Longevity science
Follow
Find
56.9K views | +22 today
Longevity science
Live longer in good health and you will have a chance to extend your healthy life even further
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

X-ray device traps airborne pathogens and neutralizes them

X-ray device traps airborne pathogens and neutralizes them | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Help may be on the way for people with compromised immune systems, severe allergies, or who otherwise have to be wary of airborne nasties. A team of scientists have created something known as a soft x-ray electrostatic precipitator, or an SXC ESP for short. It filters all manner of bacteria, allergens, viruses, and ultrafine particles from the air – plus, it kills everything it catches.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ray and Terry's from Biomarkers and Personalized Medicine
Scoop.it!

Researchers Identify Biomarker and Potential Therapy Target in MS ...

Researchers Identify Biomarker and Potential Therapy Target in MS ... | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers discover proteins in the IL-6 signaling pathway may be leveraged as novel biomarkers of multiple sclerosis (MS) to gauge disease activity and as a target for new therapies.


Via Brian Shields
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Could going veg lower your risk of heart disease?

Could going veg lower your risk of heart disease? | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Vegetarians are one-third less likely to be hospitalized or die from heart disease than meat and fish eaters, according to a new UK study.

 

Earlier research has also suggested that non-meat eaters have fewer heart problems, researchers said, but it wasn't clear if other lifestyle differences, including exercise and smoking habits, might also play into that.

 

 

more...
Jamie callihan's comment, February 25, 2013 9:02 AM
This articles shows a study of vegetarians verse meat eaters. Vegetarians were less likely to get heart disease due to the fact they had lower cholesterol levels and blood pressure. They said this was probably due to the lack of red meat (especially the meat high in saturated fat) and the fruits and vegetables high in fiber in a vegetarian diet. To reduce the risk of heart disease, ypi do not need to cut out meat all together, but instead just cut back.
Jamie callihan's comment, March 3, 2013 11:39 PM
second check
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

GE developing robotic system for hospitals

GE developing robotic system for hospitals | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Presently, when an operation is going to be performed at a hospital, people first locate all the instruments that the surgeon will require, inspect them, arrange them on a tray, sterilize them, and then deliver them to the operating room. According to General Electric’s GE Global Research division, however, robots could do all of those things better. To that end, the group has recently partnered with GE Healthcare and the U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs, in a US$2.5 million two-year project to develop just such robots.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ray and Terry's from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Inhibiting NLK in cancers with mutated PTEN could turn the cancer's strength against it

Inhibiting NLK in cancers with mutated PTEN could turn the cancer's strength against it | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A mutation that allows cells to grow out of control could also provide a new way to target and destroy cancer cells. This potential Achilles’ heel comes from a mutation in a gene called PTEN, which is found in a wide range of cancers.

 

PTEN is one of many tumor suppressor genes that we have to prevent our cells from growing out of control. If the PTEN gene stops working because of a mutation, it can cause tumours to develop – indeed many tumors have a mutated form of PTEN. However when a door closes, a window opens: the PTEN mutation helps the tumor to grow, but it could also mark it out as a target.

 

Researchers from the Institute of Cancer Research, London, found that switching off another gene known as NLK (Nemo-like kinase) killed tumor cells that had the PTEN mutation. This makes NLK a good target for drug developers to create a new cancer treatment.

 

Initially, the researchers took samples of tumor cells with and without the mutation, and switched off genes for important proteins that are used for regulating lots of processes in the cell. To do this they used small interfering RNA (or siRNA) which interfere with the processes of specific genes. These siRNAs block the chain of events that allow a gene to produce a protein, effectively switching it off. By switching off 779 genes individually, they could look for ones where cells with the PTEN mutation died and cells without the mutation survived.

 

This is how the researchers discovered the powerful effect of switching off the NLK gene. They are not certain how this works but it appears to protect a protein called FOXO1 that can act as a backup tumor suppressor and cause the cancer cell to die. When PTEN is mutated, the FOXO1 protein becomes vulnerable to a process called phosphorylation, which means it is ejected from the cell nucleus and destroyed. NLK is one of the proteins that phosphorylates FOXO1 and so by switching off the NLK gene, FOXO1 is able to do its job.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

A step towards repairing the central nervous system | KurzweilAI

A step towards repairing the central nervous system | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC) and the University of Barcelona in Spain have discovered a biomaterial that can  generate new differentiated neural stem cells, as part of a project to develop an implant that allows brain repair and regeneration.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Anti-microbial hydrogel offers new weapon against drug-resistant bacteria

Anti-microbial hydrogel offers new weapon against drug-resistant bacteria | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Whether it’s in hospitals, restaurant kitchens or our homes, harmful bacteria such as E.coli are a constant concern. Making matters worse is the fact that such bacteria are increasingly developing a resistance to antibiotics. This has led to a number of research projects, which have utilized things such as blue light, cold plasma and ozone to kill germs. One of the latest non-antibiotic bacteria-slayers is a hydrogel developed by IBM Research and the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology in Singapore.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Polymer patches could replace needles and enable more effective DNA vaccines

Polymer patches could replace needles and enable more effective DNA vaccines | Longevity science | Scoop.it
MIT researcher are developing a new dissolvable polymer film that replaces the vaccination needle with a pain-free patch.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Bacteria-killing blue light used to stop infections

Bacteria-killing blue light used to stop infections | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Over the past few years, blue light has allowed us to understand heart problems, control brain functions, and activate muscle tissue. Now, another biomedical function can be added to its list – because it’s known to have antimicrobial qualities, it’s been used to stop infections of the skin and soft tissues.

According to the American Society for Microbiology, such infections are the second most commonly-encountered type in private practice, and the most common type presented in emergency rooms. Unfortunately, as bacterial resistance to antibiotics grows, other means of stopping these infections are increasingly needed.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Supplements for kids: There’s not much evidence that they’re valuable.

Supplements for kids: There’s not much evidence that they’re valuable. | Longevity science | Scoop.it

 

One exception: Many experts recommend Vitamin D supplements for kids of all ages.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Free Public health Open Courseware & Classes - College@Home

Public health is a diverse field that includes ideas and practices from economics, social studies, intercultural communication, global outreach, public policy, disaster preparedness, refugee health, and much more.

 

For students thinking about pursuing a career in one of the many different avenues of public health, and for professionals already working in the industry, open courseware provides a unique opportunity for exploration in public health.

 

Classes offered from schools like MIT and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health make quality education available for anyone with access to an Internet connection.

 

This collection of courses features classes offered by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Students learn skills like intercultural communication, understanding diversity, understanding addiction, analyzing public policy, working with different kinds of health care providers, organizations and communities, and providing services to underdeveloped countries or communities that have experienced disaster.

Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Resource for anyone interested in public health education

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Scientists win 2 billion euros to fight brain disease, study graphene

The European Commission will award a total of 2 billion euros for research into brain disease and into the "miracle material" graphene which could be used to make flexible electronic devices and could lead to superfast Internet speeds.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

High doses of folic acid don't raise cancer risk: study

People taking high doses of the B vitamin folic acid are not at an increased risk of cancer, according to an international analysis - easing some concern about the possible side effects of national programs aimed to raise intake of the vitamin.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Could stem cells repair damaged cones in retinas, allowing for daylight color vision? | KurzweilAI

Could stem cells repair damaged cones in retinas, allowing for daylight color vision? | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

For some time geneticists have known that stem cells in zebrafish can replace damaged vision cells.

 

This study showed that cone damage, rather than just rod damage, is possible with these stem cells.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Drug-delivery nanoparticles mimic white blood cells to avoid immune rejection | KurzweilAI

Drug-delivery nanoparticles mimic white blood cells to avoid immune rejection | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists at The Methodist Hospital Research Institute have found a possible way to fool the immune system to prevent it from recognizing and destroying nanoparticles before they deliver their drug payloads.

 

“Our goal was to make a particle that is camouflaged within our bodies and escapes the surveillance of the immune system to reach its target undiscovered,” said Department of Medicine Co-Chair Ennio Tasciotti, Ph.D., the study’s principal investigator.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Beer compounds could hold the key to better pharmacueticals

Beer compounds could hold the key to better pharmacueticals | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A beer a day might not keep the doctor away but hops, one of the basic ingredients in beer brewing, could be good for you.

 

In a development that could lead to better drug treatments for diabetes and cancer, University of Washington research associate professor of chemistry, Werner Kaminsky, has determined the exact structure of humulones and their derivatives – the acids in hops that give beer its distinctive bitter taste.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Team Of Doctors Successfully Perform Double Arm Transplant On Veteran

Team Of Doctors Successfully Perform Double Arm Transplant On Veteran | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The most extensive bilateral arm transplant to date has been successfully achieved thanks to an interdisciplinary team of doctors and nurses at John Hopkins Hospital. The operation, which was performed on December 18, lasted 13 hours and involved 16 physicians from orthopedics, vascular medicine, plastic surgery, and other disciplines from five hospitals.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Yoga may aid people with irregular heart rhythm

Yoga may aid people with irregular heart rhythm | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Regular yoga classes could help people with a common heart rhythm problem manage their symptoms while also improving their state of mind, a new study suggests.

 

According to the American Heart Association, about 2.7 million people in the U.S. have atrial fibrillation (AF), in which the heart's upper chambers quiver chaotically instead of contracting normally.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

How to build a bionic man | KurzweilAI

How to build a bionic man | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Rex the bionic man shows how close technology is to catching up with — and exceeding — the abilities of the human body, The Guardian reports.

Housed within a frame of state-of-the-art prosthetic limbs is a functional heart-lung system, complete with artificial blood pumping through a network of pulsating modified-polymer arteries.

He has a bionic spleen to clean the blood, and an artificial pancreas to keep his blood sugar on the level.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Inexpensive home-brewed prostheses created using 3D printers

Inexpensive home-brewed prostheses created using 3D printers | Longevity science | Scoop.it

When Ivan Owen from Washington State posted a video of his handmade mechanical hand prop on YouTube, little did he expect that he would be contacted by Richard Van As, a South African amputee and fellow craftsman living 10,000 miles away. Together, they designed and built a working prosthetic finger for Richard that we covered last October. After raising money to build more prototypes, the two went on to complete an entire prosthetic hand for a young boy named Liam who was born without fingers on his right hand, the design of which they are sharing online free of charge.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Artificial pancreas and algorithm improve treatment for type 1 diabetes | KurzweilAI

Artificial pancreas and algorithm improve treatment for type 1 diabetes | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The first trial comparing a new dual-hormone “artificial pancreas” with conventional diabetes treatment using an insulin pump has been completed by researchers at IRCM (Institut de Recherches Cliniques) of Montreal, led by endocrinologist Dr. Rémi Rabasa-Lhoret. It showed improved glucose levels and lower risks of hypoglycemia.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

U.S. researchers map emotional intelligence of the brain

U.S. researchers map emotional intelligence of the brain | Longevity science | Scoop.it

We tend to think of reason and emotion as being two different things, but it turns out that there may not be a choice between the heart and the head. A University of Illinois team, led by neuroscience professor Aron Barbey, has made the first detailed 3D map of emotional and general intelligence in the brain, that shows a strong overlap of general and emotional intelligence.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Hearing loss may speed decline in cognitive abilities, a study shows

Hearing loss may speed decline in cognitive abilities, a study shows | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Those who were hearing-impaired were 24 percent more likely to have cognitive problems than were people with normal hearing. Also, cognitive abilities declined 32 to 41 percent more quickly in those with hearing impairment than in the others. People with hearing impairment developed problems with thinking and memory skills about three years sooner than the others did.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Stem cell 'first aid' for rat stroke

Stem cell 'first aid' for rat stroke | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Stem cells given in the vital period immediately after a stroke may aid recovery, suggest researchers.

 

Rats injected with stem cells 30 minutes after a stroke had almost normal brain function restored within a fortnight.

 

The research, published in the journal Stem Cell Research and Therapy, adds to others which have found that stem cells could aid stroke patients by boosting the body's ability to repair tissue damage.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Resveratrol may help to protect against alcohol induced nerve damage, suggest researchers

Resveratrol may help to protect against alcohol induced nerve damage, suggest researchers | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Resveratrol could help to battle diseases characterised by damaged to nerve cells from alcohol, according to new lab findings.
more...
No comment yet.