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Longevity science
Live longer in good health and you will have a chance to extend your healthy life even further
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Another reason to eat well, lose weight and get in shape

Another reason to eat well, lose weight and get in shape | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Cutting your risk of cancer is no longer just about shunning tobacco. Be lean. Eat healthfully. Get active. Common-sense lifestyle strategies for lowering the risk of heart disease and diabetes are now being shown to help prevent many types of cancer.


Of course, there are few absolutes in cancer prevention. Cancer is still a riddle, with many factors, including genetics, playing a role. But growing evidence suggests that there are steps that we can take to lower our chances of getting the disease, experts say.



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A drug that can help wipe out reservoirs of cancer cells in bone marrow | KurzweilAI

A drug that can help wipe out reservoirs of cancer cells in bone marrow | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Cancer drugs that recruit antibodies from the body’s own immune system to help kill tumors have shown much promise in treating several types of cancer. But the tumors often return.


A new study from MIT reveals a way to combat these recurrent tumors with a drug that makes them more vulnerable to the antibody treatment. This drug, known as cyclophosphamide, is already approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat some cancers.



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Latest Tool to Fight Cancer Is a Crowdsourcing 'Asteroids'-Like Mobile Game

Latest Tool to Fight Cancer Is a Crowdsourcing 'Asteroids'-Like Mobile Game | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The promise of genetics to shed light on how we prevent and treat disease has been inextricably linked to the growth of computer power since the first human genome was sequenced in the 1990s. Computers account for faster, cheaper sequencing, and they allow researchers to sort through huge troves of data to look for the correlations between a specific genetic mutation and a particular health problem.


But Cancer Research UK, a group that has made notable advances in the genetic understanding of breast cancers, is turning that paradigm on its head. The organization is asking humans to sort through its data to mark genetic areas with extra copies of chromosomes because, it says, humans can see the disparities better than computers.


“Although the software is good, it’s nowhere near as good as the human eye for spotting subtle shifts in copy number,” the organization explained in a press release announcing its efforts to recruit citizen scientists.



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3D-printed molecule provides new perspective for cancer research

3D-printed molecule provides new perspective for cancer research | Longevity science | Scoop.it

While two-dimensional modeling of double-stranded DNA molecules has been useful for the purpose of cancer research, the composition of the G-quadruplex, a four-stranded DNA sequence, has proven a different beast. A 3D printing lab at the University of Alabama has successfully produced a physical model of its molecular structure, improving understanding of its makeup and potentially, helping develop a treatment for pancreatic cancer.


The project, a collaborative effort from US and London-based researchers, involved the gathering of X-ray crystallography data of the G-quadruplex molecule and translating it into a 3D printable model.



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Charged polymers unlock door to deliver nanoparticles to cancer cells

Charged polymers unlock door to deliver nanoparticles to cancer cells | Longevity science | Scoop.it

In recent years, we've seen various research efforts looking to specifically target cancer cells as a replacement for the shotgun approach employed by chemotherapy that also damages healthy cells. The trick is to develop a delivery vehicle that identifies and targets only cancer cells, while ignoring the healthy ones. Researchers have found charged polymers have this ability, opening the door for nanoparticles containing cancer-fighting drugs to deliver their payload directly to the cancer cells.


Previous approaches we've seen rely on coating nanoparticles with molecules that are recognized by receptors on the cancer cells that grant access for the delivery of drugs into the cancer cell. However, scientists at the University of Freiburg in Germany say these receptors can change, cutting off access to the cancer cell. The research team has developed a new approach that doesn't rely on these receptors.



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Weather may truly affect arthritis pain

For people with osteoarthritis of the hip, pain levels tracked with the weather over the course of a small two-year study, Dutch researchers say.


They looked at reported pain levels in a previous study of arthritis, then went back to weather records to document the conditions each day.


It turns out the participants' aches were just a little worse and joints just a little stiffer when humidity and barometric pressure levels rose.



Ray and Terry's 's insight:

If you think you feel the weather in your bones... you just might be right.

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Cochlear implants may be losing their awkward external hardware

Cochlear implants may be losing their awkward external hardware | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Thanks to the development of cochlear implants, many people who would otherwise be quite deaf are able to regain a limited sense of hearing. Unfortunately, the implants also incorporate external components that can get in the user's way, and that look ... well, that look like the user has something hooked up to their ear. Now, however, researchers at MIT, Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary have developed a chip that could lead to cochlear implants that are entirely implanted.



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Prosthetic Hand Wires In Patient's Nerves For Sensations Of Touch

Prosthetic Hand Wires In Patient's Nerves For Sensations Of Touch | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A number of projectsare closing in on the goal of delivering a prosthetic hand for amputees that allows them too feel how hard they’re holding an object and process some information on its texture.


“You could feel round things and hard things and soft things, and the feedback was totally new to me,” said Dennis Aabo Sørensen, a 36 year-old Danish man who lost his hand almost a decade ago while handling fireworks.


Sørensen usually wears a prosthetic that allows him to grip objects by detecting muscle movement in his stump, which is currently the gold standard of care for amputees.



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Omega-3 rich diet linked to more developed brain networks: Monkey data

Omega-3 rich diet linked to more developed brain networks: Monkey data | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Monkeys that consume a diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids have more developed neural networks than those who do not, according to new research.
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FDA approves PillCam video camera that you swallow

FDA approves PillCam video camera that you swallow | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Colonoscopies can be an uncomfortable procedure for patients who may already be worried about what results will be found. When the results are inconclusive, a patient's options can be limited, causing further distress. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has now approved a device for use after an incomplete procedure that is minimally invasive and can achieve similar imaging results to a colonoscopy. PillCam Colon is a pill-sized camera that is swallowed and passes through a patient's gastrointestinal tract.


Given Imaging's PillCam Colon was created specifically with the purpose of checking for colon cancer and is already commercially available in more than 80 countries. The study on which the FDA based its decision focused on identifying hyperplastic polyps and adenomas at least 6 mm in size. It found a 69 percent positive agreement between PillCam Colon results and a colonoscopy, and an 81 percent negative agreement.



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Stem cell-based treatment for baldness a step closer

Stem cell-based treatment for baldness a step closer | Longevity science | Scoop.it

By adding three genes to human skin cells called dermal fibroblasts that live in the dermis layer of the skin and generate connective tissue, a team led by Xiaowei "George" Xu, MD, PhD, at the Perelman School of Medicine was able to convert them into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The iPSCs, which have the ability to differentiate into any cell type, were then converted into epithelial stem cells (EpSCs) that are normally found at the bulge of hair follicles.


Through careful control of the timing of delivery of growth factors to the cells, the researchers say they were able to turn over 25 percent of the iPSCs into EpSCs in 18 days.



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Added sugars abundant In U.S. diets, linked to death

Most U.S. adults are eating too much sugar and that's linked to an increased risk of dying from heart disease, according to a new government study.


Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) analyzed nutrition surveys of U.S. adults from the past couple of decades and found most were getting more sugar than the daily limit set by the World Health Organization (WHO).



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"Smart bomb" puts antibiotic resistant bacteria in its sights

"Smart bomb" puts antibiotic resistant bacteria in its sights | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The increasing prevalence of bacteria resistant to antibiotic drugs is largely blamed on the over prescription and use of such drugs in humans and animals, leading to the evolution of so-called "superbugs." A new antibiotic "smart bomb" that can target specific strains of bacteria could provide the next-generation antibiotic drugs needed to stave off the threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.


Developed by researchers at North Carolina State University, the new technique offers the potential of a powerful new weapon in the fight against multi-drug resistant bacteria. And unlike conventional antibiotic drugs that kill both good and bad bacteria, the new approach targets and kills specific strains of bacteria, while leaving the beneficial bacteria untouched – hence the "smart bomb" tag.



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New therapies targeting cancer could change everything

New therapies targeting cancer could change everything | Longevity science | Scoop.it

...The doctors said he had stage 4 melanoma, with a virtually inoperable tumor, and that patients in his condition typically lived about eight months. By last June, the cancer had spread to his liver and lungs.


At that point Harris joined a clinical trial at Georgetown University, one of scores that have sprung up around the country to test a new class of cancer drugs called immune-checkpoint inhibitors.


Two weeks after his first infusion, Harris’s primary tumor was fading, along with the black cancerous beads around it. A month later, his liver and lungs were clean.



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X-Ray App Assists Doctors In Diagnosing Rare Conditions

X-Ray App Assists Doctors In Diagnosing Rare Conditions | Longevity science | Scoop.it

n recent years, ultrasound machines and eye exams have gone mobile, for example, and tiny portable lab kits have popped up to diagnose a number of diseases.


But an Irish venture, Experior Medical, is taking an indirect route to better care: It gives doctors practical experience via mobile device so they provide better care. Users of the company’s moniker app practice reading real X-ray images on an iPad in their downtime.


While a broken femur is easy to see, a tiny cancerous growth may not be, and doctors don’t ever get much practice spotting rare conditions.



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New study adds to evidence that mammograms do not save lives

A new study has added to growing evidence that yearly mammogram screenings do not reduce the chance that a woman will die of breast cancer and confirms earlier findings that many abnormalities detected by these X-rays would never have proved fatal, even if untreated.



Ray and Terry's 's insight:

We advise thermography to find a baseline, and then monitor for changes. We are not advising anyone to avoid getting mammograms. This is presented for consideration-- we encourage everyone to research for themselves and make informed decisions.

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Nanomotors controlled within living cells

Nanomotors controlled within living cells | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists at Pennsylvania State University have successfully inserted "nanomotors" into human cells, then remotely controlled those motors within the cells.


The nanomotors are described as "rocket-shaped metal particles," and they're propelled by externally-delivered ultrasonic waves. They can also be steered, by selectively applying magnetic fields.



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XStat treats bullet wounds with tiny injectable sponges

XStat treats bullet wounds with tiny injectable sponges | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Uncontrolled hemorrhage (bleeding out) is responsible for 80 percent of combat deaths. About the same proportion of those who die after being evacuated to a medical treatment facility also die of hemorrhage, usually associated with deep arterial wounds that cannot be treated using tourniquets – people die because we can't plug a simple hole. Now RevMedX, a small Oregon startup, has developed an alternative approach to treat such potentially survivable injuries.



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Scientists find gene linking brain's grey matter to intelligence

Researchers have found a gene linking intelligence to the thickness of so-called "grey matter" in the brain, and say their discovery could help scientists understand how and why some people have learning difficulties.


An international team of scientists analyzed DNA samples and brain scans from more than 1,500 healthy 14-year-olds and gave them a series of tests to establish their verbal and non-verbal intelligence.



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Melatonin may reduce risk of certain breast cancers: Study

Melatonin may reduce risk of certain breast cancers: Study | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Melatonin may have the potential to reduce the risk of certain breast cancers by slowing the growth of tumours, according to a new early stage study.
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3D-printed hip implant lets teenager walk again

3D-printed hip implant lets teenager walk again | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Mobelife, a Belgium-based implant design company, has 3D printed a custom hip implant and given a once wheelchair-consigned teenager the ability to walk on her own.


The 15-year old Swedish girl suffered from a congenital disease which saw a neurofibroma, a benign tumor which grows on the peripheral nervous system, cause extensive damage to her pelvis.



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Producing insulin-secreting pancreas cells from skin cells gives hope to diabetics

Producing insulin-secreting pancreas cells from skin cells gives hope to diabetics | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Type 1 diabetics suffer from a lack of beta cells in the pancreas, which are responsible for insulin production. Although glucose monitoring and insulin injections allows the disease to be managed, finding a way to replenish these beta cells would offer a more permanent solution. Scientists at Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco have provided hope for just such a treatment by developing a technique to reprogram skin cells into insulin-producing beta cells.


Because of their limited regenerative ability, researchers have had a hard time generating large quantities of beta cells. But now, thanks to stem cell technology, researchers in the lab of Gladstone Institutes' Investigator Sheng Ding, MD, PhD, have managed to transform skin cells into insulin-secreting beta cells.



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Virus-free, cord-blood-derived stem cells repair retinal tissue in mice | KurzweilAI

Virus-free, cord-blood-derived stem cells repair retinal tissue in mice | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Investigators at Johns Hopkins report they have developed human induced-pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) capable of repairing damaged retinal vascular tissue in mice.


The stem cells, derived from human umbilical cord-blood and coaxed into an embryonic-like state, were grown without the conventional use of viruses, which can mutate genes and initiate cancers, according to the scientists. Their safer method of growing the cells has drawn increased support among scientists, they say, and paves the way for a stem cell bank of  to advance regenerative medicine research.



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A Simple Test Tells Seniors If Their Memory Is Waning

A Simple Test Tells Seniors If Their Memory Is Waning | Longevity science | Scoop.it

With so few effective treatments for Alzheimer’s disease, seniors who may be experiencing loss of cognitive function often avoid testing for fear that they may have the dreaded disease. Yet other, more treatable problems are thought to account for 40 percent of the 44.4 million cases of dementia worldwide, and the treatments that do exist for slowing Alzheimer’s diseaserequire early intervention.


In other words, seniors stand to gain quite a bit from an expansion of cognitive check-ups.


Douglas Scharre, an Ohio State University neurologist, has developed a cognitive test that’s cheap and easy and can be administered to large groups of people at once. It’s a 20-minute, pencil-and-paper quiz that people can take anywhere, no doctor or dreaded computer needed.



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Stool test spots most colon cancers: study

An at-home test that reacts to blood in a person's stool can identify most colon cancers, according to a fresh look at some previous studies.


Researchers found the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) is able to detect 79 percent of colorectal cancers without making people change their diets or stop taking their medications, as some other screening tests require.



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