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Flexible sensor could lead to better artificial skin

Flexible sensor could lead to better artificial skin | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Using gold nanoparticles on top of a PVC substrate, researchers at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have built a new type of cheap, flexible sensor that simultaneously detects pressure, humidity and temperature with surprising accuracy. The sensor could be used to monitor cracks in bridges, create a better artificial skin to benefit amputees, or even to give robots that special "human touch."

 

 

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Stem-cell therapy wipes out HIV in two patients

Two men with HIV have been off AIDS drugs for several months after receiving stem-cell transplants for cancer that appear to have cleared the virus from their bodies, researchers reported on Wednesday.

 

Both patients, who were treated in Boston and had been on long-term drug therapy to control their HIV, received stem-cell transplants after developing lymphoma, a type of blood cancer.

 

 

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Fiber-rich grains tied to lower diabetes risk

People who eat a diet high in fiber-rich whole grains are less likely to develop diabetes or heart disease, according to a review of past studies.

 

The analysis was conducted for the American Society for Nutrition. In a position statement, the group said evidence suggests foods with cereal fiber or mixtures of whole grains and bran are "modestly associated" with a reduced disease risk.

 

 

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Red meat tied to worse colon cancer outcomes: study

People who report eating the most red and processed meat before being diagnosed with colon cancer are more likely to die during the next eight years, according to a new study.

 

"It's another important reason to follow the guidelines to limit the intake of red and processed meat," said Marjorie McCullough, the study's lead author from the American Cancer Society in Atlanta.

 

 

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3D-printed Cortex concept scratches the itch of healing broken bones

3D-printed Cortex concept scratches the itch of healing broken bones | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The only thing worse than breaking a bone is waiting for it to heal. During the healing process itself, wearing a fiberglass and plaster cast can be a stinky, itchy endeavor that is uncomfortable and inconvenient; all for an injury that is completely internal. Enter Jake Evill's Cortex concept. Beyond having an awesome last name, Jake Evill, a media design graduate of the Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, has managed to modernize the ancient concept of a splint using 3D printing technology.

 

 

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New cancer treatment beats chemotherapy without the toxic side effects

New cancer treatment beats chemotherapy without the toxic side effects | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new treatment for lymphoma and leukemia is more effective than chemotherapy, and avoids the toxic side effects.
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Augustino Muthoka's curator insight, July 3, 2013 7:11 AM

THIS IS GOOD NEWS... >> 

New cancer treatment beats chemotherapy without the toxic side effects..
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Hormone therapy in the 50s not linked to memory loss

Hormone replacement therapy during the early stages of menopause - typically around age 50 - doesn't hurt or help brain function, according to a new study.

 

Researchers found that women between the ages of 50 and 55 years old who took estrogen or estrogen with progesterone performed just as well on tests that measure memory problems as women of the same age who took a placebo.

 

 

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Dental health for tweens

Dental health for tweens | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Healthy tips for teeth, beyond avoiding sugar. 

 

Some that may surprise:

Tomatoes can degrade tooth enamel.

Parsley can help prevent decay.

Apples neutralize acids.

Chewing ice can contribute to bacteria build-up

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Upregulation of extrinsic apoptotic pathway i... [J Cell Biochem. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

"Results showed that curcumin induces growth arrest and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cell lines. Its effect was more obvious on the highly COX-2 expressing cell line..."

 

 

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Biotivia Longevity's curator insight, June 26, 2013 9:24 PM

Curcumin features a lot in research studies. Men with prostate concerns could look into adding curcumin to their diet. Curcumin is an active ingredient of the spice turmeric.

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ORAC's tarnished reputation doesn't diminish polyphenols' health benefits, expert says

ORAC's tarnished reputation doesn't diminish polyphenols' health benefits, expert says | Longevity science | Scoop.it
It has been almost a year since United States Department of Agriculture took down its ORAC database.  Now that this official reference point is gone, does this measure of antioxidant potential still have relevance in the marketplace?
Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Using the ORAC scale to understand antioxidant content in relative terms can still be useful. Comparing foods on this scale provides information that you can use to rank foods and evaluate the health benefits of a particular fruit or benefit in relation to others.

 

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Measuring the human pulse from tiny head movements to help diagnose cardiac disease | KurzweilAI

Measuring the human pulse from tiny head movements to help diagnose cardiac disease | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have developed a new algorithm that can accurately measure the heart rates of people depicted in ordinary digital video by analyzing imperceptibly small head movements that accompany the rush of blood caused by the heart’s contractions.

 

In tests, the algorithm gave pulse measurements that were consistently within a few beats per minute of those produced by electrocardiograms (EKGs). It was also able to provide useful estimates of the time intervals between beats, a measurement that can be used to identify patients at risk for cardiac events.

 

A video-based pulse-measurement system could be useful for monitoring newborns or the elderly, whose sensitive skin could be damaged by frequent attachment and removal of EKG leads.

 

 

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The Bank Where Doctors Can Stash Your Genome

The Bank Where Doctors Can Stash Your Genome | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new company offers a “gene vault” for doctors who want to add genomics to patient care.

 

Genomic sequencing might be more common in medicine if doctors had a simple way to send for the test and keep track of the data.

 

That’s the hope of Coriell Life Sciences in Camden, N.J., a startup that grew out of a partnership between the Coriell Institute for Medical Research and IBM. The company wants to facilitate the process of ordering, storing and interpreting whole-genome-sequence data for doctors. The company launched in January and is now working with different health-care providers to set up its service.

 

“The intent is that the doctor would order a test like any other diagnostic test they order today,” says Scott Megill, president of Coriell Life Sciences. The company would facilitate sequencing the patient’s DNA (through existing sequencing companies such as Illumina or Ion Torrent), store it in its so-called gene vault, and act as the middleman between doctors and companies that offer interpretation services. Finally, “we will return the genetic result in the human readable form back to the electronic medical record so the doctor can read it and interpret it for the patient,” says Megill.

 

“You need a robust software infrastructure for storing, analyzing, and presenting information,” says Jon Hirsch, who founded Syapse, a California-based company developing software to analyze biological data sets for diagnosing patients. “Until that gets built, you can generate all the data you want, but it’s not going to have any impact outside the few major centers of genomics medicine,” he says.

 

The company will use a board of scientific advisors to guide them to the best interpretation programs available. “No one company is in position to interpret the entire genome for its meaning,” says Michael Christman, CEO of the Coriell Institute for Medical Research. “But by having one’s sequence in the gene vault, then the physician will be able to order interpretative engines, analogous to apps for the iPhone,” he says. Doctors could order an app to analyze a patient’s genome for DNA variants linked to poor drug response at one point, and later on, order another for variants linked to heart disease.

 

The cloud-based workflow could help doctors in different locations take advantage of expert interpretations anywhere, says Christman. “This would allow a doctor who’s at a community clinic in Tulsa, Okla., order an interpretation of breast cancer sequences derived at Sloan Kettering,” he says.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Pluripotent cells from pancreatic cancer cells first human model of cancer's progression

Pluripotent cells from pancreatic cancer cells first human model of cancer's progression | Longevity science | Scoop.it

University of Pennsylvania scientists have used stem-cell technology to create a research cell line from a patient with advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma(PDAC).

 

This first-of-its-kind human-cell model of pancreatic cancer progression was published this week in Cell Reports from the lab of Ken Zaret, PhD, professor of Cell and Developmental Biology.

 

"It is the first example using induced pluripotent stem [iPS] cells to model cancer progression directly from a solid tumor, and the first human cell line that can model pancreatic cancer progression from early to invasive stages," says Zaret, also the associate director of the Penn Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

 

 

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How Safe And Effective Is Alternative Medicine?

How Safe And Effective Is Alternative Medicine? | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Alternative medicine -- from herbs to acupuncture to supplements -- is huge in America. Now, a prominent doctor says it's been way oversold.
Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Listen to a debate between Dr. Grossman and Dr. Offit, who believes that alternative medicine is dangerous.

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Keeping mentally busy tied to less memory loss

People who spend a lot of time reading, writing and otherwise seeking and processing new information lose their thinking and memory skills more slowly as they age, a new study suggests.

 

Researchers found being "cognitively active" both early and later in life was tied to better performance on memory tests among people in their 80s.

 

 

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Study shows iron reduction benefits cardio health | Research and Insights content from New Hope 360

Study shows iron reduction benefits cardio health | Research and Insights content from New Hope 360 | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Statin medications are known to have an effect on cellular iron. A group of researchers have compared the effects of statins on iron reduction and cholesterol levels (HDL/LDL ratio). It included patients with advanced peripheral arterial disease. Improved clinical outcomes were associated with lower iron levels but not with changes in cholesterol levels. This means that iron reduction may provide a low-cost alternative to statins for reducing inflammation associated with arterial ..

 

 

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Qardio unveils portable, wireless cardiovascular monitoring devices

Qardio unveils portable, wireless cardiovascular monitoring devices | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Thanks to the miniaturization of electronics and wireless technology, detailed cardiovascular monitoring no longer requires a visit to the doctor's clinic or a hospital. A new wave of cardiovascular monitoring devices can be carried or worn by patients as they go about their daily routine, with the collected data able to be transmitted wirelessly to healthcare professionals and family members. Healthcare company Qardio has unveiled two such devices that allow patients suffering, or at risk of developing cardiovascular conditions, to better monitor their health.

 

 

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Dance for Parkinson’s Disease: Movement as medicine

Dance for Parkinson’s Disease: Movement as medicine | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Dance has shown short-term benefits for people with Parkinson’s disease.
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PIP Biosensor Measures Stress and Gamifies the Art of Conscious Relaxation

PIP Biosensor Measures Stress and Gamifies the Art of Conscious Relaxation | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Most of us know when we’re stressed. Physical cues like stomach butterflies, a flushed face, or muscle tension are hard to miss. Problem is, said symptoms can be very difficult to control. Once going—these things tend to snowball.
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Rise in high-end treatment for low-risk prostate cancer

The proportion of U.S. men with early, slow-growing prostate cancer who received robotic surgery and other expensive treatments increased between 2004 and 2009, according to a new study.

 

Researchers found that use of those therapies also rose among men who were unlikely to die from prostate cancer because they were sick with other chronic diseases when their cancer was diagnosed.

 

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Weight Loss Doesn't Help Heart Health For Diabetics In Study : NPR

Weight Loss Doesn't Help Heart Health For Diabetics In Study : NPR | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers were surprised to find that people with Type 2 diabetes who lost a lot of weight didn't lower their risk of heart attacks or strokes. They did have better control of their blood sugar and saw other health benefits.
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How Machine Learning and Big Data Are Changing the Face of Biological Sciences

Until recently, the wet lab has been a crucial component of every biologist. Today's advances in the production of massive amounts of data and the creation of machine-learning algorithms for processing that data are changing the face of biological science—making it possible to do real science without a wet lab. David Heckerman shares several examples of how this transformation in the area of genomics is changing the pace of scientific breakthroughs.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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davidgibson's curator insight, May 28, 2013 11:05 PM

This 36 min video is well worth the time spent - to get an idea (hopefully a transferrable one) about Big Data and the frontiers of science. In this case both "wet lab" (test tubes microscopes) and "dry lab" (computer modeling with machine learning) and needed and so is content as well as computational literacy.

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New discovery of the ways cells move could boost understanding of spread of cancer | KurzweilAI

New discovery of the ways cells move could boost understanding of spread of cancer | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Led by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), investigators found that epithelial cells — the type that form a barrier between the inside and the outside of the body, such as skin cells — move in a group, propelled by forces both from within and from nearby cells — to fill any unfilled spaces they encounter.

 

The discovery about how cells move inside the body may provide scientists with crucial information about disease mechanisms such as the spread of cancer or the constriction of airways caused by asthma.

 

 

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Epigallocatechin gallate changes mRNA expression l... [Br J Nutr. 2012] - PubMed - NCBI

Catechins, compounds derived from green tea, have been shown to improve cholesterol metabolism in animal studies, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this function...

 

 

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Studies show that green tea extract contains polyphenols that can activate genes to help the liver process and neutralize cholesterol.

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Reversing the loss of brain connections in Alzheimer’s disease | KurzweilAI

Reversing the loss of brain connections in Alzheimer’s disease | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The first experimental drug to boost brain synapses lost in Alzheimer’s disease has been developed by researchers at Sanford-Burnham.

 

The drug, called NitroMemantine, combines two FDA-approved medicines to stop the destructive cascade of changes in the brain that destroys the connections between neurons, leading to memory loss and cognitive decline.

 

 

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