Longevity science
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Live longer in good health and you will have a chance to extend your healthy life even further
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15-year-old wins Intel prize for software that detects cancer-causing genes

15-year-old wins Intel prize for software that detects cancer-causing genes | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Intel has announced the winners of its 2014 International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). According to Intel, the contest is the world's largest high school science research competition. The top prize went to 15-year-old Nathan Han for his software that studies the mutations of a gene linked to breast cancer.


Each year, around 7 million high school students across the globe develop and submit original research for the Intel ISEF competition. Over 1,700 participants from more than 70 countries, regions, and territories were selected to join this year's "week-long celebration of science, technology, engineering, and math".



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Aging Reversed in the Heart, Brain, and Muscles of Mice Thanks to Blood Factor

Aging Reversed in the Heart, Brain, and Muscles of Mice Thanks to Blood Factor | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The idea that blood is the basic stuff of life dates back to well before the scientific method. Yet, in a pair of new studies, researchers have found that blood — and specifically a growth factor in it known as GDF-11 — spurs the brains, muscles, skeletons and hearts of older mice to look and perform like those of younger mice.


A Harvard University study published recently in Nature Medicine focused on muscular-skeletal effects. Researchers there showed that injections of GDF-11, which the researchers had identified as something abundant in the blood of younger mice but scarce in that of older mice, improved both muscle tone and physical fitness.



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Touch Bionics updates i-limb Ultra Revolution prosthetic hand

Touch Bionics updates i-limb Ultra Revolution prosthetic hand | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Touch Bionics has unveiled the latest enhancements to its i-limb Ultra Revolution at OTWorld 2014 International Congress. Users can now set and assign different grips for different objects and configure the prosthetic hand via Android apps.


Touch Bionics calls the i-limb Ultra Revolution, "the most advanced and versatile prosthesis available," and says it, "offers more dexterity and moves more like a natural hand than any other powered prosthetic hand."



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Global life expectancy rises again, but new challenges loom

Average life expectancy has risen globally to 73 years for a girl born in 2012 and 68 for a boy following successes in fighting diseases and child mortality, the World Health Organization said on Thursday.


Big advances in the battles against infectious diseases such as measles, malaria, tuberculosis and polio have continued to extend life expectancy although other factors, such as people's lifestyles, are constraining longevity, the WHO said in its annual statistics report.



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Muscle pain not well defined in most statin studies

Studies evaluating cholesterol-lowering drugs might find more muscle problems if they did a better job of defining and asking about muscle pain, suggests a new review.


Researchers say 10 to 25 percent of real-world patients on statins report having muscle problems, but clinical trials consider these side effects to be rare.

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GaitTrack app makes cellphone a medical monitor for heart and lung patients | KurzweilAI

GaitTrack app makes cellphone a medical monitor for heart and lung patients | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

By simply carrying around their cellphones, patients who suffer from chronic disease could soon have an accurate health monitor that warns their doctors when their symptoms worsen.


GaitTrack, an app developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the U. of I. at Chicago, doesn’t just count steps. It uses eight parameters to perform a detailed analysis of a person’s gait, or walking pattern, which can tell physicians much about a patient’s cardiopulmonary, muscular and neurological health.



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Gene Signal in talks for a partner for eye disease drug

Gene Signal in talks for a partner for eye disease drug | Longevity science | Scoop.it

ene Signal is in talks with potential partners to help develop its new treatment for a leading cause of blindness in the elderly, the biotech firm's chief executive said on Tuesday.


Privately-held Gene Signal is looking to muscle in on the lucrative market for treating wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) currently dominated by Roche's Lucentis and Regeneron's Eylea.



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FDA gives approval for DEKA prosthetic arm controlled by muscle impulses

FDA gives approval for DEKA prosthetic arm controlled by muscle impulses | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Prosthetics have come a long way in recent years, with many artificial limbs incorporating advanced robotic and cybernetic systems that include everything up to and including mind control. Unfortunately, for all these advances, the lack of prosthetics capable of complex motor control means that most users see them as tools rather than replacement limbs. However, that may be changing as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has announced approval for marketing of the DEKA Arm system, the first prosthetic arm set to hit the market that translates signals from a patient’s muscles to carry out complex tasks.



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Anti-aging gene also enhances cognition | KurzweilAI

Anti-aging gene also enhances cognition | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A variant of the gene KLOTHO is known for its anti-aging effects in people fortunate enough to carry one copy. Now researchers find that it also benefits brain function by increasing overall levels of klotho in the bloodstream and brain.


But the improvements in learning and memory associated with klotho elevation aren’t strictly tied to aging. They do occur in aging mice, but also in young animals, according to a report published in the Cell Press journal Cell Reports (open access) on May 8th.



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Fruits and vegetables linked to stroke prevention

Fruits and vegetables linked to stroke prevention | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Eating more fruits and vegetables may reduce stroke risk by almost a third, according to a fresh look at recent evidence.


The results support existing recommendations from organizations like the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which already call for a diet rich in fresh greens.


“The findings are consistent with the current knowledge that increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables should be encouraged to prevent stroke,” Dr. Yan Qu said in an email.



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Harvard researchers find protein that could reverse the aging process

Harvard researchers find protein that could reverse the aging process | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers from the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) have shown that injections of a protein dubbed GDF11, when administered to older mice, appear to cause a reversal of many signs of aging. Analysis showed that every major organ system tested displayed signs of improvement, with the protein even appearing to reverse some of the DNA damage which is synonymous with the aging process itself.


The protein GDF11 is found in humans as well as mice, and is now being considered for possible human testing due to its surprising and apparently regenerative properties.



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High-fiber diet linked to lower death risk after heart attack

In a large U.S. study of men and women with a heart attack in their past, those who had upped their fiber intake the most afterwards had the lowest risk of death.


The pattern held true even after researchers accounted for medications that lower cholesterol, suggesting it’s important not to rely just on drugs to cut future risks, the authors said.



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Stem cells from teeth can make neuron-like cells and networks | KurzweilAI

Stem cells from teeth can make neuron-like cells and networks | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

University of Adelaide researchers have discovered that stem cells taken from teeth can grow to form complex networks of neuron-like cells, suggesting a possible therapy for stroke.


Although these cells haven’t developed into fully fledged neurons, researchers believe it’s just a matter of time and the right conditions for it to happen.



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Mice with MS-like condition walk again after neural stem-cell treatment | KurzweilAI

Mice with MS-like condition walk again after neural stem-cell treatment | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

When scientists transplanted human neural stem cells into mice with multiple sclerosis (MS), within a remarkably short period of time, 10 to 14 days, the mice had regained motor skills.


Six months later, they showed no signs of slowing down.


Results from the study demonstrate that the mice experience at least a partial reversal of symptoms. Immune attacks are blunted, and the damaged myelin is repaired, explaining their dramatic recovery.



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An ultra-sensitive chip for early cancer detection | KurzweilAI

An ultra-sensitive chip for early cancer detection | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

An international team of researchers, led by ICFO – Institute of Photonic Sciences in Castelldefels, has developed a “lab-on-a-chip” platform capable of detecting very low concentrations of protein cancer markers in the blood, using the latest advances in plasmonics, nano-fabrication, microfluids and surface chemistry.


Currently, most cancers are detected when the tumor is already composed of millions of cancer cells and the disease is starting to advance into a more mature phase.



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Aging Reversed in the Heart, Brain, and Muscles of Mice Thanks to Blood Factor

Aging Reversed in the Heart, Brain, and Muscles of Mice Thanks to Blood Factor | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The idea that blood is the basic stuff of life dates back to well before the scientific method. Yet, in a pair of new studies, researchers have found that blood — and specifically a growth factor in it known as GDF-11 — spurs the brains, muscles, skeletons and hearts of older mice to look and perform like those of younger mice.


A Harvard University study published recently in Nature Medicine focused on muscular-skeletal effects. Researchers there showed that injections of GDF-11, which the researchers had identified as something abundant in the blood of younger mice but scarce in that of older mice, improved both muscle tone and physical fitness.



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Researchers turn to GPUs to improve cancer therapy

Researchers turn to GPUs to improve cancer therapy | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Medical physicists at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center are latching on to advances in the computational speed of graphics processing units (GPUs) to drastically reduce the time required to calculate radiation therapy plans. The approach also increases the accuracy of calculations, allowing for faster, more precise, and more adaptable treatment of cancer patients.



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Cue lets users perform medical diagnostics at home

Cue lets users perform medical diagnostics at home | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Not so long ago, self health monitoring was largely limited to weighing ourselves to see how a diet was going and sticking a thermometer under our tongue to see if we were getting sick. For everything else we went to the family doctor. That was in the past.


Technology has put health and fitness monitoring firmly in consumers’ hands. Starting with pedometers in the 1980s and progressing to the myriad wearable fitness trackers flooding the market today. The grip has just tightened again with Cue – a device that allows users to run medical diagnostics from the comfort of their own home.



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Bioprinted 3D liver-mimicking device detoxifies blood | KurzweilAI

Bioprinted 3D liver-mimicking device detoxifies blood | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a 3D-printed device inspired by the liver to remove dangerous toxins from the blood.


The device, which is designed to be used outside the body — much like dialysis — uses nanoparticles to trap pore-forming toxins that can damage cellular membranes and are a key factor in illnesses that result from animal bites and stings, and bacterial infections.



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Electronic cuff in neck could keep blood pressure in check

Electronic cuff in neck could keep blood pressure in check | Longevity science | Scoop.it
For approximately 35 percent of patients, medication for high blood pressure doesn't work in the long run. That's why a team of researchers are developing a...
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Researchers seek a link between genes and brain injury

Researchers seek a link between genes and brain injury | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists studying head injuries have found something surprising: Genes may make some people more susceptible to concussion and trauma than others. A person’s genetic makeup, in fact, may play a more important role in the extent of injury than the number of blows a person sustains.



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Headway Ireland's curator insight, June 25, 2014 5:02 AM

Very interesting line of study...

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Haitian orphan gets nation's first 3-D printer prosthesis

Haitian orphan gets nation's first 3-D printer prosthesis | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A 12-year-old orphan boy handicapped from birth became the first recipient of a 3-D printer prosthesis in Haiti last month, thanks to a British-born software engineer in California.


Born without fingers on either hand, Stevenson Joseph had little hope of treatment in a country where programs for the disabled are rare apart from a handful of charities.



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A DNA-based nanosensor that detects cancer by its pH | KurzweilAI

A DNA-based nanosensor that detects cancer by its pH | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Bioengineers at the University of Rome, Tor Vergata and the University of Montreal have used DNA to develop a tool that detects and reacts to chemical changes caused by cancer cells. It may one day be used to deliver drugs to tumor cells.


The researchers’ nanosensor measures pH variations at the nanoscale, indicating how acidic (a higher pH level) or alkaline (a lower pH level).



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What it’s like to be 100 years old, in 10 charts

What it’s like to be 100 years old, in 10 charts | Longevity science | Scoop.it

So you want to live to 100? Some might say be careful what you wish for. But data culled from two recent reports show fairly high quality of life for the country’s 55,000 centenarians, a population that is expected to grow rapidly.


Not surprisingly, the vast majority of 100-year-olds (81 percent) are women.  Also not surprisingly, most are widowed.



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Recharging aging brains could be in the (young) blood

Recharging aging brains could be in the (young) blood | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A literal infusion of some "young blood" has the ability to turn back the clock and restore the mental capabilities of old mice, according to a study conducted by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. If similar results are seen in humans, the simple technique could lead to new treatments for forms of dementia, such as Alzheimer's disease.


The study builds on previous research conducted in 2011 that showed key regions of the brains of old mice produced more nerve cells when exposed to blood from young mice than did old mice exposed to blood from old mice. Previous experiments also showed



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