15 feet (4.5 meters), and also from other radio-emitting devices. Even body heat and movement could theoretically power the sensor, the researchers say.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ray and Terry's from Biomarkers and Personalized Medicine
Scoop.it!

Health Sentinel: New methods offer hope for early diagnosis of mental illnesses - News Sentinel

Health Sentinel: New methods offer hope for early diagnosis of mental illnesses - News Sentinel | Longevity science | Scoop.it

"Health Sentinel: New methods offer hope for early diagnosis of mental illnesses: A few days before Thanksgiving, I was discussing with a friend his family's holiday plans..."


Via Brian Shields
more...
No comment yet.